what is the name of the larger vs smaller dip 28?

Go To Last Post
22 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0


I pretty much need to find a board to go from a ATMEGA328  to the wide dip28. Just not sure of the right name to search for what I need. Here is a picture of the board I need.

This topic has a solution.
Last Edited: Thu. Jun 11, 2020 - 03:45 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dual_in-line_package

 

Commonly found DIP packages that conform to JEDEC standards use an inter-lead spacing (lead pitch) of 0.1 inches (2.54 mm) (JEDEC MS-001BA). Row spacing varies depending on lead counts, with 0.3 in. (7.62 mm) (JEDEC MS-001) or 0.6 inch (15.24 mm) (JEDEC MS-011) the most common.

 

I'm sure you could hack something together with vero/strip board and some pin headers. Do you need a commercial product ? 

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Aries-IC-Socket-Adapter-28pin-Adapts-0-3-W-DIP-to-0-6-W-Socket-Qty-48-/264198568490. Yours for $110 (for 48 off) surprise

 

Edited: here's the manufacturer's product page: https://www.arieselec.com/products/data/12030-row-to-row-dip-adapter-socket.htm. $7 each.

 

They have an amazing selection of things I never knew I needed !

 

In stock at Digikey (US) https://www.digikey.co.uk/products/en/connectors-interconnects/sockets-for-ics-transistors-adapters/411?k=1106396&k=&pkeyword=1106396&sv=0&pv10=i28&sf=0&quantity=&ColumnSort=0&page=1&pageSize=25 for around $10

 

 

Last Edited: Tue. Jun 9, 2020 - 10:56 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I tried a few things today but none of them really worked out. I'm trying to get it to go in to a stk500, and when I finally got one working the pins didnt even fit in the socket. So I'm biting the bullet.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

The larger, wide packages like the RAM or EEPROM chips? Plastic 0.6"?? I would go with veroboard too for the adaptor.

 

Also you could use single row socket and space as necessary.

 

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

the pins didnt even fit in the socket.

Yeah, the normal square pins won't fit in most IC sockets.  if you need to do that, you should find some pins with narrow round pins, or flat.

Something like this "round pin header": https://www.amazon.com/Simpo-Opt...

 

This reply has been marked as the solution. 
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

WARNING-- after I posted this, i saw the mention of square header pins not fitting all sockets...so take a look before leaping

 

whutz rong wiff: 

 

http://www.proto-advantage.com/store/images/PRODUCTS/DIP600T300P28_0.JPGv     cheap (sorta)!!!

 

it use smt pins, which can get pulled off, but "ok"

 

 

For pin tear strength, I prefer all through hole...they sell these boards empty,(so you can add your own sockets & headers)...actually, they charge $2 to solder the provided pins in.

   ...it comes with the headers, which you can instead install in the center, then add a wide socket

http://www.proto-advantage.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=3300013

 

 

These pins are somewhat flat

https://www.ebay.com/itm/20Pcs-40pin-2-54mm-Single-Row-Straight-Female-Pin-Header-Strip-PBC-Arduino-TOP/282638559541?hash=item41ce922935:g:lVYAAOSweW5VRLSs

 

even flatter, but more extraction/fussing   https://www.ebay.com/itm/5Pcs-2-54mm-Pitch-2x17-Pin-34-Pin-Female-Double-Row-DIP-Side-Entry-Header-Strip/172273012434?hash=item281c458ed2:g:r7oAAOSwySVZ9Y62

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Wed. Jun 10, 2020 - 01:20 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Or there's flip-pins

 

http://oshchip.org/products/Flip...

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

S_K_U_N_X wrote:

I tried a few things today but none of them really worked out. I'm trying to get it to go in to a stk500, and when I finally got one working the pins didnt even fit in the socket. So I'm biting the bullet.

What we did here for the std square header pins to DIP, was to use a sacrificial dual wipe socket, as an adapter.

The square pins can be encouraged to go into a dual wipe, but deform slightly, so it cannot be used for another purpose.

The very narrow pins out the bottom, then plug into your DIP socket.

If you lose a pin, just replace the DIP socket :)

 

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

That is exactly what I used to do... a sacrificial DIP socket that could be wrecked by plugging in square pins.

 

Jim

 

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

The pins show on Bill's post in #5 are round and thinner on the plug in part.

I have lots of them here as I used them for something at some time (the forgettery is working fine sad), I'm pretty sure I got them directly from MillMax years ago.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

How many do you need to make ?

 

I would bend the pins out, and tips down so they fit a "normal" 28 pin dip socket, and then solder the tips to the socket.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

I pretty much need to find a board to go from a ATMEGA328  to the wide dip28.

   tried a few things today but none of them really worked out.  I'm trying to get it to go in to a stk500  

Rereading everything, your question makes almost no sense...

........you say you want to widen things up, to plug into the stk500.  However if you are using the '328, you need a narrow socket on the stk500.  And why do you need a dip adapter at all to use the stk500 with a '328?

 

What exactly are you trying to do?

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Wed. Jun 10, 2020 - 06:25 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I expect that it's the other way around, OP has a 328 that he can put in a stk500, and then wire the IO's over to the wide socket, and get a prototype to work.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

OP has a 328 that he can put in a stk500, and then wire the IO's over to the wide socket,

 

well, I'd think so, but it doesn't match what is stated:

none of them really worked out.  I'm trying to get it to go in to a stk500, and when I finally got one working the pins didnt even fit 

So the description of the situation is not consistent 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Wed. Jun 10, 2020 - 06:24 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

 

I have the TQPF, I use an adapter that goes to the wider dip28.  It's a nice little clamshell that does the job.  Over time the wide to shorter adapter board pis broke off. So I tried to make my own, and found out the square pins do not work.  So I was just going to get a new adapter but could not find it.  Some of the links above look good I and bought a few.

 

Here is the adapter I have.

bottom has 28 pins wider then the dip socket.

 

My original question was clear enough
"I pretty much need to find a board to go from a ATMEGA328  to the wide dip28. Just not sure of the right name to search for what I need. "
and the replies answered it.

 

Last Edited: Wed. Jun 10, 2020 - 06:29 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I pretty much need to find a board to go from a ATMEGA328  to the wide dip28.

Why not mention that you are using TQFP?...instead of only showing an an adapter that converts from between dip narrow (as in '328) to dip wide.

Leading to great suggestions that fit your description, but are thrown aside:

  I would bend the pins out, and tips down so they fit a "normal" 28 pin dip socket, and then solder the tips to the socket.

 

You actually go from TQFP to dip wide to the narrow dip  ...hopefully some of the thin pins will work, or you can solder to a sacrificial socket that will fit. 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

Surely you buy a DIP28 ATmega328P and plug it into your STK500.   Connect any external electronics to the headers on the STK500.     That is what they are there for !!

 

Do all your development and testing on the STK500.

 

Then solder the TQFP32 to your actual target pcb.   Program the TQFP via the 3x2 ISP header (that you should have fitted to your pcb)

 

Personally,   I would forget about the STK500.   Buy a Uno clone board.   Mount any external electronics on a Protoshield.    Plug the Protoshield into the Uno.    Do all your development.

 

Alternatively,  buy an XMINI-328P.   Solder Arduino headers.   Plug the Protoshield into the XMINI.   One USB cable gives power, Serial and debugWIRE.

 

David.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

This is not for development its for repair.  I have a few boards coming back were some users had damaged it, and I can recycle the chips for refurbished units.  The board has no programming headers purposely. Taking a chip off is nothing, I can then re-flash them, and solder to a referb board or other various situations. I have a few resellers that even want to buy pre flashed chips. The only reason I use the stk500 is for high voltage programming because my chips use PC6. I should make my own some day I guess.

Last Edited: Wed. Jun 10, 2020 - 08:24 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

So you only use DIP28 chips !!

 

In which case you should still buy a DIP28.

 

If you actually use TQFP-32 in your product,  it would be much easier to buy a clamshell and mount it on a piece of Protoboard with the appropriate HVPP headers.

 

But even wiser to avoid RSTDISBL in the first place.

And I would never use damaged chips in a "refurbished unit"

 

David.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

No, all of my boards use TQFP. That is why I bought the clamshell  and use it to flash via the STK500 in HV programing mode. They are not damaged chips, they are damaged boards. I just take the good parts off. The reset disable has proven very helpful in preventing anyone from reading the chips. I was going to lock them but it is much easier to just disable the reset and I needed pc6 explicitly.

Last Edited: Thu. Jun 11, 2020 - 02:27 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

You use open source code so you most likely have to publish your code. why disable the reset pin then?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

The reset disable has proven very helpful in preventing anyone from reading the chips

Do you think anyone has?  If so, so what?   I think about that too, but haven't seemed to suffer any ill effect.

I bet instead someone will wait in the bushes to grab my chips then jump into a waiting car.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!