Where to buy scope probe connector?

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Hi - I'm looking to pick up a PCB mount scope probe connector. What, you say? Yeah, I have no idea what they're called.

They're little vertical connectors that allow you to plug a scope probe into a PCB. As in, not the BNC side of the scope probe - the other side. You take off the hat (or whatever it is called) and you then just plug the pointy end of the probe into your PCB. It makes contact with both the signal and ground lines on the probe.

Any ideas?

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I've never seen those for sale separately. Tektronix has had them for (some of) their probes. Whether they still do or not, I don't know. I would also expect that you would have to get ones that are specific for your particular probe. The tolerances are moderately tight and you can't just get use any arbitrary one with any arbitrary probe.

No, I don't know what they are called.

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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Hmm - looks like Tek part # 131-4353-00 is the right one for the 5mm probes (what I have). More info here: http://www2.tek.com/cmswpt/psdet...

4 bucks each with a minimum order of 25! Ouch! Anything cheaper out there?

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nleahcim wrote:
4 bucks each with a minimum order of 25! Ouch! Anything cheaper out there?
HP has similar prices.

I was once chastised here for suggesting DIY resistive probes, so I'll leave it as an issue between you and Google. Just let me mention that you can chose between literally thousands of connector types when building your DIY resistive probe head. Everything that meets your frequency requirements and where PCB receptacles are available is fair game.

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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I have built solder-in probe adaptors. Like this:

1) one piece of heavy wire (maybe 16 gauge). Form it into about 1.5 to 2 loops of a circle that the ground part of the probe nose will snugly fit into. Bend the remaining wire at right angles (so that it is an extension of a radius of the circle). Cut it off to be about 1/4" long.

2) one piece of smaller gauge wire (maybe 26 gauge). Form it into a couple of loops of a circle that the tip of the probe will just fit into (think tightly wound spring). It may be easiest to form the wire on a mandrel (say, the shank of a drill bit). Trim the loose end to no more than 1/2" in length.

3. You simply solder these two pieces into your circuit at the appropriate points. No special layout needed. Soldering on SMT board may be easier if you make a little "L" bend on the end of each wire. Then solder right at the end of a convenient resistor or capacitor.

This works pretty well up to 500MHz or 1ns rise times. Not the absolute best but quick and low cost.

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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alwelch's idea would work several ways.
- BNC PCB socket into probe's BNC-to-tip adapter.
- Lower bandwidth scopes have an input impedance of 1 Meg-ohm // approx. 10 pF; if input impedance is OK, use BNC cable between BNC PCB socket and scope.
- Probe tip into BNC PCB socket center contact; copper tape to bridge probe ground to BNC ground?

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller