Which AVR do you prefer?

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I'm curious as to the AVR selection process of others. I know the obvious answer is "It Depends on the application." But, which one part is your starting point? Which part is your staple?

Do you wonder why Atmel even makes a 4K part when you can have 16K? Or, is cost your biggest concern?

Which part are you most comfortable using and you know like "the back of your hand?"

Are you using a part because it came with the development kit, or did you scour over the data sheets for the feature set you thought ideal or universal?

What package do you prefer? Is power your main focus?

Which AVRs are useless in your mind?

official AVR Consultant
www.veruslogic.com

Last Edited: Fri. Apr 24, 2009 - 04:41 PM
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mega168 (closely followed by mega16)

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Too much depends on the app to have a favourite. Certainly a Mega64 wouldn't be used where a Tiny25 will do. We've designed apps with most of the AVR "mainstream" families, but none [yet] with the "boutique" families like AT90PWM and AT90USB. Not averse; just hasn't arisen. And our volumes are modest so every penny doesn't really matter, and months to squeeze into a smaller model are not justified.

That said, I'll list some editorial comments:

-- We used to do some '2313 apps when it was the de-facto "Tiny". Real UART for apps like a remote display. Enough pins for a DIP switch bank. Like that. With the current lineup those USART apps use a Mega48--not much cost penalty and so much more resources and subsystems.

-- We used to do some Mega162 apps, just to get the twin U(S)ARTs. No longer; Mega164 family has all the new toyz, is a bigger family, has an ADC, and is less expensive.

-- Similarly, we have Mega64 apps as a not-too-pricey dual USART alternative with ADC and more memory than the '162. Now if we don't need the pin count it would probably be a '324.

-- Tiny25 family is nice for low pin count. Many seem to swear by the Tiny13; I use the same reasons as with '2313 vs '48: Little price penalty; bigger family; modern toyz; more resources.

-- The Mega8/88 is nice as a "value" model with a full 1kB of SRAM that is very convenient in some apps.

-- The Mega640 is a great value in centipedes, as it is quite inexpensive yet has the full SRAM & EEPROM space of the larger family members.

By both number of production apps and annual AVR usage I'd say that fully 1/2 are Mega8/48/88.

As far as size goes, we can usually predict the right model. Once in a while a Mega48 grows into an '88. Once in a while an existing app is updated/enhanced and the now "full" AVR model clicks to the next size.

I cannot think of a single one of our apps that uses the largest family member other than the Mega162 and that family is somewhat dysfunctional.

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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The mega 48 is my workhorse. I started with the AT90S2313, but that went away, and like you the Mega48 was the obvious replacement.

If my product is going to have a bootloader, then I move up to the 88 because of the protected area and the BOOTRST fuse the 48 does not have.

I have a Tiny13 application out there that has only 2 code bytes free in the flash. There is an application in mind for the new Tiny10 too.

Why the 16 when there is the 164? Why the 8 when there is the 88?

official AVR Consultant
www.veruslogic.com

Last Edited: Fri. Apr 24, 2009 - 08:19 PM
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All of my work has been on USB devices, and for that the AT90USB line is a great fit. The '162 is what I've used primarily since size and cost have been critical. There are several larger options, and even one smaller in the '82. Although the '82 doesn't have much program space... particularly if you want a USB bootloader.

-Brad

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I have used the tiny11 to the mega128 and the 90usb1287.

I tend to pick a model that just fits what I need for an app. I have no special favourite, but my apps are usually small anyway so I tend to favour the little 8/14/20 pin ones.

Why the m8 when there is an m88? The price difference might be a deciding factor in a commercial app.

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Quote:

Why the 16 when there is the 168?

Apples and oranges. You mean the '164?
Quote:

Why the 8 when there is the 88?

Quote:

The price difference might be a deciding factor in a commercial app.

It might, but when you get to "real" quantities where a few cents matter Atmel (through the distributor or direct) will probably give you pricing on what it costs to produce. Die sizes; yield; and the like.

I also was a bit surprised that there are no noises about the Mega8 once the '88 got into full production. I can only speculate that as a very popular model there is justification for these customers to not have to change models.

Perhaps the same with the '16 and '164. They did just do a die shrink on the '16/'32. I'd take that as an indication that it will not immediately disappear. [Is a die shrink always a "safe" drop-in replacement, though? Inquiring minds want to know.]

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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I like which-ever one fits the project.

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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I was involved in a project way back where the die shrink was not a drop in. IIRC the shrunk part was more susceptible to ESD.

official AVR Consultant
www.veruslogic.com

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For hobby projects it mostly comes down to availability for me rather than ideal technical fit. I've got a number of mega88's, so they're a good starting point where possible.

As far as I can I design around what I've got because buying AVRs is not easy. Local sellers have a limited range available unless you're buying large quantities. I consider Futurlec as good as local as their shipping costs are cheaper even than companies in my own city, but their range of surface mount devices is not as broad as I'd like. When I lived in the US I used to be able to get parts from Digikey, but they're not practical from here unless I'm doing a bulk order as they want US$42 to ship a $1.50 part to Australia.

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I'm not a professional with avrs and therefore my choice is limited.

I use the attiny2313 a lot because I grew up with the at90s2313 (and the tiny programs a lot faster).

When I run out of flash I switch to the ATMEGA8 But I don't like that part much because it has no usable 8-bit port. The only 8-bit port it has is shared with the uart which I use for almost every project. The AD converter is cool though.

When I need a lot of pins I use the ATMEGA16 or 32.

I bought about 25 ATTINY at Futurlec some years ago
The ATMEGA8 is real cheap at http://www.tuxgraphics.org/ so I bought a batch of those.
The ATMEGA16's I have have piggybacked on a big order for my brother (They're from Mouser)

I have 2 or three ATMEGA32's which I bought at a local shop (expensive). I save those for when I run out of flash in a ATMEGA16.

I have about 70 AVR's on stock and I try to do everything with those 3 (4) models.

If you're curious what I do with them have a look at:
http://members.ziggo.nl/paulvdh/

Have Fun, Paul.

Doing magic with a USD 7 Logic Analyser: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment/2421756#comment-2421756

Bunch of old projects with AVR's: http://www.hoevendesign.com

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Where did you get that tiny2313 in DIP-116?

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my favourite is the mega128.

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My staple is m8.
The later m88 is not recomended for new designs.
I keep on the look out for something faster.
I dont mean a bit I mean a lot.
Like 200MHz not 20.
Not much point in changing untill I get it.
Dont quite know why 8 bit have to be so slow.
Even new small ones.

John

If all else fails, read the instructions.

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Quote:

The later m88 is not recomended for new designs.

Only because it's been replaced by the lower power, lower cost mega88PA workalike.

The m88/m88PA is just so much better in so many ways than the old m8 (one thing is debugWire)

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I have used 90S2313, ATTiny2313, Mega8 and Mega88. Current design is to use Mega88 ... but as others have said ... depends upon the requirements.

Cheers,

Ross

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Paulvdh wrote:
I use the attiny2313 a lot ...

If you're curious what I do with them have a look at:
http://members.ziggo.nl/paulvdh/

Paul,

I love the way that you have stretched the tiny2313 to suit your needs. :roll:

Attachment(s): 

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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My first AVR was 90S2313, later ATMega8, now ATMega128. For most of my projects I use ATMega8, because it’s small, cheap, and have everything I need. I switched to ATMega128 because I started to write LCD GUI, which needs a lot of resources, especially SRAM, and it takes less space to use bigger chip than to interface external memory. Now maybe I will give a try to chips which have build-in CAN interface.

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My staple at the moment is the old 8535 as I have so many of them, as well as the old 2313. I am using the mega 64 and the 128 in a few designs as well.

But as has been posted before the best micro is the one that does the job. I would not use a mega 128 for a tiny13 project.

My design rule is to figure out the micro best suited to te task, and then look for the one slightly 'bigger'. This way should you need to add functionality, the engine is already there.

Jim

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Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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For my current projects, I'm using the 3250, mainly due to the amount of I/O and the 8 due to the cost and size. I use the 168 when I need to go to 20MHz or the 164 for the 2 uarts.

I usually start my choice based on the I/O and features that I need, and go with the largest memory I can afford (not an issue if I am making 10-100 boards but when I do a 200K piece run, cost adds up). For home projects, I also choose based on what's in my parts bins...