What development jigs do you use?

Go To Last Post
21 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I suspect that many of you have developed small items to help repeated developments using Atmel chips (and others). If they have been useful to you, maybe they could be useful to others also.

I am willing to kick the list off with one of mine.

I have done several designs using the V-USB minimal interface ( http://www.obdev.at/products/vus... ) using software and a small number of external components. These have been done on the Mega8, Tiny2313, Tiny85 and Mega88 chips. To avoid the repeated exercise of doing a prototype for each processor I made a single pcb assembly that includes the USB connector for testing after code downloading, optional diode droppers from 5 volts to 3.3 volts, optional 3V6 zener diodes on the D+ & D- lines, a reset button, ISP interface to my dragon (or STK500) whose pins are then available for patching to the specific development chip, and a couple of crystals (12MHz and 16 MHz) with their load capacitors. This little board plugs into a breadboard and provides the ground and power rails while also providing the mechanical support for the pcb.

Any other contributions?

Cheers,

Ross

Attachment(s): 

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Here is mine that I used when I was playing with AVR8s.
Designed for prototyping and debugging (not for release).
On the back side there is a 32kiB of SRAM + latch, 5V6 zener on supply (just in case), LED, reset button, unpopulated place for watch crystal, some passives etc.
Two cylindrical connectors protruding on the side are for various quartz crystals.
The package is 2xPDIP20 with ISP+USART0 on one end and JTAG+USART1 on the other. It has about 35IOs overall.

It was designed to be used on a breadboard of course.

And here is the rest of the development hardware.
wigh3

Attachment(s): 

No RSTDISBL, no fun!

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Both are adapters for in-circuit ISP programming:

Left side: Adapter for Tiny45-85 and similar.
Connects a TINY85 either to ISP or to board using 3 relays.

Right side: ISP adapter for TINY2313 or similar.
Fits between TINY2313 and socket and adapts ISP
10 pin connector. I have this type for all types
of AVR I use.

Attachment(s): 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Arduino shield for ISP/HVSP/Debugging of 8-pin AVR.

Dickson charge pump driven by PWM feeds a 78L12 for HVSP.

All target pins accessible as input/output.

HVSP currently only used to reset fuses.

Serial debugging.

Attachment(s): 

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

joeymorin wrote:

Dickson charge pump driven by PWM feeds a 78L12 for HVSP.

Do you use mosfets or diodes?

I have no special talents.  I am only passionately curious. - Albert Einstein

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ralphd wrote:
mosfets or diodes?
Diodes.

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

joeymorin wrote:
ralphd wrote:
mosfets or diodes?
Diodes.

Did you really need the 78L12, or did you just put it in for good measure?

I just tested a single-stage charge pump with a t85. I used 2x .1uF caps and 2 schottky diodes. With no load and a 5.0V supply I get 10.06V. With a 100kOhm load I get 9.69V. Switching one of the schottky's for a 1n4148 gives 9.27V.
By extrapolation, a 2-stage charge pump with 4 1n4148's should give about 12.5V. Loading with a LED and 10K series resistor as a HSVP active indicator, the voltage should be pretty close to 12.0V.

Edit: the charge pump frequency I used was 2.5Mhz. I tried 150Khz and 40Mhz as well, and found I got the highest voltages at 2.5Mhz.

I have no special talents.  I am only passionately curious. - Albert Einstein

 

Last Edited: Mon. Apr 7, 2014 - 06:31 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Last year I made a parallel port programmer adapter from a wire wrap socket:
http://nerdralph.blogspot.ca/201...

It was a bit inconvenient moving the MCU from the socket to breadboard, and wouldn't work with larger (>14-pin) chips or the pro minis I like to use.

So after getting a USBasp, I made a programming adapter cable to use with a breadboard:
http://nerdralph.blogspot.ca/201...

I have no special talents.  I am only passionately curious. - Albert Einstein

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

For v-usb work, I made a jig from a broken iPhone charging cable and some protoboard.
It it is meant to line up with the pins of a t85 in a breadboard as follows:
Vbus -> pin1
D- -> pin2
D+ -> pin3
Gnd -> pin4

It has a 0805 7.5K resistor between Vbus and D- for pullup. I put a red LED between pin 1 and pin 8 to drop Vcc to ~3.3V.

For the next one I make I plan to put the red led on the protoboard, as well as a 0.1uF 0805 cap so I don't need one on the breadboard.

Attachment(s): 

I have no special talents.  I am only passionately curious. - Albert Einstein

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Ralph,

Quote:
It it is meant to line up with the pins of a t85 in a breadboard as follows:
Vbus -> pin1
D- -> pin2
D+ -> pin3
Gnd -> pin4

Just checking... on a Tiny85, VBus (or Vcc) is pin 8, not your "pin1" which is /reset.

Cheers,

Ross

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

valusoft wrote:
Ralph,

Quote:
It it is meant to line up with the pins of a t85 in a breadboard as follows:
Vbus -> pin1
D- -> pin2
D+ -> pin3
Gnd -> pin4

Just checking... on a Tiny85, VBus (or Vcc) is pin 8, not your "pin1" which is /reset.

Cheers,

Ross

Perhaps you skipped over:

Quote:

I put a red LED between pin 1 and pin 8 to drop Vcc to ~3.3V.

I have no special talents.  I am only passionately curious. - Albert Einstein

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

That's me... forever skipping.

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Here is mine. It is the start of a universal development system. Think AVR, PIC, MSP430, anything with up to 64 IO pins.

The setup in the picture has a buffered LED board on top, than can be connected to any port. Below that is a DIP switch board, also connectable to any port. Below that is a 28 pin AVR MCU board and, at the bottom, a power supply board that supports 5V, 3.3V, 2.7V, 2.2V, and 1.8V systems.

There is an LCD board, an Arduino Shield Adaptor board, a General Purpose IO board, and several others, not shown.

Just swap out the MCU board, and everything else fits. Rotate each board to align with the desired port, then plug together.

Not quite ready to sell. This is the first time it has been revealed to the world.

Jim

Attachment(s): 

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ralphd wrote:
Did you really need the 78L12, or did you just put it in for good measure?
I initially tested without the regulator and with a 3-stage multiplier using 100 nF (and 1N5711?). I cracked one of the glass schottkys and switched to 1N5819s because that's what I had on hand.

Without the regulator I was using the analog comparator to monitor the output voltage and software to cycle the pump on and off to maintain a regulated output voltage under various loads. The output was pretty smooth but I tried the regulator to see how I could improve matters. Output was much smoother and I no longer needed to cycle the pump in software to regulate the output, although I still used the comparator (or the ADC in some versions) to monitor for low-voltage conditions.

I ran some tests under various loads and found that a pump frequency of about 300 kHz provided peak power under heavy loads while maintaining the regulated output. Peak programming current under HVSP is 0.25 mA. My current setup can deliver 5 mA at a regulated 12 V, so this is all serious overkill. However, the project began as a test bed for other charge pump applications, and was only later shoe-horned into it's current role as an occasional ISP/HVSP development jig. Certainly the next one I build (if ever) will likely use something closer to my original setup.

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Interesting idea Jim. Thanks for sharing. Hope it sells well for you.

Cheers,

Ross

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ka7ehk wrote:
Here is mine. It is the start of a universal development system.

Cool. How do you keep track of which pins line up in the stack? i.e. if you have an 32-pin AVR 2 boards down, how do you know which pin on the top are the SPI pins?
Is there dedicated pins for 5v, 3.3v and GND, or is that also dependant on how you spin the boards?

I have no special talents.  I am only passionately curious. - Albert Einstein

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

It is totally dependent on the MCU and the orientation of the stacked boards. I am working on software, right now, to help manage that, but it really is not so bad, without it.

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I have found being portable helps my development work. I do not work always work the exact hardware. My ECU hardware requires, a simulator that includes an AVR for timing signal generation, LEDs, pots for analog, hand vacuum pump, and power supply. All that stuff is not well boxed or portable.

I plan to use an Arduino Nano for communications development. It is USB powered. I can easily copy paste the ECU communications code, and run on the Nano. I also use a Saleae Logic8 LA, it is portable and works well to verify timing routines. I find it more useful than a scope for that. I have also shown my favorite Pololu programmer, it also serves as a rx, tx COM port or slow analog scope. The small SparkFun board is a 6 pin ISP to 10 pin adapter. I carry my toys in a zip pouch with my computer. I can develop many things, anywhere.

Attachment(s): 

It all starts with a mental vision.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

So Kit is the only one here that's been delivered of DIP pins?

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Back when I kept a messy room, a few dead legs up, DIP parts were stepped on. They are hard to pry of a heel, SMT are more comfortable to walk on :).

It all starts with a mental vision.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

And I no longer have rows of little holes in my fingertips.

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut.