Wire wrap?

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Some decades ago, I wrapped up a Z80 maschine. Later I red about something called(?) "wrap only": A pencil like tool with a holder for a smal wire reel on the top. The wire went in the middel of the "pencil" down to the tip, a wire wraping. The thinking are to go from wraping pin to wraping pin without cut the wire.

I have some reel s of that wire, and, I shoold like to try it; I have an smal Arduino "thing" to try out.

What are the tool caled, and whew to buy it?

HM

HM

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As far as I know, it is just "wire wrap tool".

I expected "OK Industries" to have such a tool but they do not even have the simple pencil-shaped ones any more. Not sure where else to suggest.

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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ka7ehk wrote:
As far as I know, it is just "wire wrap tool".

I expected "OK Industries" to have such a tool but they do not even have the simple pencil-shaped ones any more. Not sure where else to suggest.

Jim

Does not mater, I have 3 ordinar tools ;-)

HM

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Thanks, but no. This sems to be "ordinary" wrapong tool.

HM

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I had one of these, I found it in wikipedia as wiring pencil.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wir...

Alex

"For every effect there is a root cause. Find and address the root cause rather than try to fix the effect, as there is no end to the latter."
Author Unknown

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"For every effect there is a root cause. Find and address the root cause rather than try to fix the effect, as there is no end to the latter."
Author Unknown

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Thanks.
I have a Road Runner kit on my desk. I will try it out once more, but it is not what I am searching.

HM

HM

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I know what you are talking about. A simple hand wire-wrap tool with a holder for a spool of wrapping wire on the top. They are nice though I found them a little awkward in tight spaces.

The RoadRunner wiring tools appear to handle only bare copper wire or enamel wire, not the wire wrap wire. Wire wrapping takes a special bit that fits over the square pin where the wire is wrapped. But, they have the right basic shape.

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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Otherwise, switch to surface mount I find my old spool of wire wrap wire useful for silly pc layout mistakes. I don't think anybody makes as many of those as I do:D

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

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mossige wrote:
Thanks.
I have a Road Runner kit on my desk. I will try it out once more, but it is not what I am searching.

HM

I thought it fitted your description

Quote:
A pencil like tool with a holder for a smal wire reel on the top

What is the difference of the tool you seek, is it the use of an insulated wire?
The one I had was similar to the pictured ones using bare wire (it wasn't copper but not sure what it was.)

Alex

"For every effect there is a root cause. Find and address the root cause rather than try to fix the effect, as there is no end to the latter."
Author Unknown

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The tool you show, are for soldering. The wire are spesial preparered, the soldering melt down the insulation.

The tool I are searching, have an tip for wirewrapingand use a special wire for that purpose; the insulation are broken over the edges of the wraping pin.

HM

HM

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All the wire wrapping I ever did on square pins, the insulation had to be stripped first.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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I got my wire wrapping tool at Radio Shack a long time ago. Still use it on most of my projects.

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I recall a tool of that description that slit the insulation lengthwise. When wrapped, the wire was forced through the cut and into contact with the pin. Vector Slit-N-Wrap.

Rick

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RickB wrote:
I recall a tool of that description that slit the insulation lengthwise. When wrapped, the wire was forced through the cut and into contact with the pin. Vector Slit-N-Wrap.

I remember that one. Yes, it let you wire wrap from pin to pin to pin rather than wrapping two pins together, then one of those to a third and so on. A lot faster, especially for bus work.

I have a wiring pencil (the other, similar tool mentioned) and use it all the time. It uses a low melting (burning) point magnetic wire that is wrapped around ordinary solder pins and then heat and solder is applied. The insulation melts and the solder binds it to the pin. Similarly it is very handy for bus work. I wired a 4 K byte (yup, 'K') memory card with 32 RAM chips using it.

Unlike a wrapping tool, the wiring pencil works well with SMD. I've found I can attach SMD parts with .05" lead centers to .1" center vectorboard by bending up alternate pins and attaching a lead to them using the wire from the wiring pencil. I'm using, I think, 34 AWG wire in it now. It makes the original wire (28 AWG???) seem like a battery jumper cable.

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cmartin wrote:
Unlike a wrapping tool, the wiring pencil works well with SMD. I've found I can attach SMD parts with .05" lead centers to .1" center vectorboard by bending up alternate pins and attaching a lead to them using the wire from the wiring pencil. I'm using, I think, 34 AWG wire in it now.
Similar to Chan's Progressive Wiring Techniques.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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RickB wrote:
I recall a tool of that description that slit the insulation lengthwise. When wrapped, the wire was forced through the cut and into contact with the pin. Vector Slit-N-Wrap.

Rick

Slit-N-Wrap, that is the name. I found this:

http://www.epanorama.net/sff/Man...

Page 75

Dearching for source.

Thanks.

HM

HM

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Dearching?

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

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Digikey seems to still have slit-n-wrap stuff, though at "collector" prices. IIRC, it required special wire rather than using standard 30g wire-wrap wire (sites say it's 28g)

I also remember a simpler tool that used a form of enameled wire with meltable insulation; you'd wrap it around posts and solder THROUGH the insulation. I don't recall the name, though. Various searching indicates that solder-through enamel is pretty common now...

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Torby wrote:
Dearching?

Misspell.

HM

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Ah yes, slit-n-short. If you pulled the wire too tight around another post, the edge would scrape the insulation and you would get an extra intermittant connection. I wire-wrapped a few projects with it including an 8085-based name badge that used one of those expensive HP 8-digit 5x7 dot matrix LEDs...
/mike

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westfw wrote:
Digikey seems to still have slit-n-wrap stuff, though at "collector" prices. IIRC, it required special wire rather than using standard 30g wire-wrap wire (sites say it's 28g)

I also remember a simpler tool that used a form of enameled wire with meltable insulation; you'd wrap it around posts and solder THROUGH the insulation. I don't recall the name, though. Various searching indicates that solder-through enamel is pretty common now...

I found the tool at Digikey I to, but the price are unacctable, and the dtock are 0.. There have to be something to do vith a 8" lathe and some old wraping tool.

I have 12 reels of wire. It will last for rest of my life.

Thanks for the help.

HM

HM

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Not all enameled wires are created equel. Some enamels are relatively high temperature. For the purpose of prototyping and project building, I found that wire stripped from Litz wire/cable works great. The enamel has a relatively low melting temperature.

Roger

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He might be referring to this one:

http://www.digikey.com/product-d...

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Ah. A bit more searching suggests that the other wrapping tool I was thinking of was the "Just Wrap" tool from "OK Machine tool", and turned up a picture here: http://www.wjm2234.com/ebay/7980...

I couldn't find much other evidence of its existence, though...

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I made a Z80 computer once with the red "wiring pen" as seen on Battlestar Galactica. You just wrapped the green wire around the pin a couple times and soldered. Was pretty easy except you wanted to keep the wires away from other pins lest you soldered them too. Somebody came up with a little plastic part to snap into your perf board to hold the wires. I just looped the wire.

Funny thing was the computer tended to "sing" softly while it was running. I could just hear it. Probably couldn't hear it now.

Z80 chip & crystal, 8 2102 ram chips, a 2708 eprom, a row of 7 segment LED displays, a pile of .1uf capacitors and a keypad. Was pretty fun. I programmed the eprom with the programmer at Junior College with a program to put codes in ram and run the "program." 3 4x6 inch perf boards. Maybe that's why I like tiny 2113's, eh? (I've decided to start buying 4113s instead.)

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

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Just for information's sake. The 'solder soluble magnet wire' (typical commercial names for wire: Soldereze, Polythermaleze) wiring technique was first developed by CalTech's Jet Propulsion Labs in the mid 60's for rapid prototype assembly.
Vector sold a couple of different models of a 'wiring pencil' which held a sewing machine bobbin full of typically #32 solder soluble magnet wire. I've built many prototypes over the years with this technique including a 6502 based TIM plus 4Kbyte RAM board, medical electronics devices, etc. Very fast and very durable. I used a Weller TCP series iron with an 800 degree F tip.
Itstechpro

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Wirewrap these days? Um, I don't think so, man.

(I do find the really fine wire is very useful.)

Attachment(s): 

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

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Clean fingernail!

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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And unlike restraints.. not at all chewed up

A blue tongue lizard just came into the shed...
http://www.outback-australia-tra...
Rarely seen as I usually see frill neck lizards on a daily basis.

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So, over in another forum, someone claimed that WireWrap posts were "special" (harder, sharper, corners or something) compared to today's common 0.025inch square pins. Yes? No? I though that square pins were square pins...

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Wire wrap posts were longer, to accommodate several wires * a few wraps on every post.

Trivia: A wire wrapped bond becomes better conducting over time.

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westfw wrote:
So, over in another forum, someone claimed that WireWrap posts were "special" (harder, sharper, corners or something) compared to today's common 0.025inch square pins. Yes? No? I though that square pins were square pins...

Let's not get back to that debate about radiused corners and fiords.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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Quote:
So, over in another forum, someone claimed that WireWrap posts were "special" (harder, sharper, corners or something) compared to today's common 0.025inch square pins. Yes? No? I though that square pins were square pins...

At work today I did a very unscientific experiment to test this. I snipped 2 ordinary wire wrap socket pins and 2 .025 connector pins from old prototype boards. The wire wrap pins fractured, revealing a rough granular stripe between the cut portion of the pin before the cut was completed and the connector pins had a continuous shiny cut up to the point of separation. I repeated this several times on each pin with the same results. Highly unscientific, but given that a wire wrap pins job is to cut into the wire to create a gas tight connection, it seems reasonable.

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If you wrap properly, with each turn tightly against the pin, you get a very reliable connection. If you wrap improperly with the turns in a wad at the bottom of the pin, you get a very unreliable connection.

In early 80's, an old tape deck quit working. We never actually used it for anything, but there seemed to be a panic to get it working again. When I dug into it, I found one improperly wrapped pin. I just untangled the mess, stuck the used wire into my wrapping tool and wrapped it right, the old tape deck started working again. Yea, I should have used a new wire, but i didn't want to try digging the old one out of the pile to see where the other end was.

The attitude of the engineers was "the tape deck is perfect. Dig out the computer it originally belonged to and..." So I wasn't able to open up the tape deck to find it almost all neatly wire wrapped and looking like brand new.

Hans always wanted me to write a CP/M bios for it that would run the tape at high speed, counting blocks, to find the "track and sector." I admitted it might be fun to watch but never took the time. It'd be a REALLY slow way to run CP/M.

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut.