Where is the pinout summary??

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Hello. Every microprocessor I have ever used, in the first few pages of the DS, there is a chart showing all the pins down one side, then all their functions in the chart. There are columns for USART, SPI, etc.

 

I am trying to start a project with ATXMEGA32D4-AU. The DS shows a graphical pin map with PA1... ect, but there is no summary. It looks like you have to actually flip through 8 different sections of a 300+ page DS to make sure your UART and SPI pins aren't doubled up.

 

I always start a project on this chart noting what I will use the pins for.

 

Thank you.

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Last Edited: Thu. Aug 15, 2019 - 10:14 PM
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kjav wrote:
but there is no summary
Are you sure?

 

 

 

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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Thank you. Going straight to chapter 28 is where I usually look for this chart in a DS. lol.

 

Atmel is all about the Tribal Knowledge. It's there, you just have to know a local to point it out. wink

They couldn't just put it at the top of the DS like every other device manufacturer.

 

Thank you.

Last Edited: Thu. Aug 15, 2019 - 10:15 PM
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kjav wrote:
Atmel is all about the Tribal Knowledge
Well, that's rubbish.  I didn't know where it was.  I doubt most here would.  I've never even used this device, nor any xmega device.

 

I do, however, know how to drive my PDF viewer.  I simply looked for 'port' and then 'alternate' in the table of contents.  Took me about eight seconds.  Another 20 to take screenshots and post here.

 

Does your PDF viewer not allow searching the table of contents?  The body text?

 

50% of engineering is knowing >>how<< to find information, not >>where<< to find information.

 

kjav wrote:
Thank you.
Glad to help.

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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joeymorin wrote:
and then 'alternate'
Which is "tribal knowledge" cheeky

 

(just playing devils advocate but it does help to know that most AVR datasheets have a section called "alternate pin mapping")

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clawson wrote:

Which is "tribal knowledge"

Nope.  Just >>my<< knowledge.

 

I could just as easily have found it with the keyword 'pinout', the very word the OP said was not findable.  In fact, that's the name of the chapter in which you'll find 28.2 Alternate pin functions:

 

 

Note how my PDF viewer shows an active search of topics as I type 'pinout'.

 

28.2 is two pages later on page 51.

 

clawson wrote:
just playing devils(sic) advocate
I can respect that ;-)

 

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

Last Edited: Fri. Aug 16, 2019 - 01:05 PM
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While we are on the topic, well sort of anyway, it is probably worth mentioning that the Xmega chips have their data split across two documents.

There is one for the Family of chips, and one for the specific chip.

 

JC

 

 

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The one for the family explains all the I/O devices and their registers.  It's called the "manual".  It's all I need to write the various device drivers. 

 

For pinouts and the amount of memory, you need the "data sheet" for each size chip.

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A lot of the newer chips have their multi-purpose pins described in a table in a section "I/O Multiplexing and Considerations", but it's a toss-up whether those are in a "family" datasheet (the SAMD21 chips have a single datasheet with a table that includes "all" of the pinouts) or in individual datasheets for a particular package (The ATmega4809 has a "Mega0 family datasheet" that doesn't seem to mention pinouts at all, and then separate datasheets for the SMT and DIP versions that does...)