Will people laugh at my AVR project pictures?

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I couldn't think of a better topic... 10 out of my 12 AVR boards are built using stripboards, not professionally pre-etched boards.

Electronics is my hobby, not my profession, and I had already experienced being laughed at. Many people (in general) have already judged my work as being "high school stuff."

As for AVR Freaks, I have a lot of AVR project pictures to upload, but fear of being laughed at. My projects are mostly LED-based and serial-based communication projects. I'm not advanced with Bluetooth, USB, fancy LCDs, Ethernet, and Wi-Fi within my AVR projects.

Anyways, I want to upload my AVR pictures here, but am very hesitant with fear that everyone here is going to laugh at me. Please provide me feedback on this topic. Thanks.

Kuya Marc

Aspiring Digital Graphics Artist & Illustrator

Retired Embedded Speech Synthesis Systems Developer

Due to emotional trauma in 2014, I have stopped working with embedded electronics!

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you won't know until you try. I'm sure we'll all be very nice. Most of my projects are much the same :)

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I might chuckle a little, but you wont hear me from 12000 miles away!

Imagecraft compiler user

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kuyamarc wrote:
I couldn't think of a better topic... 10 out of my 12 AVR boards are built using stripboards, not professionally pre-etched boards.

Electronics is my hobby[...]


I see nothing wrong in building circuits on perfboards. On the other hand, I despise building other than trivial examples on solder-less breadboards, yet oh so many people do that. And they are not shy to exhibit the resulting bird's nest - why would you then be shy to show your circuits?

At the end of the day, it's the functionality which really counts, isn't it.

JW

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Post them. I'm new here, but everyone, for the most part, seems quite helpful.

You shouldn't be so concerned about what others think. To quote a current advertisement here in the States, "Maybe we should march off to mamby pamby land and find some self confidence." (Just a joke).

Post your project and pics as they will likely help someone.

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just post the stuff here.
then we can all have a good laugh about it.
and from then on be serious again.

note that at least we then know that you are serious.

also keep in mind that when we are laughing about it it is far better then us crying about what you have made....

regards

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I don't see why people would laugh at projects that use perforated boards. I've seen many commercial products that use them. They're bulky and whatnot, but they work. Converting to a PCB doesn't make something less of a "high school project". That's the part of electronics that takes the least amount of intelligence to complete. Just plug a circuit into some software, it gives you an image of the circuit layout, and really, it's all rote work. It certainly takes some skill to properly solder some of the smaller components, but it's not the kind of skill I would care to take pride in having.

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I've used various methods to prototype circuits, and not just for micro's. SMT parts are soldered onto adapters that provide standard .1" spacing to match 'dip' or 'plcc' type footprints for standard perfboards. I've used both copper clad and unclad boards. For the unclad type I've used peel and place copper foils (cut to size with a knife) for ground and vcc buses. I've used 'Manhattan' style breadboards (bits of copper clad pc material islands glued to clad or unclad boards) mixed with conventional perf board with point to point solder and or wire-wrap. Whatever works. Some hams call this 'Ugly' construction. I've seen 'dead bug' style construction used with SMD chips, but my hands are not steady enough to make such connections. I would NEVER laugh at such 'one off' prototype methods. I consider these true "MacGyverism's", being able to put working prototypes together using nothing but "stone knives and bear skins" as Spock would say.

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kuyamarc wrote:

Anyways, I want to upload my AVR pictures here, but am very hesitant with fear that everyone here is going to laugh at me. Please provide me feedback on this topic. Thanks.

Kuya Marc

That has nothing much to do with projects themselves, indeed: time will cure this young man flaw of hesitating. Just do it - post one project and see what happens.

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Dont care how your boards are look but what they do or can do with some impovments and how useful can be to you and other people.

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kuyamarc wrote:
Anyways, I want to upload my AVR pictures here, but am very hesitant with fear that everyone here is going to laugh at me. Please provide me feedback on this topic. Thanks.

Kuya Marc

You post that avatar and label yourself as 'geek' and yet you profess to be afraid that folks will laugh at you?

Let's assume for a moment that you are sincere with your question. My answer is OF COURSE PEOPLE WILL LAUGH AT YOU - THIS IS THE INTERNET! To make matters worse, AVRFreaks is a nearly unmoderated forum. We have folks here who will not only laugh at you, if you give them the opportunity they will give you advice that will kill you if you take it.

The best way to succeed with microcontrollers is to grow a pair and use the Internet and sites like AVRFeaks using the good and ignoring the bad. At times it is like panning for gold in a stream of sewerage but it is also the best way to get the gold. If you really are afraid of being laughed at on the Internet, you'll just make your own life harder and the bastards win.

Smiley

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And finally you must know first yourself before you meet and know other people and expose yourself to them.
In this case exposing yourself to internet is even worst since you are open to any critisism,wrong advices,offensive behaviour,rude and you must be able to handle this and be able to separate the good from the bad since one seems to appear instead the other.

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Go ahead and laugh at mine:

http://sites.google.com/site/dan...

And

http://sites.google.com/site/dan...

Who cares if people laugh? We're having fun or are doing something useful.

odokemono. I try to entice electrons to do my bidding.

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I do point-to-point wiring between components on perf-boards for almost all my projects. I've sold about five of these board/projects to people who are much more enchanted with the device's abilities than the look of the circuit board.

But I'm always embarrassed to sell perf-board projects. Instead I'm now just offering for sale the pre-programmed AVR IC (along with a CD containing the source, schematic, data sheets, and AVR development tools). Blank CDs are only about $0.12, so I fill it up with lots of AVR/digital/electronic stuff.

There are two big drawbacks to perf-boards. One, they look childish and goofy. People who don't do electronics will laugh at them. People want to see that fiberglass board with the hundreds of little cool metal lines and exotic, mysterious, magical components like resistors with bands of color that convey dark secrets to the initiated electronics wizards. Two, they take a LOT of time to build and troubleshoot. You aren't going to build a thousand copies of a device that has a hundred-plus solder connections. Stuffing a through-hole PCB with components or mounting and soldering surface-mount components on a PCB is much faster to build and troubleshoot. And making more than a thousand units brings the economies-of-scale that pick'n'place machines make available.

But designing a PCB takes skill and sometimes expensive software. Getting a PCB made is expensive in small quantities, with sometimes the board costing more than the rest of the components. Rework is a real pain to do, and expensive to pay for.

Hey, at least you're using a perf-board. Some people try to build circuits without any fiberglass board. I'm done it, but I don't do it anymore. Bending the pins out from a DIP and soldering the resistors and capacitors and LEDs into an electronic sculpture. This is more of a one-of-a-kind art piece than an electronic device. And, again, you can't profitably make thousands of them.

The economics of the electronics industry are brutal. The parts are cheap: the engineers are expensive. The programmers are real expensive unless you're using open-source. Then engineering consulting for modification of the open-source to any specific application is expensive. Nothing becomes profitable until many thousands of a specific design are sold. And people expect the price to constantly fall for any given level of electronic performance. Nobody makes money doing electronics as a hobby. At best you can use it to get a real job that might pay a living wage. (and doing something that your kids think is cool). At the least you're doing something interesting that keeps you off the streets committing crimes and being a neighborhood pest.

But when you show off the long hours of study and troubleshooting that you have put into your home-made electronic devices, your friends and family are just going to smile wanly and despair. When you're out of earshot, they will sigh and say 'what a shame, he had so much potential when he was growing up' and 'maybe we should do -something- that might help'.

Actually the people here at AVRfreaks are probably the least likely people in the world to laugh at any home-made electronics. If it does something, and it does what you designed it to do, and it still works after two months and after being dropped twice, then be proud of it and show it off. Bring it to job interviews.

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Thanks to all of those comments. It's 10AM in the morning, here in the Philippines, just woke up. A few months ago, on local site, I was degraded because I wasn't doing SMTs and high-speed wireless communications, and was not making my own pre-etched boards. I guess, being an American citizen in the Philippines, people expect me to make space-age projects.

My past AVR Project page, showing off my 12 AVR boards, did get a lot of "Tweets", but I shut down my blog, yesterday.

Thanks for all of the feedback.

Kuya Marc

Aspiring Digital Graphics Artist & Illustrator

Retired Embedded Speech Synthesis Systems Developer

Due to emotional trauma in 2014, I have stopped working with embedded electronics!

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Just to add further to the previous posts:

No-one with experience creating stuff is ever going to laugh at the tools and materials used in your creations.
It's the ingenuity that you demonstrate that impresses.
In fact, the less fancy these tools and materials are in creating something ingenious, the more impressive the creation can be.

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JimK wrote:
Just to add further to the previous posts:

No-one with experience creating stuff is ever going to laugh at the tools and materials used in your creations.
It's the ingenuity that you demonstrate that impresses.
In fact, the less fancy these tools and materials are in creating something ingenious, the more impressive the creation can be.

Thanks very much for the confidence.

Attachment(s): 

Aspiring Digital Graphics Artist & Illustrator

Retired Embedded Speech Synthesis Systems Developer

Due to emotional trauma in 2014, I have stopped working with embedded electronics!

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They look pretty good to me. A lot of work though. I like using standard boards that I connect to boards as you have used with IDC cables to mount all the interface stuff.
Anyway, well done!

Charles Darwin, Lord Kelvin & Murphy are always lurking about!
Lee -.-
Riddle me this...How did the serpent move around before the fall?

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LDEVRIES wrote:
They look pretty good to me. A lot of work though. I like using standard boards that I connect to boards as you have used with IDC cables to mount all the interface stuff.
Anyway, well done!

Thanks! IDC cables... "IDC cables" wasn't in my technical vocabulary, I just called them, "rectangular connectors." It was ProtoStack that introduced me to AVR with USBasp. I just created my own interfaces with parts available locally.

Marc

Aspiring Digital Graphics Artist & Illustrator

Retired Embedded Speech Synthesis Systems Developer

Due to emotional trauma in 2014, I have stopped working with embedded electronics!

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kuyamarc wrote:
Thanks to all of those comments. It's 10AM in the morning, here in the Philippines, just woke up. A few months ago, on local site, I was degraded because I wasn't doing SMTs and high-speed wireless communications, and was not making my own pre-etched boards. I guess, being an American citizen in the Philippines, people expect me to make space-age projects.

My past AVR Project page, showing off my 12 AVR boards, did get a lot of "Tweets", but I shut down my blog, yesterday.

Thanks for all of the feedback.

Kuya Marc

well, if you want to sell boards like that, perhaps it is not a bad idea to have PCB's made. I'm 100% convinced that that will be cheaper then soldering every board like in the picture. Also if a boadr fails at a 'customer' then it for sure is not a wire that broke off

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check out Sparkfun's batch pcb service.
http://batchpcb.com/index.php/Pr...
for a low cost way to do pcbs. You'll need to download the free version of Eagle cad to make your gerber files (though any pcb design software that produces gerbers will do).

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kscharf wrote:
check out Sparkfun's batch pcb service.
http://batchpcb.com/index.php/Pr...
for a low cost way to do pcbs. You'll need to download the free version of Eagle cad to make your gerber files (though any pcb design software that produces gerbers will do).

Thanks for the suggestion. I'm only doing the boards as a hobby; not looking into mass production. Besides, I'm in the Philippines, and already had many offers to have pre-etched boards made.

Aspiring Digital Graphics Artist & Illustrator

Retired Embedded Speech Synthesis Systems Developer

Due to emotional trauma in 2014, I have stopped working with embedded electronics!

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meslomp wrote:
well, if you want to sell boards like that, perhaps it is not a bad idea to have PCB's made. I'm 100% convinced that that will be cheaper then soldering every board like in the picture. Also if a boadr fails at a 'customer' then it for sure is not a wire that broke off

Not into selling my boards. Each one has been drop tested and subjected to high RFI, and can communicate with each other via I2C, which is part of my undisclosed AI Robotics project.

Aspiring Digital Graphics Artist & Illustrator

Retired Embedded Speech Synthesis Systems Developer

Due to emotional trauma in 2014, I have stopped working with embedded electronics!

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Hello Kuya,

I also want to extend encouragement to you. Keep going.

A small suggestion; if you go to the Off Topic area you will see a "sticky" thread entitled "Post photos of your AVR based project!". That is the best place to display your projects. Then they can be found more easily in the future. If you look at some of the past contributions you will see that there is a wide standard ... all of which are welcome.

Cheers,

Ross

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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it looks like your a keen avr freak :-) I would like to know what your projects do, it might give me some ideas for a website I have, dedicated to entry level avr projects.

http://sites.google.com/site/ang...

by the way, I have a degree in electrical engineering and grad dip in psycholgy, now working on a grad dip in legal studies and I really enjoy building entry level avr projects. its a challenge to create a reliable design with minimal cost.

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Nothing wrong with perf boards, I use them al the time, they are great stuff because you can build about any circuit on them with very limited tools. And if you've made a mistake in the schematic, or want to add something later it's pretty easy.

I start most of my projects on a breadboard to test if it kinda works, but breadboards are pretty unreliable and not fit for anything which has to last for more than a few weeks.

If you look at this hack:
http://hackaday.com/2011/01/01/c...

then most reactions say it's pretty cool, not that it's stupid in any way.

If I read simonetta's post on perf boards then in the same line of thought you can say that cars are dangerous because they go to fast. Or that a screwdriver is useless because you can't use it to drive in nails.

Any technology has it's own use and limits.

Doing magic with a USD 7 Logic Analyser: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment/2421756#comment-2421756

Bunch of old projects with AVR's: http://www.hoevendesign.com