What are the AVR28DA128 AVR32DA128 AVR48DA128 AVR64DA128 ??

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Thu. Nov 5, 2020 - 04:08 AM
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DocJC wrote:
The two level priority interrupt is a step down from the 3 Level interrupt controller in the Xmegas, but is a big step up from a single level controller in the classic AVR Mega and Tiny micros.

Interrupts | Migration from the megaAVR® to AVR® Dx Microcontroller Families

[last paragraph]

Additionally to the CVT [Compact Vector Table] feature, the AVR Dx interrupt controller offers a non-maskable interrupt for critical functions, one selectable high-priority interrupt, and an optional round robin scheduling scheme for normal priority interrupts.

in Migration from the megaAVR® to AVR® Dx Microcontroller Families

or AN3731 - Migration from the megaAVR to AVR Dx Microcontroller Families (PDF)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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The compact vector table is a nice feature for small memory AVRs.

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The AVR DA datasheet says that VDD and AVDD are internally connected.  What's the point of L200 on AVDD on the AVR128DA48 CURIOSITY NANO if they are not going to do the same on VDD?  Is this just cargo cult PCB design?  Or does it really serve a purpose?

 

Reference: http://ww1.microchip.com/downloa... , page 29 for schematic.

 

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Although internally connected, there may be some impedance between VDD and AVDD that is not stated.

Providing external isolation between the analog and digital domains may improve the noise on those circuits when using analog signals.

   (Or the inductor could just be a cut and paste from earlier designs...)

David

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Maybe the AVDD domain is diode connected to the VDD domain. Consider the MVIO domain on the DB series; it is new to me, so I am mostly clueless, but the AVDD domain would probably need some changes to work like that. I don't even know if ADCs can be done like the MVIO stuff, but who knows? If so, I am confident Microchip will get it to us, but as someone will point out, I should not hold my breath.

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I appreciate the guesses -- I can guess too -- but I need something a little more definitive.

 

Does anyone from Microchip ever provide definitive answers to questions like this here?  For all its flaws, I can actually count on STMicro to provide useful support on their community forum when needed.

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I was not under the impression that this was Microchip support? It is more like a group of cranky old people that occasionally talk about AVRs.

 

https://www.microchip.com/en-us/support

 

https://microchipsupport.force.com/s/support-resources?tabName=Community

Last Edited: Sun. Nov 15, 2020 - 04:30 AM
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If you want an answer from Microchip you need to open a support question on their website.

 

Moderator

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Mobilinkd wrote:
I can guess too

Good to know.

 

Mobilinkd wrote:

but I need something a little more definitive.

 

I measure 3.3 ohm resistance between VCC and AVCC in both directions with a multimeter on an AVR128DA28. This is the best I can do for you... this forum is made up mostly of users of AVRs, we didn't design them...

Last Edited: Sun. Nov 15, 2020 - 03:44 PM
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ron_sutherland wrote:

I was not under the impression that this was Microchip support? It is more like a group of cranky old people that occasionally talk about AVRs.

 

https://www.microchip.com/en-us/support

 

https://microchipsupport.force.com/s/support-resources?tabName=Community

 

Atmel (now Microchip) points people here for support.  This is how I ended up here looking for infomation on AVR DA parts.

 

https://community.atmel.com/

 

There is no support forums on Microchip's site dedicated to AVR chips.  It's still very much PIC-land.

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El Tangas wrote:

I measure 3.3 ohm resistance between VCC and AVCC in both directions with a multimeter on an AVR128DA28. This is the best I can do for you... this forum is made up mostly of users of AVRs, we didn't design them...

 

Thank you.  That's quite helpful.  And a bit disappointing for my use case.

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Also wanted to point out that someone else asked where to find the Microchip support forum for AVR chips and was directed here: https://www.microchip.com/forums...

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DocJC wrote:
... and having 3 internal Op-amps for Analog Front End Signal Conditioning is a great feature.
Integrated OPAMP(s) on PIC® and AVR® MCUs_ - YouTube (3 videos for 15m total)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Interesting.   I hadn't realized that the MVIO features would work with both VCCio > VCC AND VCCio < VCC, or that they had gone to such lengths to monitor and detect assorted separate VCCio failures...

 

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I am finalizing a board with a DB that will run at 5V and interface to an R-Pi at 3V3 with the MVIO port. A previous setup (324pb) let out some smoke when I did not do the power-up sequence correctly; this MVIO seemed like a natural solution and should allow any power sequence to be valid.

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With DB line the MVIO fuse may default be factory programed to enabled

 

https://github.com/SpenceKonde/DxCore/issues/45#issuecomment-742853995

 

That makes sense to me, but is it true?

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:

web pages for the future AVR DD :

AVR64DD32 - 8-bit Microcontrollers

AVR64DD28 - 8-bit Microcontrollers

 

 

Those look very nice. I wish they had USB though. Maybe I'm the only one doing USB on 8 bit any more...

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Revision History | Getting Started with Universal Synchronous and Asynchronous Receiver and Transmitter (USART)

...

C

01/2021

Updated the GitHub repository links. Added the AVR® DA Family Overview, References, and Revision History sections. Added MCC versions for each use case, running on AVR128DA48. Minor editorial corrections.

...

TB3216 Getting Started with USART

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:

Revision History | Getting Started with Universal Synchronous and Asynchronous Receiver and Transmitter (USART)

...

C

01/2021

Updated the GitHub repository links. Added the AVR® DA Family Overview, References, and Revision History sections. Added MCC versions for each use case, running on AVR128DA48. Minor editorial corrections.

...

TB3216 Getting Started with USART

 

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Do you see guys any reason Microchip went for Tiny0, Tiny1 series, them Mega0 (Mega1 doesn't get it it seems) and now DA, DB and DD?

I thought Mega0 was the final touch for the famous 8bit AVR... The best you can get it for a 64K address range for an 8bit micro (sort of).

At least they limit the Dx series to 128K flash, which is natural for the architecture.

In the era of small, cheap, low power 32bit micro's I don't know what is the reason of Dx. If you want simple peripherals (let's say the 8bitters have that), put them around a cortex-m0+... Just saying...

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rammon wrote:

In the era of small, cheap, low power 32bit micro's I don't know what is the reason of Dx. If you want simple peripherals (let's say the 8bitters have that), put them around a cortex-m0+... Just saying...

 

There is still a big market for 8 bit MCUs because they have some advantages. The 32 bit ones, mostly ARM, can't match them on power consumption in many applications. They can sometimes compliment more powerful MCUs as well, e.g. you might have an ARM that has variable interrupt latency so you throw in an 8 bit MCU to handle some particular task.

 

They just work, they are solid and well understood, and you don't have to rely on buggy libraries. AVR assembler is much nicer than ARM too. I still prefer 8 bit where possible.

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rammon wrote:
Do you see guys any reason Microchip went for Tiny0, Tiny1 series, them Mega0 ...

  • improved AVR CPU architecture
  • increased data memory
  • more peripherals
  • wafer fab'd and assembled at Microchip

rammon wrote:
I thought Mega0 was the final touch for the famous 8bit AVR...
though USB megaAVR are long-in-tooth compared to USB PIC (megaAVR 1-series?)

rammon wrote:
In the era of small, cheap, low power 32bit micro's I don't know what is the reason of Dx.
Wide voltage is somewhat rare for 32b MCU (an exception is PIC32CM [motor control, CMOS noise immunity is proportional to power supply voltage])

 


Instruction Set Summary | AVR® Instruction Set Manual

How to search for Microchip PCNs

 

New PIC32CX and PIC32CZ? | AVR Freaks

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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5V Cortex mcus:

Atmel SAMC20 and SAMC21 (2% internal OSC)

NXP E-series (1.5% internal OSC)

Nuvoton - well, lots, they seem to have more 5V than 3V (2%)

GD32, HK32 from China, not so common though

 

I also still prefer 8bitters, even some 8051 based ones. My wonder is why Microchip develops so many AVR variants. For a while I thought Mega0 would be a perfect replacement for some of my older designs (mega8, 88pb, mega644) now I'm not sure. I feel I would go for already an obsolete choice. And I don't prefer Dx series over Mega0 because their internal oscillator spec is just worse - a small step down that can put an entire cpu family off for me. 

 

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rammon wrote:

And I don't prefer Dx series over Mega0 because their internal oscillator spec is just worse - a small step down that can put an entire cpu family off for me. 

 

How so? I think that there are four different requirements for uC oscillators...

 

1) +/-10% for applications when any output event is triggered by an input event. The uC doing nothing timing related

2) Good enough for serial comms, so +/-2%

3) Crystal type accuracy, 20/50ppm or so

4) RTC type accuracy, errors measured in a few seconds a year

 

Both the Mega0 and Dx series will do the first three, no general purpose uC will ever do 4)

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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5V Cortex mcus:

Also a bunch of Cypress parts, including PSOC4 and PSOC5.

 

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rammon wrote:
I don't prefer Dx series over Mega0 because their internal oscillator spec is just worse

 

The DB crystal oscillator worse than Mega0??? Maybe you can point out something in the datasheet; I am unsure what you are looking at. The DA does not have a crystal driver, but the DB has one with a very informative description for how to layout the crystal that would probably pass an EMI test. I wonder if people get jailed or fined for designs that fail EMI testing.

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ron_sutherland wrote:

rammon wrote:
I don't prefer Dx series over Mega0 because their internal oscillator spec is just worse

 

The DB crystal oscillator worse than Mega0??? Maybe you can point out something in the datasheet; I am unsure what you are looking at. The DA does not have a crystal driver, but the DB has one with a very informative description for how to layout the crystal that would probably pass an EMI test. I wonder if people get jailed or fined for designs that fail EMI testing.

"internal oscillator". I don't know how to say that clearer.

 

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rammon wrote:

"internal oscillator". I don't know how to say that clearer.

 

I'm genuinely interested in how it is not as good as the mega0 series.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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Revision History | Getting Started with Timer/Counter Type A (TCA)

B

01/2021

The GitHub repository links are updated. Added the AVR® DA Family OverviewReferences and Revision History sections. Added MCC versions for each use case running on AVR128DA48. Other minor editorial corrections.

TB3217 Getting Started with TCA

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Spence Konde ("Dr Azzy") has put together an impression amount of sort-of user-level documentation the AVR-Dx series chip as part of his implementation of an Arduino Core for them:  https://github.com/SpenceKonde/D...

Yes, a lot of this is oriented toward "how do these chips play in an Arduino environment, since many of the peripherals are differemt?", but ... that has a lot of overlap (IMO) with other AVR users as well.

Of particular interest is an interpretation of the substantial errata of the initial chips: https://github.com/SpenceKonde/D...

 

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Feels like one step forwards two steps back with Microchip. Every time you get something they take something else away.

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I like these boards, basically just all the I/O on pins and a built in programmer. Of course I liked it more when the debuggers were $30 as well.

 

Also glad to see they will keep supporting Atmel Studio. Not a fan of MPLAB X and my worry is that one day they try to force everyone onto that, or just stop putting any effort into AS and letting it slowly die.

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mojo-chan wrote:
Of course I liked it more when the debuggers were $30 as well.
MPLAB Snap meets that; has a case that can be 3D printed.

mojo-chan wrote:
... or just stop putting any effort into AS and letting it slowly die.
I'm concerned too.

 


What are the AVR28DA128 AVR32DA128 AVR48DA128 AVR64DA128 ?? | Page 2 | AVR Freaks (MPLAB X, MPLAB Snap)

Digi-Key's Oh Snap! Enclosure for MPLAB® SNAP Debugger by DigiKey - Thingiverse

AS7.0.2389 Pickit4 and Snap support | AVR Freaks

SNAP with Atmel Studio | AVR Freaks

Getting SNAP to work with AVR on AS7.0.2542 | AVR Freaks

 

Microchip Studio 7.0.2542 | AVR Freaks

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Thanks, I'll take a look at the Snap. Kinda odd they don't offer a case for a few pennies, in volume it wouldn't cost much. Also you need adaptor cables if you are already using the Atmel standard headers...

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mojo-chan wrote:
Also you need adaptor cables if you are already using the Atmel standard headers...
Likewise for PIC.

PICkit 4 - Waveshare Wiki

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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you need adaptor cables if you are already using the Atmel standard headers...

Although, to give credit where it is due, it's much easier to make adapter cables for the SNAP or PicKit4 8-pin 0.1inch single-inline connector than it is for the finer-pitch connectors on an Atmel-Ice type board...

 

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westfw wrote:

you need adaptor cables if you are already using the Atmel standard headers...

Although, to give credit where it is due, it's much easier to make adapter cables for the SNAP or PicKit4 8-pin 0.1inch single-inline connector than it is for the finer-pitch connectors on an Atmel-Ice type board...

 

 

That's certainly true, although I standardized on a 0.1" pitch header for prog/debug so only need an off-the-shelf ribbon cable assembly, with optional pogo plug board. Only needing 3 wires to program is very nice.

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Increased Current Consumption May Occur When VDD Drops

The device may experience increased current consumption of approximately 1.5 mA if VDD drops below 2.1V and is held in the range of 1.9-2.1V. This will only occur if VDD is originally at a higher level and then drops down to the mentioned voltage range."

 

So if you are running from 2 alkaline batteries you are in trouble.

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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