Way off topic. Not an AVR, but could be very interesting.

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I came accross this almost by accident. After all, who would look at Maxim for anything other than Dallas 8051s microcontroller wise?

http://www.maxim-ic.com/products...

Perhaps some of the benchmarks are a little unfair, and there is not a great deal of information, but it will be interesting to see how this develops. Anybody seen a roadmap?

Sacha.

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Well, microcontrollers are getting into everything aren't they?

There is an article on the MAXQ in the latest "Circuit Cellar" - page 78, issue 170, Cantrell, Tom: "A simple plan". It runs 5 pages.

Of particular interest to me is the 16x16 multiplier with 40 bit accumulator. Memory offerings are as yet small (32K and 64K) but I am sure that will change with time! What I don't see yet are mentions of ADC/DAC and PWM offerings.

John

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I love how they benchmark their 16bit version against the 8 bit micros. Kinda like comparing apples to oranges.

Writing code is like having sex.... make one little mistake, and you're supporting it for life.

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glitch wrote:
I love how they benchmark their 16bit version against the 8 bit micros. Kinda like comparing apples to oranges.

Also interesting is that their benchmarks describe their source of data for the MaxQ as "Simulations". Apparently they haven't seen workiing silicon yet. I hope they are better at predicting performance from simulations than Atmel has been.

Scott

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Here's a lot more info about the MAXQ:

Microcontroller Engineering Review #3: http://pdfserv.maxim-ic.com/en/e...
Microcontroller Engineering Review #4: http://pdfserv.maxim-ic.com/en/e...

Most information can be found in MER #4, it desribes the first device in the family.
The first device is called MAXQ2000 and it's from the 16-bit family with the MAXQ20 core.
Later there will alos be relaes device with the 8-bit MAQ10 core.

An IAR C compiler has also been devloped for both MAXQ10 (8-bit) and MAX20 (16-bit) MCUs.

Quote:
MAXQ2000 Features

• 16-Bit RISC Core

• Single-Cycle Execution

• 64kB Flash Memory

• 2kB Data RAM

• 16-Level Hardware Stack

• Four Common, 36-Segment LCD Controller

• Real-Time Clock

• 16 x 16 Multiply with
40-Bit Accumulator


Quote:

The MAXQ2000 has a wide range of integrated peripherals, including:
• 132-segment LCD controller
• Integrated SPI port with master and slave modes
• 1-Wire Bus Master
• Two serial UARTs
• Hardware multiplier
• Three 16-bit timers/counters
• Watchdog timer
• 32-bit real-time clock with subsecond and time-of-day alarms
• JTAG interface with support for in-circuit debugging

No I2C or ADC? :?:
But it supports Maxim/Dallas own 1-Wire Bus.

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There are a number of strange things about these micros. The big one is that there are no "instructions" but "MOV" (well, two moves actually, one being register-register and the other being immediate to register).

Apparently every operation is register-based (like a UART or timer). To add, you move one value to an "sum" operand register, another value to the other "sum" operand register, then read the result in the "sum" output register. That could take some getting used to.

The inclusion of a MAC is interesting and could lead to some mid-range DSP applications (low end being those apps that any sufficiently fast, non-MAC micro can implement).

Personally, I'm a lot more excited about the low-cost ARM "announcement".

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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ka7ehk wrote:
There are a number of strange things about these micros. The big one is that there are no "instructions" but "MOV" (well, two moves actually, one being register-register and the other being immediate to register).

Yes, it has 33 instructions, that is translated in two operations.
Quote:
The MAXQ architecture is based on a very simple concept: all operations are ultimately achieved using a simple transfer operation. Each of the 33 total instructions reduces to either writing an immediate value to a destination register/memory location, or moving data between registers and/or memory locations (Figure 1). The architectural simplicity makes it ideal for tool vendors to optimize code development and use the smallest possible memory requirements for most applications. In addition, each instruction in the MAXQ is processed in a single cycle, ensuring the fastest possible code execution (1 MIPS/MHz). The inclusion of a MAC is interesting and could lead to some mid-range DSP applications (low end being those apps that any sufficiently fast, non-MAC micro can implement).

Does anyone know the max clock frequency of this device? One of the program examples are calibrated to 16 MHz operation, but I don't know if it can run faster than that.

And which voltages will it run at? Is it 5 V compatible?

I couldn't find any info about the number of GPIO pins at the MAXQ2000.

I would like to see how it would be priced compared to AVR and MSP¤30.

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I did a little googeling and found some more info about the MAXQ2000:
http://www.embedded-control-euro...

Quote:
The MAXQ2000 is packaged in a 68-pin QFN, and is available directly from Maxim or through authorized distributors.
Prices start at $2.95 (10,000-up, FOB USA).

How much does the ATmega64 cost for 10,000 up?
They both have 64 kb Flash. MAQX2000 has LCD controler, but ATmega64 has ADC.

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A bit Z8ish :) (Its microcode is showing)
C.H.

C. H.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
It's only waste if you don't use it!

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Major difference is, ATmega64 is available. :shock:

I went to the Maxim-IC site, "price and availability" e-commerce page, and entered MAXQ. (also tried MAXQ2000) 0 results in either case. Wassup? 8) Is marketing ahead of distribution? :lol:

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mneary wrote:
Is marketing ahead of distribution? :lol:

I haven't read any Maxim website or document that claims it's available yet, but I could have missed that information?
The only place I have read that indicates it's available yet is here: http://www.embedded-control-euro...
But I haven't seen any offical Maxim document or website claiming it's avaiable yet.

Not like Atmel that claims a lot of new AVR's are already avialable eventhough they are not.
Atmel's marketing is way ahead of the chip development.
Where can you find ATtiny2313, ATmega88, ATmega 168, ATmega256, ATmega165, ATmega325 or ATmega3250 to name a few?

Try to read this annoucement made a month ago:
http://www.atmel.com/dyn/corpora...

Quote:
The first three devices are available now. The 10ku price of the Mega 165 is $3.25, Mega 325 is $3.95 and the Mega 3250 is $4.45.

It claims that ATmega165, ATmega325 and ATmega3250 was already available a month ago, but a month later I still haven't seen them avaiable anywhere. Can anyone tell me where to find any of these chips?

Comparing the price of the MAXQ2000 to ATmega 325, the MAXQ2000 seems cheap.

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Datasheet for MAXQ2000 is now avaiable: http://www.maxim-ic.com/quick_vi...

Maxim has also made a new press release about the MAXQ MCUs:
DALLAS SEMICONDUCTOR UNVEILS WORLD’S HIGHEST MIPS/mA, 16-BIT, RISC MICROCONTROLLER
http://www.maxim-ic.com/view_pre...