TortoiseSVN local doesn't match repository? [SOLVED]

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I have a usart directory that shows the ! that indicates it is in synch with the repository, but it isn't since the repository doesn't contain the files in that directory. The picture shows them side by side. Any idea what I'm doing wrong?

Smiley

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Last Edited: Wed. Sep 14, 2011 - 09:22 PM
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I'm assuming that you checked out the tree and the repository has been updated since you checked out this local tree.

SVN is not a "live sync" type of thing.
(RCS systems don't work that way)
It only does updates when you tell it to.
The tortoise SVN status symbols (green checks etc) are indications of how your tree matches to the tree
you checked out not to the repository tree as it may be today.
i.e. they indicate the local changes you have made since your checkout.

So if your local copy was checked out and the repository was updated since that checkout, the local
copy will not match the repository until you do an update
to your local copy and the local SVN status symbols will
not indicate any changes.

I bet if you do an update, that your local tree will
then be updated to match the repository.

--- bill

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Agree with Bill in general.

Still, the usual scenario re such confusions is that ones local working copy is missing files that are in the Subversion repository. Your screen dump above seems to suggest the inverse situation. There are file in your local working copy that are not in the repository. This is quite possible, but not the usual situation.

Questions:

Since you are looking at the repository through a web interface, have you updated the page in your browser?

Have the files that you still see in your local working copy been deleted from the repository (through something other than your local working copy)?

Quote:
shows the ! that indicates it is in synch with the repository

Huh? There is no exclamation mark icon overlay in your dump. (Such an overlay is used by Subversion to indicate a merge conflict.) I suppose you are actually talking about the green check-mark overlays?

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Quote:
This is quite possible, but not the usual situation.
It most certainly is, if you created those files and have failed to add them to repository. Or the administrator has deleted them since you checked them out.
Use a 'resolve conflicts' command to, well, resolve the conflict.

--greg
Still learning, don't shout at me, educate me.
Starting the fire is easy; the hardest part is learning how to keep the flame!

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The problem was that the usart sub folders were listed as 'nested'. So I just copied the whole directory elsewhere, deleted from the local and repository, pasted it back in and added it all again. And now it works. I have no idea how those folders got 'nested'.

Smiley

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:)
Can I interest you in a rather dog-ear'd copy of the Subversion administrator's manual?
:twisted:

http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.5/svn-book.html

--greg
Still learning, don't shout at me, educate me.
Starting the fire is easy; the hardest part is learning how to keep the flame!

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Have you been playing around with the svn:externals propery?

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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Personally Johan, I only ever do it propery :)

ps: clean your damn keyboard!
;)

--greg
Still learning, don't shout at me, educate me.
Starting the fire is easy; the hardest part is learning how to keep the flame!

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Johan: I've played with some of the properties, mainly the exclusion stuff and I don't remember what else.

Greg: I've read the first two chapters of that book and refer to it often for specific problem areas. That doesn't mean I retained much and I still have no idea how these subfolders wound up 'nested'.

Smiley

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GUI: the end of knowing how computers actually work ;)

--greg
Still learning, don't shout at me, educate me.
Starting the fire is easy; the hardest part is learning how to keep the flame!

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gregsmithcts wrote:
GUI: the end of knowing how computers actually work ;)
Didn't they say that about assembly language and every other step up from toggling switches?

To me a GUI is an appropriate use of technology. Moore's law has made computing insanely cheap so if we put 90% of the power to making programming easier, what's the problem?

Smiley

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The point I was making (badly) was that a GUI abstracts away what is actually going under the covers.
It's too easy to drag-drop and screw something up. The O/S usually assumes you know what you are doing when in fact. The drop could be the worst possible thing you could do. I like GUI's, but for file management I usually drop to the command line.

--greg
Still learning, don't shout at me, educate me.
Starting the fire is easy; the hardest part is learning how to keep the flame!