Toaster Oven SMT Assembly

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Anyone using a toaster/convection oven for small-scale production work? If so...

 

  • how are you getting on with it?
  • what type are you using?
  • how reliable is it?
  • what though-put do you get?

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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I'm currently achieving around 4 PPM ( pop-tarts per minute)! Pizzas per minute is slightly less.

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It seems to me that a toaster oven would be far too big for the use of heating a circuit board with components to the 350 degrees Fahrenheit (170 degrees C) needed to melt the solder paste. Most toaster ovens that I'm seen are the size of microwave ovens: big enough to cook turkeys.

 

If 'fusing' components to a 10x10 centimeter board, it would make sense to have a closed high-temperature ceramic box that was 15x15x3 cm in size and could be heated by a high-temperature hot-air gun instead.

Last Edited: Sat. Aug 27, 2016 - 11:58 PM
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 http://www.whizoo.com/ I purchased the oven build kit and built it very closely to the sample on the site. It works really great, a cycle takes about 5 minutes. You really need the boost element(comes with oven build kit) to make it work well. 

 

No issues so far.  I captured and plotted a few reflows with my Agilent meter. The Controleo2 was within 1-3 degrees the entire time and gave me a nice reflow profile. I think the accuracy is good enough.

 

I have done some 9in x 2in LED arrays, some boost controllers, and some QFN micros. All using SAC305 No-Clean, Chipquik SMD291SNL.

The worst part is the damn gold foil tape. Getting in the back corners and between the elements/sheet metal is a real pain in the ass, all while trying to stop the tape from folding onto itself. 

Last Edited: Sun. Aug 28, 2016 - 12:20 AM
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Before I bought my Aoyue 866, I did some boards by using the toaster oven and monitoring the ambient temperature with a thermocouple. The toaster oven did a good job but you need a fan or something to cool the boards. So run the toaster oven, stop it, cool the board with a fan. Taking it out and letting it just sit at room temperature may work, but I wasn't comfortable with the idea of potentially thermally shocking things. 

 

I also purchased one of those T962A reflow oven's for home office use after reading some reviews and thinking, wow, what a great price! The $30 toaster oven and thermocouple worked way better. The T962A's temperature measurements were way, way off. You basically have to set up an offset custom profile, and even then lead-free didn't do well - the temperature in the middle of the oven is significantly warmer than even three to five inches from the center.  For a small run of small single sided boards, I put a piece of copper over the Aoyue's heating pad, soak the boards with that and low temp, low air flow out of the nozzle. I basically visually gauge and use a stopwatch and I've had success with components at .4 mm pitch and 0201. For larger stencils (0603 and larger) I cut on my Cameo, but for fine stencils OSH Stencils is the best low cost option in my opinion. 

 

Whatever you do make sure you have some serious ventilation.

 

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bosleymusic_com wrote:

Before I bought my Aoyue 866...

 

Interesting unit. How is that working out for you?

 

 

bosleymusic_com wrote:

The toaster oven did a good job but you need a fan or something to cool the boards. So run the toaster oven, stop it, cool the board with a fan.

 

I'm thinking of using a toaster oven with a fan already in and using a controller which handles the fan as part of the cycle.

 

 

bosleymusic_com wrote:

I also purchased one of those T962A reflow oven's...

 

Review of those seem to be very mixed with the majority tending to be in the 'cheap but not great' camp.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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amitchell wrote:

 http://www.whizoo.com/ I purchased the oven build kit and built it very closely to the sample on the site. It works really great...

 

Thanks, that's a nice looking setup.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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I worried about melting tall plastic parts like I never use, so I went with the frypan method and heat the board from below. This precludes putting parts on the bottom side. Mine is way bigger than needed but was on sale for half the price of the little one.

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

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The 866 is great - I've monitored the temperatures produced, and the readouts are pretty accurate. I leave the bearings a bit loose on the air guns "stand" and am able to get a decent range of motion out of it without having to hold the gun for minutes on end. I also own the Int 906 and the heating element in the gun died rather quickly. In both cases I'm not a big fan of the irons - once you have used them, the tips are incredibly difficult to change and I have damaged a number of heating elements in doing so. I tend to use my Aven for hand soldering.

 

On the cooling, as long as you have something to anneal the board back down to room temperature in a semi-controlled fashion, you'll be fine.

 

But seriously - make sure you have ventilation regardless of if your materials are lead-free or not. 

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We are using a Breville Toaster Oven and it does a decent job and makes crispy food in a way normal microwave can't.

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That page shows three different Breville Toaster Ovens - so which one are you actually recommending?

 

 

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