WWVB receiver

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Hey guys, I've been playing with a WWVB clock receiver and so far have not been able to correctly receive the time code.

I'm ~500mi as the crow flies from Ft Collins so I would think I should be able to receive day or night, although night should be better.

 

I have two of the receivers, one with the long stick loop, and one with the short stick loop antenna, both have fairly short leads to the receiver board.

Has anyone here tried one of these with success?

If so which sketch did you use?   I've tried 3 or 4 I've found on github, but so far no dice.

 

Jim

edit: https://www.amazon.com/CANADUINO...

this is the short stick receiver I have, the long stick is similar and I think is made by the same company.

This topic has a solution.

 

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Last Edited: Thu. Oct 29, 2020 - 12:57 AM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Tue. Oct 27, 2020 - 08:22 PM
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Yea I have two of the Universal-Solder receivers.

edit: but they are not the everset rcvr's!   Thanks for the heads up.

 

Jim

 

 

Keys to wealth:

Invest for cash flow, not capital gains!

Wealth is attracted, not chased! 

Income is proportional to how many you serve!

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Last Edited: Tue. Oct 27, 2020 - 08:45 PM
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I guess you know those antennas are directional and have to be oriented correctly, broadside facing Fort Collins, approximately.  RF noise might prevent it from getting a signal.  

 

I have a LaCross "atomic" clock.  It gets the signal most nights.  It starts looking at midnight, assuming it knows the time of day.  I'm in New York state. 

 

Mine is sitting on a shelf just above my monitors.  I don't know it it can get the signal if my monitors and computer are on, but midnight is usually past my bedtime.

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did you have to actually solder the 32KHz xtal? and how did you bend the legs? I know that these crystals are a very fragile thing and thus accidentally you could have damaged them.

If you have a scope you can try to see if they are running. If they are and are about 32KHz ( your scope will give them an offset due to the changing of the load capacitance ) if they are not running that could be the problem.

 

I would have expected them to mount the crystal and fix it to the board with a kit glue.

 

Also from what I see on the description is that the antenna seems to be very directional and you need to keep it at right angle from the clock source.

This reply has been marked as the solution. 
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steve17 wrote:
I don't know it it can get the signal if my monitors and computer are on, ...
Have became aware that video monitor horizontal frequency has increased.

steve17 wrote:
... but midnight is usually past my bedtime.
smiley

 


Help with WWVB Radio Controlled Clocks | NIST

[2/3 page]

What to Do When They Don't Work

...

My clock doesn't synchronize at all

...

  • Locate the clock at least 1 or 2 meters away from any computer monitors, which can cause interference (some monitors have a scan frequency at or near the WWVB carrier frequency of 60 kHz).

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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meslomp wrote:
did you have to actually solder the 32KHz xtal?

Actually its a 60kHz xtal, the receiver can be used for other similar services that operate on other frequencies(different xtal is supplied) in other parts of the world, there is a cut out in the pcb so the leads do not need to be bent, but just tack soldered to the board.   The receiver seems to work, and I can see the data with a scope, but it is just noisy enough to not sync.  

I have had the antenna taped to a NW facing window, but at my location it should be oriented more westerly.

I'll try extending the antenna leads and tape it to a west facing wall and see if that helps.  BTW I have a radio clock on the South facing wall in the same room that syncs just fine. 

I was curious if anyone else had tried a similar project and what program or sketch they used.    Thanks for all the suggestions, I'll keep at it until it works.

 

Jim

 

 

Keys to wealth:

Invest for cash flow, not capital gains!

Wealth is attracted, not chased! 

Income is proportional to how many you serve!

Lets go Brandon!

Last Edited: Wed. Oct 28, 2020 - 12:51 PM
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Try dialing 1-303-499-7111 (yes, no fake)...I used to call WWV all the time & listen to it.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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What "tunes" the receive frequency on those boards in the first message?

 

Never mind. Reading more reveals crystal. That board is really strange. I don't even see any smt pads! Must be the back side with the source logo.

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

Last Edited: Wed. Oct 28, 2020 - 08:14 PM
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avrcandies wrote:
I used to call WWV all the time & listen to it.

 

Hello

Is John Wall there?

Are any Walls there?

Hmm... What is holding up the roof?

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ka7ehk wrote:

What "tunes" the receive frequency on those boards in the first message?

 

Never mind. Reading more reveals crystal. That board is really strange. I don't even see any smt pads! Must be the back side with the source logo.

 

Jim

Yea, you order the board with what freq. you want and they supply the xtal for that freq.  I think there is only two or three to choose from.

Here is the back side of the board with all the goodies:

Jim

 

 

Keys to wealth:

Invest for cash flow, not capital gains!

Wealth is attracted, not chased! 

Income is proportional to how many you serve!

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Last Edited: Wed. Oct 28, 2020 - 08:33 PM
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I want to hear how you make out with those things. I have an upcoming precision clock calibration requirement.

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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Wooho! It works!

i found a usb extension cable so I could place the receiver about half way across the room on top my book shelf and it started working. So the key was getting it off the work bench away from the monitor and computer stuff with the antenna rod pointed N/S so it is broadside to Ft Collins now.

 

thanks everyone for your help.

 

jim

 

 

Keys to wealth:

Invest for cash flow, not capital gains!

Wealth is attracted, not chased! 

Income is proportional to how many you serve!

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How far do you have to separate it? Is a reference signal derived from the received decoding (such as 1PPS) available?

 

Thanks

West Coast Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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What software do you use? In my experience you will never get perfect reception of every data packet.
I suggest that you free run a regular quartz timer. When you receive a packet, check integrity thoroughly before using it to synchronise your quartz.
.
I am pretty sure that kitchen clocks work this way. It is too expensive to run the radio 24 hours. Sleep long and wake up periodically to check for a good signal.
.
David.

Last Edited: Thu. Oct 29, 2020 - 11:02 AM
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I've used one of those modules (Universal Solder Canaduino) with the UK's MSF time signal. They're ok for setting the time, but there's a lot of jitter (10s of mS) on the output compared to a receiver I liberated years ago from an old alarm clock.

 

Steve

Maverick Embedded Technologies Ltd. Home of Maven and wAVR.

Maven: WiFi ARM Cortex-M Debugger/Programmer

wAVR: WiFi AVR ISP/PDI/uPDI Programmer

https://www.maverick-embedded.co...

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EverSet PCBA are being restocked.

EverSet ES100-MOD WWVB BPSK Phase Modulation Receiver Module

...

NOTE: Single orders of this product can ship immediately. Orders of multiple items can have shipping delays of some days due to the ongoing test of 3000+ receiver modules.

...

edit 7-Nov'20 :

Orders including these modules can be delayed by 1-3 days due to the complex test procedure. 

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sat. Nov 7, 2020 - 06:04 PM
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david.prentice wrote:
What software do you use? In my experience you will never get perfect reception of every data packet.

No I have been a ham long enough to know RF is not reliable, and did not expect to find perfect reception, the current sketch I'm running now runs a software clock timed off the 16MHz resonator on the UNO, and updates it when ever a good radio packet is received.   Last night when it all started working the data was near perfect, I checked it again this morning, and it was hit or miss on the data.  I'll do some more research this weekend when I can watch it during the day. 

I have another sketch that uses a RT clock module from sparkfun and it updates it when ever a good packet is received, if needed.  I'll switch to it later this weekend as it also has an LED display support in it.

Thanks guys, it has been fun.

 

Jim

 

 

Keys to wealth:

Invest for cash flow, not capital gains!

Wealth is attracted, not chased! 

Income is proportional to how many you serve!

Lets go Brandon!

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scdoubleu wrote:
... but there's a lot of jitter (10s of mS) on the output compared to a receiver I liberated years ago from an old alarm clock.
A few orders of magnitude better synchronization by a dsPIC :

(PDF) Inexpensive SDR-based longwave radio controlled clock for time dissemination in industrial wireless sensor networks

...

In particular, the DCF77 transmitter is located close to Frankfurt/Main and it is managed by the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Its transmission range is on the order of 2000 km, thus the LF signal covers most of central Europe. Interesting to notice, it uses both amplitude and phase modulation for maximizing time accuracy. For all these reasons, it has been considered as the reference time standard in this work.

...

 

CONCLUSIONS

[next to last sentence]

Experimental tests, carried out using a synthetic time reference signal, highlights that the use of phase modulation allows for an overall synchronization error on the order of tens of microseconds, despite the reduced available bandwidth.

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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ka7ehk wrote:
Is a reference signal derived from the received decoding (such as 1PPS) available?

The WWVB signal codes the date/time info into BCD digits that take one minute to send, each digit is one second long PWM, so you may be able to derive a pulse output on the rising edge of each bit, not sure how well that would work for you.  The simple receiver used here works from the AM modulation (PWM), but the station also send phase modulation as well, and may provide better recovery under margin conditions over AM mode.

Attached is the NIST doc about the coding, I'll let you decide if it will work for you.

A GPS module may be a better solution and most have PPS output.

 

Attachment(s): 

 

Keys to wealth:

Invest for cash flow, not capital gains!

Wealth is attracted, not chased! 

Income is proportional to how many you serve!

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Will have to think about how to use something like that in my application. I need to time fairly long intervals (on the order of 24 hours). Phase jitter of 10s of milliseconds is not a big deal. Its the delta time over that long interval that is important (I think). Had a clock that used WWVB here (about 1200 mi from Ft. Collins) and it worked fine at night, most of the time. 

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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ka7ehk wrote:
Its the delta time over that long interval that is important

Then that may work for you, as the main clock of an uno is not that accurate, but by sync'ing with the radio, seems to hold time well, comparing with the voice announcements from WWV.

I'll update with what I find this weekend, that will give a few days to drift and sync a few times.

 

Jim

 

 

Keys to wealth:

Invest for cash flow, not capital gains!

Wealth is attracted, not chased! 

Income is proportional to how many you serve!

Lets go Brandon!

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Genuine Unos are crap.   They use a ceramic resonator.

Most clone Unos use a proper HF XTAL.

 

If you are only interested in a 24 hour delta the HF XTAL will give you 50ppm accuracy.

For long term accuracy i.e. over weeks, months and years you need something better e.g. sync with WWV, MSF, DCF77 or just the internet.

 

David.

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I have listened to WWV many, many times but not on 60khz, only on the 2.5Mhz, 5Mhz, 10Mhz and 15Mhz transmissions. Being in South Africa the 20mhz area has always been too noisy and propagation is not as good up at those frequencies.

 

I can't find any but I was wondering if anyone ever produced a clock receiver for these frequencies instead of 60khz which I have never heard, even with my largest antennas I have had over my many years as an SWLer. Might be an interesting project.

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
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Call 1-303-499-7111 & you can still hear the broadcast.   Long, long ago we didn't know about calling long distance & accidentally ran my friend's parents phone bill sky high (since we called it many times a day for a few weeks).

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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WayneZA wrote:
I have never heard, even with my largest antennas I have

Hey Wayne, the long wave signals at 60kHz will not propagate to south africa, your best time reference would be from a GPS module, and is very easy to do as well.

Even if you could receive it, there is nothing to hear as it is sent using the carrier only, a bfo or ssb receiver could hear it, but it is just long and short (< 1 sec) carrier pulses.

happy dx'ing!

Jim

 

 

Keys to wealth:

Invest for cash flow, not capital gains!

Wealth is attracted, not chased! 

Income is proportional to how many you serve!

Lets go Brandon!

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gchapman wrote:

https://www.universal-solder.ca/?utm_source=sendinblue&utm_campaign=Valentines_Day_2021&utm_medium=email

...  shipping is free* for orders over 200 CAD ...

You'd need to buy an awful lot of clock modules to make that CAD 200  !
 

surprise

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WayneZA wrote:
... but I was wondering if anyone ever produced a clock receiver for these frequencies instead of 60khz ...
Yes though Ralph does mention the phase noise.

a 10.00000000 Mhz timebase locked to NBS station WWV

by ralph klimek VK3ZZC

March 24 2016

[middle of first paragraph]

...

On the other side of the planet  here on the bottom end of Oz,  the signal is good, mostly good in fact but hardly enough strength to be considered usable as a timebase. 

...

found by

"wwv" phase modulation

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:

 

Yes though Ralph does mention the phase noise.

 

found by "wwv" phase modulation

 

Thanks for the link gchapman, an interesting read which I may delve into a bit deeper some time.

 

ki0bk wrote:

sent using the carrier only, a bfo or ssb receiver could hear it, but it is just long and short (< 1 sec) carrier pulses.

happy dx'ing!

Jim

 

Thanks Jim, building an SSB receiver may be a bit challenging as I have never worked with RF circuits apart from tuning my radios periodically. I also wouldn't want to dedicate my AOR 3030 or 7030 to this purpose as it seems a bit wasteful. laugh

 

ki0bk wrote:

Hey Wayne, the long wave signals at 60kHz will not propagate to south africa

 

Unfortunately you are right, I have hunted and listened to many of the South African airport NDB (non-directional beacon) transmissions too, which are between 112khz and 518khz and they are tough to hear from a distance.

 

I remember though the cold war stories about the US Navy ELF and Russian ZEVS systems running on 76hz and 82hz respectively. They were the systems those countries would use to advise their strategic submarines to launch nuclear weapons in the event of nuclear war, and could be heard at any point on the planet and down to several hundred meters depth. As the stories go, the scarily funny part about those systems was that the US system would transmit an encrypted signal to advise their submarines to launch, and the Russian system was if they stopped hearing the signals, launch. surprise Kind of brings to mind "hey comrade, that fuse has blown again ... oh ... wait ... don't worry, its too late". Scary stuff!!!

 

PS: No disrespect whatsoever intended towards the old Soviet Block or its citizens, just the manner in which they are reported to have used their system.

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
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3 for 2 :

EverSet ES100-MOD WWVB BPSK Phase Modulation Receiver Module (UNIVERSAL-SOLDER®)

 

Otherwise, remainder is 20% off until 24-May'21.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:
3 for 2 :

A complete kit here:https://www.universal-solder.ca/...

 

 

 

Keys to wealth:

Invest for cash flow, not capital gains!

Wealth is attracted, not chased! 

Income is proportional to how many you serve!

Lets go Brandon!

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   I was wondering if anyone ever produced a clock receiver for these frequencies instead of 60khz

 

There was one in Elektor, and the sender used was Droitwich on 198kHz. Do not remember details, perhaps based on SN7490N and that family.

This station is still operating.

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Project update, I have switched to using the newer PSK version of the WWVB receiver, here: https://www.universal-solder.ca/...

unlike the previous generation of AM receiver, this one is a bit smarter, the data is received with in the chip, and then you access the data via I2C. Very easy to use compared with the data slice output of the AM chip and then decoding the data stream to extract the time data.

So far, I have only played with the demo Arduino sketch...

Having fun with Yet Another Atomic Clock Project (YAACP)

Jim

 

 

Keys to wealth:

Invest for cash flow, not capital gains!

Wealth is attracted, not chased! 

Income is proportional to how many you serve!

Lets go Brandon!

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We in old Eu can have 75kHz clocks, if not far from Frankfurt.

I am just 1000km away, and use some portable clocks, one is precious: Oregon Scientific.

Sometimes the signal is very weak and the clock is struggling.

 

My opinion is: be aware that no petty antenna is good enough. Do use biggest old ferrite rod you have,

wind the coil add a cap to resonate on 60k, and use few turns link to device.

 

 

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This module uses two antenna rods, recommends they are set at right angles to each other, chip selects the one with the best signal level.

https://www.universal-solder.ca/...

 

 

Keys to wealth:

Invest for cash flow, not capital gains!

Wealth is attracted, not chased! 

Income is proportional to how many you serve!

Lets go Brandon!

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If in a cottage, suits well. When you are in Faraday-cage of concrete beton city house, sometimes the solution is the rod antenna in the roof and coax. cable with one or two turns on each side. As your device is smart, it will tell you whether to think of any addition.

My clock is based on DS3231. I must be happy with 1s per month precision.

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You can of course build a (simple to construct|) long-wire antenna tuned to resonate at 60 khz, but be warned, it will make the long in long-wire more like LONG at 60khz (wavelength at 60khz is about 5000m!) or you could build something like a shielded loop like this -

 

https://www.febo.com/time-freq/wwvb/antenna/index.html

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
  • No, I do not believe in software or intellectual property piracy or theft
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Wind the cable into a coil of about 3 foot (1 meter) diameter.

 

Such winding plus a huge cap will result in very low Q factor.

The rod antenna may achieve very good results, comparing to 1m-wire constructions.

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I am about 500km from MSF transmitter at Anthorn.   And about 450km from DCF77 at Frankfurt.

 

Regular supermarket kitchen clocks work just fine from Anthorn.

Using a hobby MSF60 module and a microcontroller is a bit hit and miss but usable.   (i.e. to synchronise a free running clock from a verified signal)

I guess that I would get a good signal from DCF77 but I have never tried.

 

Surely USA is a big place.   And Canada is even further away from WWVB at Fort Collins.

Which either means that US and Canadian supermarkets sell pretty good kitchen clocks or you rely on some other means of time signal.

 

Perhaps the Canadian receivers from Universal-Solder have a really, really good performance.   I can't think of anyone wanting a 5000km antenna but a ferrite rod is acceptable.

 

Wayne has got no chance of receiving WWV, MSF or DCF.   Perhaps there is a South African transmitter.

 

David.

 

Edit.   Wikipedia is brilliant.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ra... shows VLF stations in Russia, Japan, Germany, UK, USA, Canada, ...

And of course Fort Collins has more power than everyone else !!

Last Edited: Tue. Jun 22, 2021 - 05:07 PM
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Ft Collins is not so far from Canada, being "just on the other side" of Montana which abuts Wyoming which is only a few (50 miles?) from WWVB. But, if by "Canada", you mean Montreal or Quebec City or such, then it is a fair distance. Here, in Western Oregon (1500 km and two mountain ranges), it is pretty much night time.

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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WWV was great... before the days of civilian GPS !

 

Today's GPS modules typically have a pretty good RF front end, and will usually pick up a decent number of satellites even indoors, unless you have aluminum siding, etc.

 

smiley

 

JC

 

Edit:

I think this was a $5 USD GPS module, including the patch antenna, (the square block overlying the PCB).

Weekend project!

 

JC

 

Re-Edit:

This article, from a couple of NASA guys, discusses using a GPS 1 PPS signal as the basis for verifying a Time Stamp signal.

It mentions that the 1PPS is +/- 100 nSec of a second mark.

 

JC

 

 

 

Last Edited: Wed. Jun 23, 2021 - 01:12 AM
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david.prentice wrote:
Wayne has got no chance of receiving WWV,
WWVB whereas WWV (#31) is likely.

WWV's carrier may be enough for a calibration source; accurate 1PPS from WWV may be difficult due to phase noise.

Splash some cash for an atomic clock?

Atomic Clocks | Microchip Technology

 

edit : maybe?

Can’t Afford an Atomic Clock? Get a Molecular One! | Electronic Design

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Wed. Jun 23, 2021 - 02:43 AM
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DocJC wrote:
... and will usually pick up a decent number of satellites
Will GNSS satellites survive a superflare?

The next micronova will aid in "sweeping" Earth orbit.

 

GMS: X-Class: A Guide to Solar Flares (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

...

The most powerful flare on record was in 2003, during the last solar maximum. It was so powerful that it overloaded the sensors measuring it. They cut-out at X17, and the flare was later estimated to be about X45. A powerful X-class flare like that can create long lasting radiation storms, which can harm satellites and even give airline passengers, flying near the poles, small radiation doses.

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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david.prentice wrote:
Perhaps the Canadian receivers from Universal-Solder have a really, really good performance.   I can't think of anyone wanting a 5000km antenna but a ferrite rod is acceptable.

 

DocJC wrote:
WWV was great... before the days of civilian GPS !

 

Today's GPS modules typically have a pretty good RF front end, and will usually pick up a decent number of satellites even indoors, unless you have aluminum siding, etc.

 

But I thought everyone wanted a nice 'small' 3-30Mhz Log Periodic in their back yard!

 

Excellent directional performance, wonderful lightning conductor (just disconnect your radios first!), pretty red lights on top for low flying aircraft, very effective scarecrow! And all for the measly price of a few thousand USD!

 

 

Structural Characteristics  

Boom Length

72 ft
21.95 m

Longest Element

104.16 ft
31.75 m

Turning Radius

63.5 ft
19.35 m

Total Number of Elements

19

 

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
  • No, I do not believe in software or intellectual property piracy or theft
Last Edited: Wed. Jun 23, 2021 - 04:09 AM
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The Log Periodic looks interesting, could you set it up in my backyard (tower too) and let me test it out?  laugh   I would not hurt it as I never sling out more than 5 watts

Last Edited: Wed. Jun 23, 2021 - 04:43 AM
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WayneZA wrote:
But I thought everyone wanted a nice 'small' 3-30Mhz Log Periodic in their back yard!

 

What surprises me nice here is 3-30MHz, any 'normal'-ordinary antenna is expected to be 7-30M, and this one is extraordinary (The best one).
Can you provide also the Gain across the range, please.

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W4GNS. wrote:
The Log Periodic looks interesting, could you set it up in my backyard (tower too) and let me test it out?  laugh   I would not hurt it as I never sling out more than 5 watts

 

Sure! Should be done in a jiffy! laugh

 

grohote wrote:
What surprises me nice here is 3-30MHz, any 'normal'-ordinary antenna is expected to be 7-30M, and this one is extraordinary (The best one).

Can you provide also the Gain across the range, please.

 

No, no, you guys misunderstand, that's not mine! (As much as I wish I had a couple of these instead of my long/random-wires to feed my SWL radios and MFJ945E tuner. I have also been considering a beverage or two given that I am living on a farm with lots of bush around, and I have a random loop which performs pretty well too. I have a couple of T2FD's and a full length G5RV folded up in a box somewhere too. I used to make many antennas at one point in my life. laugh

 

@Grohote, I agree that Log Periodic's usually start at around 6-7Mhz which is mostly due to the immense length of the radials when covering frequencies below that. The one I posted above is a commercially available Log Periodic which comes with an 80-foot rotatable mast. Very nice indeed but unfeasible for 99.9% of radio-heads.

 

EDIT: I think I may still have a Quadrifilar Helix I never completed lying around somewhere too, made from fridge copper tube and PVC. Yeah, I dabbled in weather satellite imagery too.

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
  • No, I do not believe in software or intellectual property piracy or theft
Last Edited: Wed. Jun 23, 2021 - 07:47 AM
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I will not debate the WWVB vs GPS, as I have both clock projects up and running as we speak, both have been fun and expanded my learning experience. 

For all the hams on the forum, keep an ear out for KS0KS this weekend, it's going to be a blast this year! 

 

Fly over Jim

 

 

Keys to wealth:

Invest for cash flow, not capital gains!

Wealth is attracted, not chased! 

Income is proportional to how many you serve!

Lets go Brandon!