Zigbee Legal Issues UK--need to advice

Go To Last Post
9 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hi All

I got a small question

I am from the UK, i have read that if i use the AVR ATMEL zigbee chips, i have to purchase licenses for comercial use, but if i was to use the XBEE from digi i would not need to.

XBEE is slighly more expensive, but how much would license cost for the ATMEL Zigbee? And how would i go about this?

REgards

DJ

Thanks

Regards

DJ

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

https://www.avrfreaks.net/index.p...

Also check out the ZigBee Alliance link in the above thread.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

To clarify: You can use the Atmel AVR ZigBee chips with no additional licenses. You are free to develop any wireless application ontop of these devices, except you can not claim ZigBee compliance and certification without joining the ZigBee alliance and pass certification at a qualified test house.
The same rules applies regardless of the chipset you are using.

For the Atmel AVR ZigBee chipsets Atmel offers a wide range of firmware with various complexity to get you started:
TAT - Low level drivers
MAC - IEEE 802.15.4 Compliant
ZigBee Stack - Zigbee compliant

Suggest you check out the Atmel web for more details.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Besides ZigBee membership, if you start with a chip rather than an OEM module like XBee, you will have to pay for an FCC (or equiv.) Part 15 compliance test and report to file.

Unless you are going to sell 10,000, start with a module that is already type accepted by the FCC or equivalent.

Xbee, for example is type accepted in at least US, Japan and much of the EU.

Note also that the vast majority of applications today use IEEE 802.15.4 but not the ZigBee stack.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

For low volume series you can also use the devices/boards in the RZRAVEN kit as they hold FCC and ETSI certification.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

stevech wrote:

> Besides ZigBee membership, if you start with a chip rather than an
> OEM module like XBee, you will have to pay for an FCC (or equiv.)
> Part 15 compliance test and report to file.

There's a world outside of North America where FCC sets the rules.

European regulations are quite a bit different -- not from a technical
point of view, most of the tests are similar, but from a legal point
of view. In the EU, *you* as the vendor (of the final device) have to
declare conformity (which is what that "CE" label is for), you cannot
simply pass the certification of the used modules on. Sure, you can
use the module's certification as a certain base for your own
declaration, but likewise, you could also use e.g. a reference design
that has passed certification as a similar base.

Jörg Wunsch

Please don't send me PMs, use email if you want to approach me personally.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hi Guys

Thanks for all your advice

magnusp said

"
For low volume series you can also use the devices/boards in the RZRAVEN kit as they hold FCC and ETSI certification.
"

Does this mean that i dont need to get a license if i was to use the same device that are used in the RZRAVEN

Regards

DJ

Thanks

Regards

DJ

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

stevech wrote:
Besides ZigBee membership, if you start with a chip rather than an OEM module like XBee, you will have to pay for an FCC (or equiv.) Part 15 compliance test and report to file.

My understanding is that even if you start with an OEM module you still have to get your device accepted by the FCC for resale. It may not cost as much because you can submit the module's test results in place of having to pay for emissions and other testing, but the FCC still wants to review the device as a whole to make sure it conforms with the intended use of the frequency spectrum it utilizes.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

circuitmangler wrote:
stevech wrote:
Besides ZigBee membership, if you start with a chip rather than an OEM module like XBee, you will have to pay for an FCC (or equiv.) Part 15 compliance test and report to file.

My understanding is that even if you start with an OEM module you still have to get your device accepted by the FCC for resale. It may not cost as much because you can submit the module's test results in place of having to pay for emissions and other testing, but the FCC still wants to review the device as a whole to make sure it conforms with the intended use of the frequency spectrum it utilizes.

If you use an OEM module and the same antenna that was used for certification, in the US anyway no new cert is absolutely needed as I understand. But I could be wrong, or the following may prevail:

There is a low cost way to request a re-test waiver, e.g., file that you are using a different antenna but the EIRP is the same, or some such.

Now there are other FCC rules about a consumer or industrial product meeting the regulations for radiated and conducted emissions irrespective of the radio transmitter. Any electronic device must be tested and you'll see that annotated on the product's label somewhere. There are two or more categories: home an commercial/industrial, where consumer/home is more stringent. These tests are not as expensive as for a transmitter.

And the US FCC has regulations on health and safety too, for RF field strength for devices within X distance of a person. I went through this for a vehicle tracking project with vehicular rooftop antennas where we sought to use higher gain.

I'm not a legal expert here but this is what I've encountered on prior projects.

The project challenge was to avoid having the expert consultant for this charge us an inordinate $$$$$$$ fee for advise and direction.