Visual Studio Embedded

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Embedded Software Development in Visual Studio - C++ Team Blog

by Marc Goodner [Program Manager, C++]

December 6th, 2021

We are happy to announce that we have added new embedded development capabilities to Visual Studio 2022 Preview. Used in conjunction with the new vcpkg artifact capabilities you can quickly bootstrap an embedded development machine and get started.

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[a picture with peripheral registers to the left of the source code]

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[OOTB for MXCHIP AZ3166, NXP RT1060, STMicroelectronics STM32L4]

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Installation

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Today we’ll demonstrate using vcpkg from a PowerShell prompt to activate our embedded development environment. In a future release this will be integrated into Visual Studio for a more seamless experience.

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So, in three commands we have cloned our embedded project, installed vcpkg, acquired and activated the necessary tools for building the project.

 

Using Visual Studio for embedded development

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Today vcpkg is not integrated in Visual Studio. So, at present we need to launch Visual Studio from the environment we activated at the command line so those tools are available for its use as well.

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[CMake project, cross-toolchain from vcpkg, cross-debugger from vcpkg]

 

Code Navigation and IntelliSense

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Build, Deploy, and Debug on hardware

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[debugger client, debugger server]

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The information for describing peripheral registers is provided by the MCU manufacturer in an SVD file that we point to with svdPath.

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Peripheral Registers

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RTOS Object Views

[threads view]

There are other views for additional ThreadX objects like block and byte pools, events, mutexes, queues, and timers. We also have RTOS object views for FreeRTOS though the available objects there differ based on what it supports.

 

Hardware breakpoint limits

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Send us your feedback

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If you are on Linux or Mac and looking for similar capabilities, yes, we will be bringing embedded development capabilities to VS Code soon as well. We have provided VS Code getting started guides for Azure RTOS the same boards as VS (...)

https://github.com/azure-rtos/getting-started/tree/master/Microchip

though today the capabilities are limited to acquisition with vcpkg, edit, build, deploy, and debug. Similar embedded specific views will be coming in a future extension.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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via

What we’ve been reading in December | Interrupt (Memfault)

by Tyler Hoffman [Memfault founder]

04 Jan 2022

[near bottom]

 


vcpkg - Open source C/C++ dependency manager from Microsoft

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I love the in built GIT integration in visual studio 2019 and above. Very easy to create local repository no need to type any commands most of the things can be done with GUI.

 

I wish microchip studio had this.

“Everyone knows that debugging is twice as hard as writing a program in the first place. So if you're as clever as you can be when you write it, how will you ever debug it?” - Brian W. Kernighan
“Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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Heisen wrote:
... in built GIT integration in visual studio 2019 and above. ... I wish microchip studio had this.
If Microchip Studio 8 will exist then a Visual Studio extension.

Microchip Studio 7 is an instance of Visual Studio 2015 Isolated Shell (has access to 2015's extensions)

Hopefully, what Marc Goodner's team is creating will be extended by ones at Microchip Technology (AVR SVD, Microchip Studio's AVR GDB server, etc)

Transparency : am an optimist

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller