tiny voltage operating ranges

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According to Digikey, some at-tinys are designed to work up to 5.5V, (ex attiny44A), while others indicate rating to 3.6V (some attiny44V, though not all).  The 5.5V tiny44V's reference a datasheet that is plain tiny44 (neither 
"A", nor "V"). 

 

In any case, even the 3.6V tiny44v's indicate an absolute damage limit of 6.0V...so does that mean they are usable in 5V circuits? It would seem so, unless some critical analog level was at stake.  Is the lower rating merely to provide specific operating data at 3.6V---but then why not simply include that in the normal 5V datasheet?   Some 5V boards were apparently built using 3.6V parts & there have been programming issues (the question is, is it due to these parts, or something else).  Some parts have mysteriously failed (can no longer connect), though they seem to be running the prior code.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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It has been a while but the diffecrence between the normal and V version was the max operating voltage combined with the maximum operating frequency.

the A/B/C numbers are basically just changes of factory and thus production, although it has also been used to indicate a slight change in functionality. has been very confusing.

copied from the Tiny44 datasheet:

 

Here you can see that both the V and normal verion can run on 5V but that there is a difference in maximum operating frequency.

 

the A version has something in the ordering number it seems:

If you run it at 1,8V the max operating frequency is 4MHz if you set the supply voltage to 2,7V the maximum operating frequency is 10MHz and if you run it at 4,5V it will do 20MHz

 

can it be that you have a to high programming frequency?

Note that on a non V chip you 'can'  program it with up to 250KHz ( safer is 125Khz) but if you run a V version and try to program it at that frequency, or even 125khz you might run into problems.....

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They sure have a strange way of throwing in a dose of confusion...Apparently they are really 5V capable parts (though Digikey lists them otherwise)

 

The front page alludes to this actually just being characterization ranges, though they never directly say (in this doc)* that the parts are just fine at 5V.  (other than the typical dire warning of nor exceeding 6V.

 

http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/atmel-7819_automotive-microcontrollers-attiny24-44-84-appendix-b_datasheet.pdf

 

This appendix "B" must be used along with the main document....then it makes 95% more sense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Aren't all ATmega AVRs and ATtiny AVRs 5V devices?

 

 

[E2A]

The Microchip MAPS selector would appear to confirm that. It says there are a total of 246 8-bit AVR chips. Select only those chips that have a 5V supply rating and it drops to 200 parts; all the ATxmega parts disappear from the list.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

Last Edited: Fri. Feb 1, 2019 - 11:13 AM
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Brian Fairchild wrote:
Aren't all ATmega AVRs and ATtiny AVRs 5V devices?
Mostly yes; there are several 1.8V core RF megaAVR :

ATmega128RFR2 - Wireless Modules - Wireless - Microcontrollers and Processors

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I'm gonna give Digikey a message, they need to get things shipshape, if these attiny44V are really 5V parts:

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Those parametric searches on those shops often are very usefull for initial selction, but seem to have loads of errors. Just take any  of those parameters and sort for the extremes. I won't be surprised if you'd find thousands of components with very unlikely extreme values.

 

Errors in SI prefixes interpretation also seem to be common, but to be fair it was a few years ago since I last bothered to use those parametric searches, but if you gave me 2ct for every error I can find i'd probably be rich soon.

 

 

Doing magic with a USD 7 Logic Analyser: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment/2421756#comment-2421756

Bunch of old projects with AVR's: http://www.hoevendesign.com