What kind of sex do you prefer?

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Yup, thought that thread title might make you read this!
.
So when you are using Arduino and other modules with breadboards do you prefer to use female connectors then male patch leads with pins? Or male connectors then patch leads with female sockets on the end.
.
I can swing either way(!) but I wonder if one is considered "better" than the other?

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The Arduino boards have female headers expecting male jumpers, as you know. All of my own designs are the other way around.

 

My feeling is that if a female header connector wears out, or you snap off a pin inside it, then it's probably game over. Male headers rarely break or wear out, and female jumpers can be easily discarded and replaced.

 

Your breadboard reference implies frequent plugging and unplugging.

 

(No deliberate euphemisms. Probably failed).

 

Last Edited: Thu. Sep 17, 2020 - 06:29 PM
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I prefer to use the female connectors on the board, that way I can use male/male jumpers, as I can plug them into other boards or into the BB itself without having to use the bisexual (male/female) jumpers!  

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

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Tri! Try anything... ;)

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obdevel wrote:
The Arduino boards have female headers expecting male jumpers, as you know.
Well here's the thing - the Teensy 4.0 I got was pinless - a deliberate choice as I wanted to be stackable.

 

But anyway I think my initial choice is made because I got this kind of stackable headers:

 

https://coolcomponents.co.uk/pro...

 

and I bit the bullet and soldered them so I guess I'm committed...

 

 

That's actually a Teensy with an Audio board on top.

 

(the only thing is I have far more female-female connector leads than I have male-male). 

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When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Anderson Power Pole connectors and in the same flavor, GR UHF/microwave coax connectors

 

West Coast Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

Last Edited: Thu. Sep 17, 2020 - 08:57 PM
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clawson wrote:
and I bit the bullet and soldered them so I guess I'm committed..

 

To what facility, are visitors permitted, and do you get to go out on a day pass?

 

Right Side Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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Personally,  I have lots of female-female Dupont jumper cables (like STK500)

Most ready made modules have male headers.   Duponts are pretty reliable with proper male headers.

 

Arduinos have female header sockets.   I hand-wire ProtoShields to suit external electronics.  

I have a collection of header strips.  Male, Female, Straight, Long, Angled, ..., Stackable

 

Breadboards are massed female.

A quick lash-up with Chinese cheapo male-male jumpers

Better with solid wire jumpers for breadboard routeing.

And flexible wire Duponts for external wiires.

 

You can convert a female socket into male with a length of male header.

e.g. angle header into Arduino sockets gives external male.

 

 

I am used to the Arduino Shield layout.   It can't be plugged round the wrong way.

Your photo shows stackable boards.   Be careful to mark pin #1

 

David.

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Obviously if you're stacking boards you have to have both - one board of each type - but for me if it's cables, it's always male on the board, female on the cable.  Look at any ribbon cable*...  S.

 

* Yeah yeah, with a few bizarre exceptions.  How many kazillion hard drives can't be wrong?

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I prefer male headers on boards and female-female jumpers simply because you can disconnect one end and not have to worry about shorting against something unintentionally.

Letting the smoke out since 1978

 

 

 

 

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Another reason for preferring male pins on boards:

 

Male board header:  $0.40

Female ribbon cable receptacle : $0.52

Total connector cost:  $0.92

 

Female Board Receptacle:  $1.39

Male ribbon cable header: $3.13

Total connector cost:  $4.52

 

All prices USD, from Digikey, cheapest listed @ Quan. 1, for 0.050" spac. 26-pin ribbon cable, IDC crimp for the cable, thru-hole for the board;

P/Ns linked as follows:

 

https://www.digikey.com/product-...

https://www.digikey.com/product-...

 

https://www.digikey.com/product-...

https://www.digikey.com/product-...

 

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EZ-hooks... but they are a little dangerous.

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When using a breadboard I find that "telephone" wire works well, inserts into the breadboard easily, and with a good quality breadboard it gives a good connection. 

 

I have a number of inexpensive pre-fabbed M to M connector wires, (Dupont wires?).

They are very convenient, BUT sometimes they are difficult to insert into the breadboard.

I think the connector is pinched when it is cut, and the tip is splayed out, widening it a little bit, making it hard to insert into the breadboard.

 

I use male connectors on the PCB for programming as all of my ISP / PDI / UPDI programmers have female cables.

 

Additionally, as DigitalDan mentioned, one is less likely to accidentally short the wire to something else, or short out two traces/pins/components etc when placing a female connector on a PCB.

 

JC

 

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DocJC wrote:
When using a breadboard I find that "telephone" wire works well, ...
AtomicZombie states use of Ethernet cable.

DocJC wrote:
... making it hard to insert into the breadboard.
BusBoard ZipWire™ should be a better fit.

 


Radical Brad Hacks – Vulcan-74 Page 1 | AtomicZombie DIY Plans

[3/4 page]

... roll your own wiring using CAT-5 wire as shown here. 

Wiring | BusBoard Prototype Systems

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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If I had not seen this thread was posted by Clawsen I would not have opened it. An informative thread.

--
"Why am I so soft in the middle when the rest of my life is so hard?"
-Paul Simon

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i believe that you should ALWAYS use female in the device that sourcing power, just like wall plug.

Using FEMALE in source power device, in your case the arduino itself, while shield boards sink current and male pins may preferred.

 

the idea is simple naked pins can easily shortcut by accident and problems occurs

Last Edited: Sun. Sep 20, 2020 - 03:49 PM
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I have no strong views on gender, but I do find thst a lot of the stackable connectors that are supplied with "arduino " products seem to have an aversion to solder.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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In the end I just used a load if male-male wires (even though I actually have far more female-female) but try as I might I cannot get an ILI9341 based 2.8" 320x240 LCD to show anything whether I wire it to a 3.3V Tennsy 4.0 or a 5V standard Uno. Mst frustrating but I just had 2 more delivered that are a different version of the PCB so I am hopeful for those.

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I've found the Teensy 4.1 is a far more useable board - more i/o, more flash, usb host and ethernet.  Another high performance and cheap board is the maix-bit. You can get it with a camera and tft display.

Here's some emulations that might be of interest:

https://github.com/Jean-MarcHarv...

 

 

 

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Yeah I am kicking myself now for getting 4.0 not 4.1 so I'm going to end up using an Uno simply as little more than a "port expander" (not withstanding the 3.3V / 5V mismatch).

 

I've got a box of goodies that Atmel once sent me and I think there's a 1284 Xplained in there somewhere so if I need even more pins I may switch to that as an "expander" instead.

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One advantage of female connectors on the boards is that you can easily implement female-to-male "gender changers" with a cheap header pin.  Female-to-female adapters are harder (except for the ubiquitous "dupont cables")

 

One disadvantage of the female board connectors is that a lot of them are pretty crappy things with a two-sided fork and tiny contact area, rather than the 4-sided cage you see on most cable connectors.  :-(   It's pretty convenient to be able to plug in random wires, but I'll bet the connectors won't last long...

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@Cliff,

 

Please post a link to the actual ILI9341 displays that you have bought.

 

I have a Teensy 4.0 and have probably run most "TFT" things on Arduinos.

If you have not soldered headers on yet,  think about mounting a microSD card holder.

 

David.

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I use female connectors on board which is power source for the second one. It's a simple way to reduce damages from shortages of the supply pins when the boards are disconnected.

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david.prentice wrote:
Please post a link to the actual ILI9341 displays that you have bought.
David,

 

It was this one:

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/prod...

 

(and yes I paid a silly price simply to avoid the Chinese delivery delay!). But this board appears to be a later version than most (many advertised on ebay/banngood/aliexpress are marked V1.1 or V1.2) in that it has this:

 

 

So unlike previous ones it appears to offer dual voltage (well for Vcc anyway - though I think the signals are 3.3V). So I have tried it both with the J1 made and 3.3V (teensy) and without and 5V (Uno) but in the classic "graphictest" it seems like there's no SPI response as all the values are 0x00.

 

It was only after I got it that I realised that not only was it (comparatively) expensive but as you can see it's one of these cheapskate ones without the touch controller. So I also ordered:

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/240-3...

 

which is both half the price (so I bought two ;-) and also has the touch controller and the pen. These ones are most definitely the original "V1.1":

 

 

and I know these ones have been shown to work fine with Teensy 4.0. I thought I was going to wait weeks for these (ordered 12th Sept) but the postman just delivered a package this morning (so less than 10 days) and I'll be able to try them out tonight.

 

Assuming these ones work I will likely just write off the expensive Amazon one as a "bad loss". I would just send it to you (as I know from your arduino.cc posts that you are a bit of an expert on these things) but I daren't go near a post office :-(

 

(one downside of a 600MHz Teensy with a 60MHz SPI is that you need a pretty fancy scope to see what may be/not be occurring and I simply don't have that!)

 

Last Edited: Mon. Sep 21, 2020 - 11:14 AM
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clawson wrote:
(one downside of a 600MHz Teensy with a 60MHz SPI is that you need a pretty fancy scope to see what may be/not be occurring and I simply don't have that!)

 

The other downside is that you can get signal integrity issues using bits 'o' wire to hook things up. separate the wires if you are using the rainbow 'dupont' thingys and/or run slower spi clock rate.

 

In my teensy applicatiion, I'm bit-bashing a bus interface to an old 8 bit computer. Interrupt rate is over 1MHz! Just working on the cp/m emulation at the moment and have just soldered on a 8MB serial ram chip.

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or add some series resistance (series termination, improve the impedance match)

 

Assuming the rise/fall/setup/hold times are correct, operate a logic analyzer.

Using the SPI Analyzer - Saleae Support

Protocol decoder:spi - sigrok

Analyzer2Go - Turn your development board into a logic analyzer

CYUSB3KIT-003 EZ-USB® FX3™ SuperSpeed Explorer Kit (Cypress Semiconductor)

 

edit :

High Speed Logic Probes - Digilent

Using the Protocol Analyzer [Digilent Documentation]

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Mon. Sep 21, 2020 - 12:08 PM
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Turns out the delivered ones are actually the "V1.2" variant in fact. Guess I'll see if they work later.

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Cliff,

 

They are regular "Chinese Red SPI displays".   Just connect

VCC   5V

GND   GND

CS     any GPIO

RESET any GPIO

D/C    any GPIO

SDI    MOSI

SCK   SCK

LED   5V with 39R series resistor.

SDO  MISO

 

If you want to use VCC = 3.3V you short the J1 jumper.   And can omit the series resistor on LED line.

 

Paul Stoffregen has ILI9341 libraries and examples.   I suggest that you follow his wiring (and constructor)

 

However,  many other ILI9341 libraries will work.  e.g. Adafruit_ILI9341.

 

Beware of Adafruit examples.   They tend to use a cut-down constructor that omits the RST argument.   Or persuades you to use -1.

Adafruit displays have a pullup on RST line.

Chinese displays do not have the pullup resistor.

 

This guarantees that punters will think their Chinese display is faulty.   (and buy from Adafruit)

 

Connect the RST line to a GPIO pin.   Always use the full-fat constructor.   Start with the bit-bang version.

 

Note that some of the v1 boards have a transistor on the LED line.   So you can switch back light on or off via a GPIO pin.

And some pcbs are old with the XPT2046 unmounted.  e.g. your photo.

The "unmounted" versions probably have no Touch Panel.   So there is no point in soldering a Touch Controller chip.

 

David.

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david.prentice wrote:

They tend to use a cut-down constructor that omits the RST argument.   Or persuades you to use -1.

Adafruit displays have a pullup on RST line.

Chinese displays do not have the pullup resistor.

Ah ha. While in earlier experiments I was using an IO for RST the fact is that later on I was just using 255 (and passing nothing to the c'tor) so I guess that might be the issue.

 

Will revert to wiring that one up too.

david.prentice wrote:
Always use the full-fat constructor.
As you'll know the "full fat" c'tor actually includes the SPI signals too. I guess one can just let those default?
david.prentice wrote:
The "unmounted" versions probably have no Touch Panel.   So there is no point in soldering a Touch Controller chip.
Indeed this is true. I have an idea for how I would use the touch/pen but on the other hand I know from experience that ITO overlays can blur/dull the image so it's a bit of a trade-off.

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I've 'auditioned' most of the common ILI9341 libraries, as getting reasonable performance from an 8-bit 16MHz MCU over SPI can be a challenge. You probably won't have the same issue with a nice, fast Teensy.

 

I find the Adafruit libraries have become very bloated over time, as they add more and more generic abstraction layers.

 

My preferred one is https://github.com/Bodmer/TFT_IL..., but it's very AVR-specific. It also has a strange approach to assigning the pin numbers and which fonts are included, by editing one of the library's .h files. All well and good until (a) an update overwrites it, and/or (b) you have multiple concurrent projects that need different settings.

 

I tend to use a 74LVC245 as a uni-directional level shifter. Cheap and still available in a DIP package.

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clawson wrote:
As you'll know the "full fat" c'tor actually includes the SPI signals too. I guess one can just let those default?

 

If the constructor includes SCK, MOSI arguments it is bit-bang.    All arguments are treated as GPIO.

If not included it is HW SPI

 

I suggest that you start with the SCK, MOSI, .... version constructor

If you have selected the HW SCK, MOSI pins you can change to the HW constructor.

 

David.

Last Edited: Mon. Sep 21, 2020 - 02:20 PM
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Well that was easy - I just wired up one of the newly delivered displays and instantly..

 

 

that is (sadly a bit out of focus):

 

 

and my original synth code, using the I2S Audio Adapter, all still works at the same time. Woo hoo!

 

When I plug the original TFT delivery in place of this one it's just a white screen so I guess that's the best part of 2 wasted days I'm never getting back !!

 

Oh and now I have the potential of "touch" too - so I should be able to draw ADSR shapes using the pen - which is nice ;-)

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clawson wrote:

...

Oh and now I have the potential of "touch" too - so I should be able to draw ADSR shapes using the pen - which is nice ;-)

 

Like this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fa... ?

 

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I would expect your original display to work fine.   Unless you have done something criminal to it.   e.g. closing J1 for VCC=3.3V and then connecting to 5V without opening J1.

 

Hey-ho.   Those displays work nicely.    And can operate at considerable speed i.e. SCK @ 27MHz safely.   SCK @ 42MHz with care.

Which is as fast as humans should be happy with.    (and much faster than the datasheet says)

 

David.

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Actually I think it defaults to SPI.setClock(60000000) so is running it at 60MHz which seems to work so far..

 

 

Never used this graphics lib before - it's very easy to use - I like nice touches like rounded rectangles etc.

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Never used this graphics lib before 

Which this?  Please, do say...much better than old block-style sprites.  

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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avrcandies wrote:
Which this?  Please, do say...much better than old block-style sprites.  
It's ILI9341_t3 from Paul at PJRC specifically for Teensy but it's really just an optimisation of the faithful old Adafruit_GFX that everyone in Arduino-land probably uses for GLCD anyway. (yeah I know about UTFT, UG8 etc but I think Adafruit will just win by sheer wait of numbers)

Last Edited: Thu. Sep 24, 2020 - 08:13 AM