ZBasic

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Though I’m an old fool C and ASM coder, I just gave “ZBasic” a try. This is a virtual machine running in an AtMega32 that interprets bytecodes generated by a compiler that’s much like Visual Basic. Library supports ints, longs, singles and all the AVR I/O devices. Pretty neat. The bytecodes go into a 32K or bigger fast serial EEPROM.

Runs pretty fast and has very high code density. Compiler and IDE are good. Takes 1-2 seconds to download a few hundred bytecodes and run; just edit, hit F5 and it’s running. Serial port interface.

You have to buy his chip or PC board (24 pin DIP).

I don’t work for this outfit:

http://www.zbasic.net/forum/
http://www.zbasic.net

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I used to have a ZBasic compiler for the Z80 micro. Back in the old CPM days. I wonder if there is any connection to the current compiler?

Kind Regards,

Neil Wrightson.

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Cool ...

It's one of our freaks that makes this product.

https://www.avrfreaks.net/index.p...

/Bingo

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I've just written my first (hobby use) program for ZBasic. It's on their website's FILES section, a DS1307 support program with test/demo. That code illustrates some amazing things one can do with these tools.

I am super-impressed with this compiler/tool. I can write code essentially the same as Microsoft Visual Basic and it compiles and runs in a couple of seconds. Extremely high code density - since this is a p-code interpreter. The execution speed is more than adequate and the multitasking (preemptive) is great and simple.

I was impressed that functions can return strings and that all the memory management related to string, string concatenation, and so on, are handled well and without the hassels I've seen in C and Basic compilers for the Harvard architecture chips.

Truly amazing what a $4 micro can do these days, with a good tool - and the excellent run-time interpreter (that also supports all the AVR chip I/O devices).

I don't want to start a flame-war on languages, but having written software for "X" years (many) in many languages, this one is unique and outstanding.

I have no affiliation with the company. This ZBasic is unrelated to ZBasic for x86es. It is a modernization of BasicX for the AVR, but not from the same vendor.

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You say it has multitasking? What language is the hexapod code written in that multitasks the servo outs to 6 legs with 3 servos each?

Imagecraft compiler user

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I have the pin and code compatible 'BasicX-24' I had set this aside when I started AVRs but I recently (finally) recieved a reply from NetMedia that rhey will have a Mac OS X version of the IDE in a ccouple of months. If you haven't noticed, the Basic Stamp is very weak and slow compared to the BasicX and ZBasic..... One more point to show you AVRs are better than PICs. :D


My AVR Site

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Looks like ZBasic is a quantum improvement on BasicX which was ten quantums over the BasicStamp (ah, the paged memory architecture)

re hexapod, above. I'm not in to robotics.

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I was thinking about getting the Micro64 from Micromint at:

http://www.micromint.com/product...

I would think it programs in C and assembly, though.

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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Ohh, I forgot!
http://www.comfiletech.com/index...
This is yet another pin compatible Stamp/B(z)X-24 module....and cheaper. It use the mega 128 and only $34.


My AVR Site

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It's all about the compiler and language in these things.