What are _you_ using avr's for?

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#1
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Just very curious to know what people are using their mcu's for! And which device's you're using as well.

I use them for home automation, catching strobes from the "kWh led flash", driving strings of led in the front and back of the house, using pwm etc.

They are (or actually, will be, it's not completely ready yet) driven using i2c (twi), so I can add easily add various sensors that also work with i2c.

That means attiny's will just do for me.

Last Edited: Thu. Aug 2, 2012 - 02:58 PM
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I've got two current AVR projects going. One is small modules of various configurations driving 6 RGB LEDs (software PWM). Another is a small micro "brick" (3x5cm) with some analog and digital I/O and built-in RS-485.

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What types of avr's are you using?

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eriksl wrote:
What types of avr's are you using?

ATMega48s in both cases, though the RS-485 brick could take a larger chip (up to M328) if necessary.

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Thanks.

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I've used AVR for all kinds of stuff, some things that come to mind right now:

GPS logger
Nikon DSLR intervalometer
RGB LED color wheel
Collision light controller for a Lego airplane
Dual input window watchdog
Central locking controller for my car
Speed sensitive power steering controller
Programmable intermittent wiper relay
Product flash and test system
Car fuel computer
DCF77 clock

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Nice :-)

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I used a ATtiny2123 to build a replacement for my garage door opener's hardwired keypad controller. All the commercial replacements I found are wireless and cost just as much as replacing the whole unit :roll:

One of my "round tuit" projects is to build a one-wire interface so I can monitor a handful of ds18b20's. Probably stick that on a ATtiny85.

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My most comprehensive project yet is a RGB propeller display using an Atmega644 (and TLC59116).

I have previously made a battery discharger using an Atmega8 some years ago. I have also made a temperature logger using an Atmega8 too, about the same time several years ago.

I have plans to make an "alarm clock" with a 10W LED instead of a speaker using an Atmega48.

And then I have used micros from Cypress and Texas in the last 2 years because that was what we were using at the school! ;)

- Brian

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Mostly stage effects. I've built a batch of boards to control discrete LEDs, and some novelty-oversized color-changing light bulbs, retrofitted a laser projector for DMX control, made a DMX servo controller, built a small remote-controlled winch to fly a small puppet in from the ceiling, a DMX-controlled snow drum, and various small effects like a traffic light sequencer and a fake TV with 40W of high power LEDs flickered by an AVR. I typically use either Mega8 or Mega644P devices depending on how many I/Os and USARTs I need. Currently in the works is a 3x16 channel 5A 12-bit dimmer for some RGB LED tape in an upcoming project, which will also use a 644P.

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Too many projects to count...
Emergency vehicle tracking
Garage door encoded keypad
Isolated EKG
Sequential two-tone decoder
Poor man's VHF repeater controller
Xmega programmer
Plus some Bluetooth and XBee RF projects
Phone line call logger
Emergency vehicle power controller, (for light bar, etc.)
Car's speedometer and cruise control, (old projects)
Plus a few others...

JC

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I prefer small ATmega because they are easy going yet powerful.

One project is a scope tube clock with Snake and Asteroids.

There are also some "pure" software projects like Computing 4000 Digits of π with ATtiny2313 programmed in C99.

avrfreaks does not support Opera. Profile inactive.

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I mainly do "proof of concept" prototypes (sometimes with short production runs). AVR projects have included ...

- self serve coffee shot dispenser (Tiny2313)
- ESD strap monitor for Intel (Tiny2313)
- queuing ticket dispenser for Canadian Govt (Mega88)
- retro game interface (V-USB + Tiny85)
- kiosk intruder alarm (Mega32U4)
- capacitive touch PC navigation through shop window (Mega32U4)

Cheers,

Ross

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Using an ATMEGA328P to control a FM stereo broadcast receiver/amp (uses a TEA5767 for the FM receiver and a 16x1 LCD) and also as a controller for experimenting with AD9850 DDS modules from ebay.

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This is all very cool stuf guys! Thanks!

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I have wondered what people use them for and how they got started.

I work with power convertion (power electronics).
I have worked in the subject for a long time and
now applying microcontrollers to the subject.
Started a few years ago with atmega8 but moving over
to 88 and tiny45. Tiny45 because of the PLL.

John

If all else fails, read the instructions.

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Are referring to the pll that multiplies the system clock by eight to be used as i/o clock?

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Quote:
Are referring to the pll that multiplies the system clock by eight to be used as i/o clock?

Yes that is one way to put it.

One of the problems in applying microcontrollers to this type of work is that you need to start with such a high frequency in order to get the frequency out that you want with good resolution. You need to start with a frequency a thousand times the frequency that you want to get about as good as you could have got with analogue/logic gate type of approach.

But there is no need to drive the core fast.

John

If all else fails, read the instructions.

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Anything I think of!

Stead of a handful of parts, one Tiny2313 or Tiny45 can do a lot. Have bigger ideas than time or budget.

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

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Hehe, totally agree with that!

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Does taping a DIP Mega16 on the end of a yardstick and using it as a back scratcher count?

Chuck Baird

"I wish I were dumber so I could be more certain about my opinions. It looks fun." -- Scott Adams

http://www.cbaird.org

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Ow!

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

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Quote:

Does taping a DIP Mega16 on the end of a yardstick and using it as a back scratcher count?

Perhaps, but that's no big DIL...

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AVRs used over period 1998 - 2012.

Controlling analog servo by soft PWM (AT90S1200)
Noise and sound (beep) generation (ATmega8)
Controlling digital potentiometers DS1669, DS1802, AD5231 (ATtiny22L, ATtiny26)
Controlling 433MHz RX TX sets (ATtiny13)
Digital audio mixer chip SSM2163 (AT90S1200)
Controlling FM transmittter chip BH1414K (ATtiny44)
Controlling all kinds of LEDs (charlieplexing, multiplexing) (ATtiny11, ATtiny13)
Multiplexing dotmatrices, 7-segment and starburst displays (ATtiny2313)
Used as LCD 1x8, 2x16, 4x20, GLCD 128x64 and OLED 128x64 display controllers (AT90S1200, AT90S2313, ATtiny2313, ATmega8, ATmega88, ATmega328, ATmega1284P)
Hexapod robot controlling unit with motor driver and GLCD (ATmega8)
Creating a boost and buck converter (ATtiny15L, ATtiny45)
10-bit DDS phase accumulator (AT90PWM3, ATtiny861)
Controlling alphanumeric LED display + DAC (AT90PWM3)
LED moving message 7x32 sign RS232 (AT90S2313, ATmega8)
4 digit 7-segments LED clock with set and dimm (ATtiny26, ATtiny861)
Big RGB LED sign (ATtiny2313)
RS458 network (ATtiny2313, ATmega8)

And more of this kind of stuff and tests and prototypes. Here you can see a few of them http://www.youtube.com/user/Robs... and/or check the Academy.

RES

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Industrial Control/Automation, specifically controlling a pressure regulator with 'dumb' control (on/off).

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I use the AVR's for very simple things as more complex applications
(like Video generators) would be out of my ability...

If I would make something like that the code and circuit would not be my own.

I use AVR's because they are fun and affordable.

But I have created using the 2313 / 8515 (type of AVR's)

Model Rail-Road enhancement applications (Rail yard track and Crossing Signals)

Amature radio repeater controller (once-upon a time)

Digital clock.. using a "GPS module" for the RTC Time updating.

Servo and Stepper Motor Drivers (for experimentation) and to learn how.

And a few other Blinky LED things for fun.

They are great (best invention) for electronics hobby

"We look for things.. Things that make us go."