What was your first micro programming experience?

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I'll tell you mine (and date myself).

 

Back in the mid 70s the price of 8080As had finally dropped down to something a student could afford, at $39.95 (James Electronics).  So I drove down there and bought one, along with the 8224 and 8228 support chips.  I wired the chips together on a large protoboard along with 16 bytes (yes!) of TTL memory (2 16x4 chips, part number now lost to memory) and some LEDs.  For programming the whole thing I built a box with some 7-segment displays and some octal thumbwheel switches I found in a surplus store.  Yes, we were all doing octal back then!  My first program was, yes, an LED blinky program - actually an LED counter program.  It fit into 16 bytes with a whole byte or two to spare!  And just like that, I was hooked.

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I started on the company's Motorola Exorciser development system around 1979?? with the 6800 chip, it was a "luxurious" system with paper tape reader for both the assembler and the editor, around 1 hour loading time!

 

But most of my early work was done with the Signetic's 2650 because one of my workmates was moving to a S100 board so he donated the Electronics Australia magazine designed board to me, 1K EPROM with the monitor program in it and 1K ram.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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I think back then most of us separated pretty decisively into the 8080 or 6800 camps.  I remember thinking, in my vast ignorance, that the 6800 was pretty lame because it had fewer registers (although looking back I think it was probably a nicer chip to program).  Then the 6502 came out with its unbelievably limited register set, and I ended up writing my largest assembly program on it, the Syncalc spreadsheet.  That's when I finally accepted processor multilingualism as a good thing.

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Speaking of paper tape readers, I somehow got ahold of a 6800 paper tape BASIC, so I built a 6800 board and built a paper tape reader with photo-transistors set in perfboard, and the light source was a desk lamp.  I loaded BASIC a few times but was never able to get it to run completely.  I think that's about when the Z-80 came out, and I quickly followed its siren song.

 

EDIT: BTW, by then I was using 4k x 1 dynamic memory chips that I had blowtorched out of surplus memory boards.  I could get 16k x 8 on one S-100 board.

Last Edited: Mon. Jul 22, 2019 - 12:35 AM
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Yep, like John, it was initially the Exorciser and then our own 6803 and then 6809 boards. The "good old days"...

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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kk6gm wrote:
I think back then most of us separated pretty decisively into the 8080 or 6800 camps.
in college then RCA CDP1802 (CMOS instead of NMOS)

https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/philae#comment-1369021

Microprocessors & Peripherals | Renesas Electronics

Harsh Environment

 

...

CDP1802A

...

80C86

...

CDP1802ACD3 Renesas / Intersil | Mouser

CP80C86-2Z Renesas / Intersil | Mouser

 

edit :

The avionics version of CP80C86 is MD80C86.

https://octopart.com/search?q=MD80C86&avg_avail=(1__*)&start=0

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Mon. Jul 22, 2019 - 01:20 AM
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I, too, had an 8080 in the mid-late 1970's.

I was in college and a bunch of us all chipped in to get the PCB made, which was quite expensive back then.

I didn't design the schematic or the PCB, but I ended up debugging several non-working boards assembled by others.

It had the interrupt controller, USART, Baud rate, and timer chips on the board, ram chips, two EEPROM sockets, and some expansion ports.

One EEPROM held the monitor program.

It took a lot of support chips to make a working micro back then.

 

I just looked for it in the basement, but I couldn't find it.

My basement flooded a few years ago, and I lost a lot of stuff, and had a bunch of stuff "reorganized".

Perhaps it will show up some time.

 

In the late 1970's I took a microcontroller class and lab.

Each lab station had a big box to work on, with some I/O ports accessible for interfacing stuff.

I truly just can't remember the micro, but I know it was an Intel chip.

 

I also had an original, kit, Sinclair ZX80, (and one or two Timex/Sinclair ZX81's, eventually).

It, too, is not locatable within the basement.

 

The first micro that I recall using for stand-alone projects, designed from the board up, used the Basic Stamp module.

That was in the early 1980's IIRC.

 

If I find the missing items I'll add a photo or two.

 

JC

 

Edit:

I do still have an old ASR33 Teletype terminal in the basement, complete with a paper tape punch / reader!

 

Edit, (Again!):

Yes, EPROM, not EEPROM.

I remember using the UV eraser and the glass window on the chips.

 

JC

Last Edited: Mon. Jul 22, 2019 - 09:58 PM
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Started with 68000 which we used for embedded programming lessons at school. In parallel I played a bit with a 8051 variant.

After years and years not doing anything with it I played a bit with a pic controller that I no longer know the number of. I do know the tools then were a PIA which most likely made me stop.

Then at work a bit of C codeing on a NEC processor, but only high level application stuff ( needed to test a receiver chip but the FW guys had no time to help me, so I said give me a processor board ( which turned out to be a full existing project, hahahaha and the source code and made a special project which had MSL-stuf.c were I could do my thing.

and finally at my previous job they worked with the mega128/ mega64 and mega168. There I got really interested again, and as at my current job we also use these chips and I could get hardware to play with and help from colleagues I now work with these a lot.

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Like most folks - late 70's. In my case a kit built Cosmac 1802 with 256 bytes RAM and no ROM whatsoever (1802 had a clever DMA mechanism which meant that bytes latched from a hex keypad could simply be "clocked in" to the RAM).

 

Next up was a Sinclair ZX80. We ordered the day the first advert appeared (PCW magazine) and got unit number 000385.

 

Also had Tangerine Microtan 65 and Acorn Atom around then too. (technically the Microtan was my twin brother's and the Atom was mine).

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It had the interrupt controller, USART, Baud rate, and timer chips on the board, ram chips, two EEPROM sockets, and some expansion ports.

Brings back many memories (pun?)  I bet those were EPROM sockets...reason, in late '83 I was assigned a newbie task to evaluate the "brand new" EEPROM's that had literally just arrived on the scene, perhaps the year (or two) before.  I think I had some of the first samples (since we had a $$$ budget for some defense work).    My job was to report to management whether we could "bet" on on these newfangled parts.  I remember those ELF and 8080 boards, and throwin the switches to program routines that had to be completely re-entered, when things went haywire.   The sounds of wire-wraps guns happily filled the air & an unmarked cabinet had a "secret" coffee maker that was prohibited in the lab.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Around '76 or so, I was working for a company that operated video games in pubs. Atari and Midway started using microprocessors in their games, and the company sent me on a short course at some uni in London to learn about programming them.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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Mine was a 6800 kit from a San Antonio company called SWTPC or SouthWest Technical Products, that started out selling audio equipment. That first system had a rom monitor and 2k of ram.  Since real terminals were way too expensive, SWTPC had kitted a TV typewriter from a magazine article, it could display 16 lines of 32 characters on a b/w tv screen, later modified to display 16 x 64.  That little system grow from 6800 to 6809 with 768K of ram with four 5-1/4" floppies, two 8" floppies and color impact printer.  The old TV typewriter was soon replaced with a memory mapped video card, i/o includde serial ports, parallel port, eeprom burner, music (sound) card, and a vector graphics cards and more. 

At work I was introduced to and become manager of a PDP-11/45, that was used to cross compile Fairchild F8 and 8085 code which I wrote to support optical character recognition systems (OCR-A, OCR-B) used in check sorting machines, and POS price tag readers(Sears and JC Penney).  The RT-11 experience lead to VAX and later Alpha VMS systems management for over two decades.

Only after Y2k did I rediscover micro programming again using AVR's in small sensor and control systems. 

Today I'm mostly involved with PIC's in building automation systems with a little ARM linux just to keep me on my toes.

 

Jim

 

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from #3

I think back then most of us separated pretty decisively into the 8080 or 6800 camps.

Am I the only 6502 guy ?

My first computer was a commodore Pet in 1980, and very fast I was into ASM.   

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sparrow2 wrote:
Am I the only 6502 guy ?

Not hardly with all those apple ]['s and commodore systems out there!  

I too did some projects in 6502 assembler!

 

Jim

 

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sparrow2 wrote:
Am I the only 6502 guy ?
Nope I had Microtan 65 and Acorn Atom (the thing that eventually lead to ARM!) - both 6502.

 

The Atom was brilliant - it was BASIC but it had an exceedingly easy way to insert 6502 code segments. I wrote a whole Pacman in 6502 - the zero page was one of the nicest things ever - bit like having 256 accumulators! Even the BASIC was great having essentially PEEK/POKE operators as ? and !

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Martin Research "Mike 3" in 1976 at Junior College. The Electronics department had to be careful that vendors labeled them "Microprocessor Systems" otherwise, the Business Department would block the purchase.

 

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

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I did 6502, amongst many other chips.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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sparrow2 wrote:

from #3

I think back then most of us separated pretty decisively into the 8080 or 6800 camps.

Am I the only 6502 guy ?

My first computer was a commodore Pet in 1980, and very fast I was into ASM.   

No.   I started with Commodore Pet 3032 in 1980 or 1981.

 

Likewise,   I first bought an Assembler ROM and then wrote my own Assembler.

I bought the first Atari M68k.   And had to learn C.

 

I remember buying a Z80 SBC called MPF-1 as a foray into "embedded".   ASM keyed into a Monitor via HEX keypad.

But the first microcontroller was a Mitsubishi 740 which was a 6502 with peripherals. 

 

I was never brave enough to build hardware from scratch.    R6502 and M68000 will always be "favourite".

AVR and ARM might be capable designs but never with the same affection.

 

David.

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sparrow2 wrote:
Am I the only 6502 guy ?

Nah, but the 6502 came a couple of years after the 8080 and 6800 (about the time of the Z-80).  I distinctly remember the 8080 and 6800 being the main chips discussed in the magazines and offered in products for the first few years, until the KIM-1 started appearing in ads.  As I mentioned, having to program the 6502 after coming from the 8080 really taught me that there were very different ways to skin a micro cat.

Last Edited: Mon. Jul 22, 2019 - 02:41 PM
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6800 kit in mid-late '70s

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So, to this day what was everyone's favourite CPU architecture?

 

I've tried many and I liked things like two stacks on 6809 for implementing Forth. PDP11 had a nice auto increment indexing instruction and, as above, the 6502 had that really great zero page. The 68000 had wonderful homogenous instruction set (pretty much every op on every register) and ARM is nice for pretty much conditional everything. I did a lot of Asm for 8086/80286/8036 back in the day but the segmentation drove me bonkers. For me "best" has to be Z80 purely from use/exposure - I wrote Z80 Asm for 10+ years and used to be able to hand dis-assemble code (about all I remember 3+ decades later is 0x21 being LD HL,nnnnn :-(  that's what age does to brain cells!) but it was things like the wonderous EX (SP),HL and LDIR that really did it for me. The DD/FD thing for the hidden IX/IY things was kind of cool too.

 

(PS: AVR is nice too ;-)

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I thought the 6809 was a dream machine back when, and loved writing assembly on it.  I remember going to a Motorola presentation and bringing home a big stack of documentation on it and the 68000.  Never did program the 68000, but sure was excited about it as well (and that 64-pin DIP package, wow!).

 

Another chip I dreamed about was the CP1600 (instruction set a lot like the PDP-11).  I think it was the first 16-bit micro.  I actually bought one mounted on an IBM PC board.  It sure was a lot faster than the 8086.  Mostly I used it to run Mandelbrot programs - who remembers that craze?

Last Edited: Mon. Jul 22, 2019 - 04:12 PM
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BTW, did anybody else pour over these for countless hours?

 

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BTW, did anybody else pour over these for countless hours?

Got the 4/8 bit edition on a shelf a few feet away, along with some Rockwell AIM_65 (6502) books  & some CDP1802 data books. Buried under a bunch of empty cardboard boxes in a remote corner is a file cabinet I've had since around 1977---I used to collect all electronics & computer catalogs (including MITS catalogs)...I don't think I've opened it in 25 years (and even then it had sat 15 years), but certainly some oldies in in there.  I probably have some really old Polypaks & Digikey catalogs in there too.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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avrcandies wrote:
some really old Polypaks & Digikey catalogs

PolyPaks, they used to sell a 55 gal drum of misc parts (always assumed they were rejects and floor sweepings), never could figure out who would buy such a thing....

until I walked into my first electronics lab in college and guess what was by the door, yes a 55 gal drum of parts, and next to that was the curve tracer!

The first lab was how to use a curve tracer to find the semiconductor part you needed for the following labs.

Spent many spare hours identifying parts I needed and taping them into my lab note book.  I used to be pretty good at using a curve tracer, but that has faded......

 

Jim

 

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6809 early 1980s.

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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clawson wrote:
So, to this day what was everyone's favourite CPU architecture?

 

From the ones I know (Z80, x86, ARM, AVR and a bit of Xtensa) I have to say ARM (full ARM, not thumb) because of it's elegance. AVR comes 2nd. I guess I just like the simplicity of RISC.

And you are right, segmentation was (is) quite a mess in x86.

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I liked the 8096 (timeframe latter 80's) for some products we developed...those were fun times.  Working with the 8096 made my Apple II seem so slooow.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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El Tangas wrote:
And you are right, segmentation was (is) quite a mess in x86.
Indeed for assembly though hidden by a HLL.

Reading the Intel manuals was a learning experience though just enough assembly language to call "main" for an embedded 486.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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So, to this day what was everyone's favourite CPU architecture?

 

it's hard  but like cliff the zero page on the 6502 and clean instructions set of the 68000.

 

And then I will say I had a fun challenge programming a 4 bit Samsung LCD micro. (SAM4).

I think it was missing 48 instructions, that could be made into a combo of 2 one byte instructions, or 1 two byte instruction.

And if you had same kind of load instructions after each other, they would be executed as nop's (skip) so :

L1    LD    A,#5

L2    LD    A,#2

L3    LD    A,#1   

would leave A with 5 if you jump to L1 and 2 for L2 (a bit like the flags on a ARM7 in 32 bit mode).

 

and it had a skip if a function returned false (RET for normal and RETS for return false).

It had HW where bit's either could be part of a byte or flags in 8 address.  

 

I can tell you that that the code could be very compact :)

And with a good structure it was easy to read and write code for it.  

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90S1200.  As a UART to provide a serial bus interface to a bunch of dedicated logic chips.  I didn't dig 'down' to get into microcontrollers - I went up.  As a COF (cranky old fart) I still think of assembler as a 'high-level language'.  S.

 

Edited to add:  The best hardware architecture is the one I built for the job it had to do.  So there...  ;-P  S.

Last Edited: Mon. Jul 22, 2019 - 11:40 PM
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Motorola HC12 (assembly and C) was my first. Since then I've used Atmel AVR (C and C++), an Intel 8051 derivative (assembly), and the Parallax Propeller (assembly, Spin, C, and C++). The Atmel AVR is definitely my favorite out of these.

github.com/apcountryman/build-avr-gcc: a script for building avr-gcc

github.com/apcountryman/toolchain-avr-gcc: a CMake toolchain for cross compiling for the Atmel AVR family of microcontrollers

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2904 bit-slice for the win

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In mid 70’s, I started designing and selling simple light controllers (via triacs) for outdoor panels (of theatres, nightclubs, big stores...) by using discrete components only.

After about two years, I heard of TTL ICs and my boards became smaller with more functions.

Then, after hearing of EPROMs, most boards I sold consisted of a 555 timer, a CMOS counter, an EPROM and triac drivers.

The introduction of Z80 CPU in my local market (late 70’s) gave me the chance to build controllers for outdoor moving message signs. Although the project had to stop soon after I finished it, I used Z80 to build various industrial controllers for special tasks (besides the simple light controllers).

My last product which had Z80 was a standalone controller for satellite dish motor. The user could program it to accept its commands from any IR remote set he had. But its board was rather complex because I had to also include on it an EPROM programmer to save, during the last milliseconds (a few tens), 3 status bytes at mains cut-off. Yes, since the EPROM was 64K*8, the End of Life of the product would be after about 21,000 cut-offs :) assuming 2536 bytes for code. This was around mid 90’s when someone sent me the datasheet of AT89C51. By using this MCU, I had the chance to design also a smart dish positioner ;) which let the dish point at a satellite by just entering its angle (in degrees); as long it is between two satellites whose positions and angles were set properly...

 

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Of course, when we had nothing better to do, we'd mess around with our HP-41 & try out new "synthetic programming" tricks upon our pals.

 

https://www.hpmuseum.org/cgi-sys/cgiwrap/hpmuseum/archv005.cgi?read=9180

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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I lusted after assorted microcomputers, but they always seemed a bit out-of-reach.  Besides, I had mainframes to play with...  The COSMAC Elf was one of them; I wrote 1802 assembler, on paper, that was destined never to run...

 

In college, there were assorted CP/M and S100 systems floating around, but I was rather mainframe-bound.  But I was programming the mainframes in Assembly language, so "having my own computer" didn't seem like too much of a stretch.  (but still, there seemed to be more important things to spend money on.  So... lots of "book knowledge and exploration", not so much actual "micros."

 

(I'm not quite sure that these are in order:)

I wrote an 8085 emulator for the PDP-10, and typed in Kilobaud's Forth implementation to run on it.  I think it almost worked.  (the 8085 emulator later "inspired" a company to release a similar but greatly expanded "CP/M Emulator" for the same mainframe.

 

I guess somewhere in there, I keyed in the "kit car" blinking lights program to an Intel 8080 or 8008 box via front panel switches (once!), worked "lightly" on a "terminal" driver for the new video card in a Cromenco that was "around" (did you know that a raw video display doesn't understand "CR" or "LF"?), and played with a Votrax speech sythesizer.

 

But I guess the first actual "ran meaningful code on a micro" was when the EE Seniors got Intel SDK-86 boards that we had to assemble, and hopefully do something with.  (mind you, at this time, there was essentially an "EEs don't program" mentality.)  With my "fiddling" background, I shortly had my board scrolling "PLEASE HELP" across the 8279-controlled 7segment display, and the professor saw it and made me explain to the class how it worked...  I did my "Senior Design Project" based on that board - I added an Interrupt Controller (using SSL TTL) and an external ADC, implementing a "grab some timed samples" and a "voltmeter."  It was a bit toy-ish for such a project, IMO, but I'm probably lucky they didn't OK my "Async Serial Ring Network" proposal ("Too much software!"), which would have been biting off more than I could chew.

 

I wrote the mainframe side of an XMODEM file transfer protocol.  ( http://quux.org:70/Archives/usen... )

 

The mainframe side XMODEM got re-written for a different OS at my first job ( http://www.oocities.org/westfw/m... ), and was used by SIMTEL-20 to support US Army (and maybe other people) downloading of CP/M and MSDOS "shareware."

 

When the IBM-PC came out, I did a rather locally-specific client-side terminal emulator/download utility ( http://www.oocities.org/westfw/i... ), which I attempted to turn into a commercial venture that would have competed with the likes of CrossTalk version 1.  Unfortunately (or perhaps not), that failed rather spectacularly on the business side of things (all pre-production), leading me to learn quite a bit about software publishing, copyrights, and How to Pay a Lawyer.

 

The x86 background turned out to be pretty important in getting me my "forever job" as my favorite mainframes Went Away...

 

(I excitedly followed PICs and Basic Stamps and AVRs and BASIC52 and etc as they came out and/or were covered in the hobby magazines, but never really did anything with them; I was busy doing other things.  Likewise, my piecemeal CP/M system was never quite completed. (first it was going to use a serial connection instead of dialup, and then I gave up and ordered 8inch floppies (or maybe just 1?), and then the IBM PC came out and things moved REALLY FAST in that area...  Sigh.)

 

 

to this day what was everyone's favourite CPU architecture?

The PDP-10 (9bit opcodes!  SO many instructions, so elegantly structured)(didn't scale very well to larger memories, though), and the 68k for something more micro-y.

PDP-10 instruction set diagram

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6809 still my favourite. If someone made one with built-in memory and I/O, running at 16mHz, I'd still be using it.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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Dream 6800 with CHIPOS monitor and ASM. Early 80s.
Much later met the designer, Michael Bauer at his 40th (I think it was) birthday party.
Dusted it off and took it along with happy birthday running across the screen.

Last Edited: Tue. Jul 23, 2019 - 09:09 AM
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My most thumbed book was a copy of the Z80 opcodes but sadly I cannot find a picture of it online (and my actual copy must be hidden in a box in my loft these days) but in searching I was reminded of:

 

 

The Zaks book about Z80 was the "bible" in the same sense that K&R was/is to to C!

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John_A_Brown wrote:

6809 still my favourite. If someone made one with built-in memory and I/O, running at 16mHz, I'd still be using it.

Hellsyeah.

 

clawson wrote:

The Zaks book about Z80 was the "bible" in the same sense that K&R was/is to to C!

My brother and I called this 'the book':

https://www.google.com/search?q=Color+Computer+Assembly+Language+Programming+William+Barden

https://archive.org/details/Color_Computer_Assembly_Language_Programming_1983_William_Barden_Jr

 

Our copy looked very much more loved than that one.

 

Of course there was always this:

https://www.google.com/search?q=6809+Assembly+Language+Programming+lance+leventhal

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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Joey, I was going to post a photo of my copy of Lance's book, but couldn't lay my hand on my camera fast enough.

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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valusoft wrote:

Joey, I was going to post a photo of my copy of Lance's book, but couldn't lay my hand on my camera fast enough.

Do it anyway!  That's just a random jpg from the tubes... not a snap of my own copy... which is I don't know where...

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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joeymorin wrote:

John_A_Brown wrote:

 

6809 still my favourite. If someone made one with built-in memory and I/O, running at 16mHz, I'd still be using it.

 

Hellsyeah.

 

From what I gather, maybe it exists in an horribly mutated form as NXP's S12Z series. These register maps do show some similarities:

 

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You guys are going to make me find my 6809 programmers reference card now! 

Jim

 

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I'm actually quite surprised there are so many 6809 users. In what form did folks use them? 

 

In the UK your access to "micros" tended to be what designers had built into readily available kits or systems.

 

So for Z80 you had things like Nascom, TRS-80, Sinclair ZXs/Spectrums, Amstrad CPC's and PCWs,  Enterprise (anyone remember??), Jupiter Ace, Sharp MZ, Einstein.

For 6502 you had things like the Acorn machines (Atom, BBC-B), Commodore (C64, VIC20, PET), UK101, Microtan 65, Oric. 

 

But for 6809 the only one I can actually remember was the Dragon.

 

So did everyone get their 6809 fix with a Dragon or were there other systems?

 

EDIT Ah Ha - this list on Wikipedia is very illuminating (especially if you use the sort arrow on "Processors" to group machines of the same CPU). So was it "TRS-80 Color" computers that everyone was finding 6809's in?

 

EDIT2: I'm now reminded of OS/9:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OS-9 which then went on to be a multi-platform OS from humble beginnings on 6809. I remember flying to US once to visit Microware in Iowa - it sticks in the mind as it was near the bridges of Madison County. We had hoped to use their OS as the kernel in our satellite TV systems but that was later over-ruled by Sky TV anyway. I still have an OS9 mug somewhere. In fact what also sticks in the mind was blagging the goodies from them. Our technical director and I went away from there with bags full of stuff including a really nice branded jacket (about 3 shirt sizes ago!)

Last Edited: Tue. Jul 23, 2019 - 04:19 PM
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I never used a 6809.   But it certainly looked very attractive.

 

I don't think that the 6809 went into any mass market hobby computers.

 

David.

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Yep, I did my 6809 stuff on a TRS-80 Color Computer.  Kind of a funky machine, built to cost as little as possible.  I actually designed a box to plug into it that had a floppy controller, memory, and a Z-80 so I could run CP/M or Flex9.

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MattRW wrote:

2904 bit-slice for the win

 

2901's.  Still used in a production board...  (40-pin DIP, too!)  S.

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clawson wrote:
But for 6809 the only one I can actually remember was the Dragon.

I don't remember the Dragon, but in the US there was the Radio Shack (didn't they OWN the micro market at one time, yes they did) Coco, SWTPC and other SS-50 bus machines, Heathkit, Altair 680( I think there was an 09 upgrade), and some single board systems as well, but can't remember any details.

There were some others but memory is fading......

 

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clawson wrote:

Also had Tangerine Microtan 65...

 

Snap. Bought as a kit and hand delivered as the director used to pass my house on the home to and from work. Then a Nascom 2, which got heavily expanded to run CP/M and which morphed into a full Gemini system.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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clawson wrote:
So was it "TRS-80 Color" computers that everyone was finding 6809's in?
Guilty

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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