Thoughts about Panasonic components?

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Hi - a colleague hates Panasonic. He says that they only manufacture parts for their own products and sell off what components remain to companies like Digi-Key. Thus you can never trust their parts to be available in the future.

Is anybody able to confirm or deny this?

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I've used Panasonic passives for a number of years. They were a common preferred choice at a large commercial bar-code scanner manufacturer I worked for. Never had any problem nor have I spoken to anyone with a problem.

Most of their parts, especially smt, are commodity parts available from multiple sources. Use them, and if there is problem, change to another source!

I've got far more issues with Maxim than Panasonic!

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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ka7ehk wrote:
I've got far more issues with Maxim than Panasonic!

Jim


Availability or failures?

Cheers,

Ross

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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valusoft wrote:
ka7ehk wrote:
I've got far more issues with Maxim than Panasonic!

Jim


Availability or failures?

Cheers,

Ross

Maybe not so much of either… When I was working on the bench it seemed that Maxim likes short lived products and then, they are no more. It seems that, before you can get a product to market, they change something about the pars that short circuits the design and then the changes ripple through the design schedule.

Also, I have seen some second source compatibility issues, as well. Supposedly you second source a part from Maxim that is supposed to be compatible and there is some difference that prevents it's use as a replacement.

And too, while Maxim is pretty good about sampling parts, I have sampled both current and new production devices, only to discover that they weren't agailable, unless in hundreds-thousands piece orders.

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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ka7ehk wrote:
I've got far more issues with Maxim than Panasonic!

Same here. The last time I designed in a Maxim part was about five years ago.

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As to Panasonic components, the company I worked for as a bench technician ordered about 20,000 Panasonic capacitors from a Chinese distributor. After many hundreds of the assemblies were built and delivered to the customer, those assemblies started failing and needless to say, we had an irate customer.

We discovered that it was Panasonic electrolytic capacitors that were failing. We sent some of the capacitors to a company for evaluation and determination of the failure mode.

We were quite surprised to find out that the capacitors weren't Panasonic electrolytic capacitors at all. The heat-shrink and markings were literally identical but, the pressure relief vent on top of the capacitor was not of the pattern that Panasonic used.

The pressure relief is the scoring in the top of the capacitor that splits open when the capacitor builds up too much pressure. This scoring prevents the metal casing from becoming a projectile when it blows off of the capacitor base. Instead, the scoring rips open and the smoke is let out, along with a bunch of electrolytic material and foil.

But Panasonic can't really he held accountable for a counterfeit component. So from that point on, the company started shying from Chinese vendors.

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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Quote:
Thus you can never trust their parts to be available in the future.

The term "future" is relative! In the long term, no part can ever be expected to be available for ever. It's just an economic reality irrespective of whom the manufacturer is!
Get used to it or get caught out!

Charles Darwin, Lord Kelvin & Murphy are always lurking about!
Lee -.-
Riddle me this...How did the serpent move around before the fall?

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Quote:
no part can ever be expected to be available for ever
You mean I can't get 1S2 valves any more? :shock:

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Quote:
You mean I can't get 1S2 valves any more?

OK, I have a few stashed away. How many would you like?
I gather it is for the families B&W all valve HD telly!
Haven't got some 813's stashed away have you?

Charles Darwin, Lord Kelvin & Murphy are always lurking about!
Lee -.-
Riddle me this...How did the serpent move around before the fall?

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My issue with Maxim is how they do their "allocation" when supplies are tight. They are not rare in this practice, only seem to be more aggressive at this than most. By this, I mean that when demand exceeds supply, the parts they have go to biggest customers. If you want smaller quantities, you CAN be out of luck.

I've never had any quality problems with Panasonic parts through reputable channels. When you pinch pennies, you take your chances! And, that is true for any part, not just Panasonic. I believe that even Atmel has been bitten by this.

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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microcarl wrote:
As to Panasonic components, the company I worked for as a bench technician ordered about 20,000 Panasonic capacitors from a Chinese distributor. After many hundreds of the assemblies were built and delivered to the customer, those assemblies started failing and needless to say, we had an irate customer.

We discovered that it was Panasonic electrolytic capacitors that were failing. We sent some of the capacitors to a company for evaluation and determination of the failure mode.

We were quite surprised to find out that the capacitors weren't Panasonic electrolytic capacitors at all. The heat-shrink and markings were literally identical but, the pressure relief vent on top of the capacitor was not of the pattern that Panasonic used.

The pressure relief is the scoring in the top of the capacitor that splits open when the capacitor builds up too much pressure. This scoring prevents the metal casing from becoming a projectile when it blows off of the capacitor base. Instead, the scoring rips open and the smoke is let out, along with a bunch of electrolytic material and foil.

But Panasonic can't really he held accountable for a counterfeit component. So from that point on, the company started shying from Chinese vendors.


It is too bad that almost everybody has switched over to manufacturing vented electrolytics. The unvented ones really make failures much more exciting.

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You can use tantalums. They explode nicely if they are the wrong way round.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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leon_heller wrote:
You can use tantalums. They explode nicely if they are the wrong way round.

Tantalums do provide good fun. I've seen some that have built in protection to protect from explosions. A pity to be sure :)

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I've been using thousands of Panasonic electrolytics for years. They seem to be high quality, and I've had *zero* failures.

Tom Pappano
Tulsa, Oklahoma

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Quote:
I've seen some that have built in protection to protect from explosions.

Can you point us to some references on these protected tantalums?
The only ones that I have had explode are ones that have been wired in arse about! Rarely would you see it unless you were the one who wired it in the arse about and then fired the gear up.
Surely the protected ones, would not be specially designed to prevent reverse polarity, so I wonder what they are protecting against?

Charles Darwin, Lord Kelvin & Murphy are always lurking about!
Lee -.-
Riddle me this...How did the serpent move around before the fall?

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There are tantalums with integral fuses for hi reliability applications.

For example:

http://www.avx.com/docs/Catalogs/taw.pdf

Tom Pappano
Tulsa, Oklahoma

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Thanks Tom,
I have learned something today!

Charles Darwin, Lord Kelvin & Murphy are always lurking about!
Lee -.-
Riddle me this...How did the serpent move around before the fall?