Where to get MAC address for WIZNET module?

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#1
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Anyone has any idea where can I purchase MAC address for Wiznet module? I need about 100-1000 MAC address.

Where can I buy one?

cs

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The MAC address is usually burnt-in/provided by the manufacturer of the device. I'd expect the Wiznet modules to come with a MAC address.

Which Wiznet module are you talking about (there are several models) ?

Why do you think you need to provide your own MAC address ?

Markus

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WIZNET 812MJ. No MAC address.

This is a big trouble for me to look for a valid MAC address.

Anyone using Wiznet module and how do you solve the MAC address problem?

cs

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Looking at the 812MJ data sheet I find not much mention about this at all. You may be right. You have several choices:

1) Contact wiznet for advice
2) Contact the IEEE to get a range (http://standards.ieee.org/develop/regauth/oui/public.html)
3) Just pick one (look at the IEEE website for a suitable/unused range)
This is fine for a hobby project, *not* for a product !

Markus

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have you Googled? Start here by the look of it

http://standards.ieee.org/develo...

Or for a one off, find an old/broken network card.

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You can buy them from Microchip, available in SOIC or SOT-23, for about 22 cents.
/mike

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n1ist wrote:
You can buy them from Microchip, available in SOIC or SOT-23, for about 22 cents.
/mike

Yup, I found the node address chip from Microchip. But no DIP version.Surface mount need very high volume...
Which one easier to hand solder? SOT-23 or SOIC?

Also found Dallas DS2502-E48 which contains the EUI-48, in easy TO-92 packaging. But very expensive and not available in Farnell...

cs

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markus_b wrote:
Looking at the 812MJ data sheet I find not much mention about this at all. You may be right. You have several choices:

1) Contact wiznet for advice
2) Contact the IEEE to get a range (http://standards.ieee.org/develop/regauth/oui/public.html)
3) Just pick one (look at the IEEE website for a suitable/unused range)
This is fine for a hobby project, *not* for a product !

I need to use the MAC address for a product. Low volume though...

cs

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MartinM57 wrote:
have you Googled? Start here by the look of it

http://standards.ieee.org/develo...

Or for a one off, find an old/broken network card.

How to find 100-1000 broken network cards? :shock:

cs

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The first 3 octets are the Organizationally Unique Identifier, which is a block of 16 million addresses assigned to a manufacturer. The last 3 octets are the device unique part... increments from 00-00-00 to ff-ff-ff. Note that least significant bit of the first octet indicates broadcast. So just pick an OUI like 00-11-22 then start numbering your modules 00-00-00 thru whatever.

Imagecraft compiler user

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Hi CS,

I used the Wiznet a few years back, but only as a hobbyist. In that case, I used the MAC from an old PC NIC.

Since you appear to want to make many of these, I agree with Markus, you'll have to contact the IEEE.

Michael Jamet

Michael Jamet

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Are there IEEE police that will sic their lawyers on you if you bootleg 100 numbers from someone else's OUI?
I betcha there is little to no correlation between the OUI name and the company name for most generic ethernet cards. Go buy a 'diamond flower' card and see what OUI it uses. Betcha it don't say Diamond Flower. It doesn't matter because your device will be on a private subnet where the rest of the world wont get confused by one rogue ethernet card.

Imagecraft compiler user

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bobgardner wrote:
The first 3 octets are the Organizationally Unique Identifier, which is a block of 16 million addresses assigned to a manufacturer. The last 3 octets are the device unique part... increments from 00-00-00 to ff-ff-ff. Note that least significant bit of the first octet indicates broadcast. So just pick an OUI like 00-11-22 then start numbering your modules 00-00-00 thru whatever.

From Wikipedia:-

Universally administered and locally administered addresses are distinguished by setting the second least significant bit of the most significant byte of the address. If the bit is 0, the address is universally administered. If it is 1, the address is locally administered. In the example address 06-00-00-00-00-01 the most significant byte is 06 (hex), the binary form of which is 00000110, where the second least significant bit is 1. Therefore, it is a locally administered address.[4] Consequently, this bit is 0 in all OUIs


If the least significant bit of the most significant octet of an address is set to 0 (zero), the frame is meant to reach only one receiving NIC.[5] This type of transmission is called unicast. A unicast frame is transmitted to all nodes within the collision domain, which typically ends at the nearest network switch or router. Only the node with the matching hardware MAC address will accept the frame; network frames with non-matching MAC-addresses are ignored, unless the device is in promiscuous mode


What is the difference between unicast and multicast?

cs

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bobgardner wrote:
Are there IEEE police that will sic their lawyers on you if you bootleg 100 numbers from someone else's OUI?
I betcha there is little to no correlation between the OUI name and the company name for most generic ethernet cards. Go buy a 'diamond flower' card and see what OUI it uses. Betcha it don't say Diamond Flower. It doesn't matter because your device will be on a private subnet where the rest of the world wont get confused by one rogue ethernet card.

Yes, but it will be very embarrased if my client found that Im using a "steal" MAC address which collide with their existing ethernet card. Of course, the chances that happen almost close to zero....Less than the chance to strike a PowerBall.

Anyone knows any Ethernet card maker company gone bust already? Perhaps I can use their OUI?

cs

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brooklynrobots wrote:
Hi CS,

I used the Wiznet a few years back, but only as a hobbyist. In that case, I used the MAC from an old PC NIC.

Since you appear to want to make many of these, I agree with Markus, you'll have to contact the IEEE.

Michael Jamet

Hi Michael, 100-1000 units not really "many"... Actually this is a very small volume...IEEE require you to purchase a lot...They wont bother about 100-1000 MAC address....

cs

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Hi again, CS,

You're right 1000 is not a lot. So it's not clear how you get a small block. I've never tried.

As for multicast vs unicast...

Unicast is for point to point communications. Multicast is a similar to broadcast. A group of machines can join a multicast group and then a transmitter can send just to that group. It is more fine grained than broadcast. Multicast is helped along by hardware on the network interface so, if a machine is not in a multicast group that's being addressed, the hardware throws the transmission away and the cpu is never even interrupted.

Hoping this is clear,
Michael Jamet

Michael Jamet

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vendor list

Attachment(s): 

Imagecraft compiler user

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Here a couple of candidates to borrow their OUI:

00000F  NeXT
000046  Olvtti
08002B  DEC
aa0000  DEC0
aa0001  DEC1
aa0002  DEC2
aa0003  DEC3
aa0004  DEC4

There is also plenty of unused space. I'd use that instead of borrowing and ID.

Markus

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Why not use a local MAC address, as the wikipedia qoute surgests ?

I use a fixed first byte, and the last 5bytes come from an onboard DS2401.

So the address is fairly unique, and local so it should not conflict with other mass produced items.

(I have less than 100items out in the real world using this atm)

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markus_b wrote:
Here a couple of candidates to borrow their OUI:

00000F  NeXT
000046  Olvtti
08002B  DEC
aa0000  DEC0
aa0001  DEC1
aa0002  DEC2
aa0003  DEC3
aa0004  DEC4

There is also plenty of unused space. I'd use that instead of borrowing and ID.

Great! NeXT is dead, perhaps I will use NeXT OUI. Thanks Markus and Steve Jobs..

cs

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Yeah. Thanks Marcus.

Imagecraft compiler user

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bobgardner wrote:
Yeah. Thanks Marcus.

Thanks Bob, Michael, Markus,Mora, Martin, ....everyone :)

Thanks a lot. Problem solved (for now). Hopefully I will face this problem soon...

cs

I'm happy ytd, today, and tmr :)

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BTW, any easy method to keep track of the MAC address that I used? Thinking to use Excel...but I think it will be very messy after sometime...

1000 is very small for machine, but A LOT for human like me :)

cs

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If there is a zero chance of two of em ever showing up on the same subnet, just make em all 00-11-22-00-00-00

Imagecraft compiler user

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I would combine the MAC with the serial number. There are several threads on how to program chips with a serial number on avrfreaks. Several tools can be used, depending on your setup.

Markus

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The standard has a user-defined range. I use that plus the lower order bytes are a number tied to the MAC address of another wireless NIC. But that could be any numbering you manage to prevent duplicates. This is fine if the devices are never connected to a public IP network, but rather are static addresses in a non-public LAN.