Is there complete documentation for AS 6.2?

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I've been using the Arduino IDE, but I'm ready for something better. I've downloaded AS 6.2 with the extension for Arduino. I've found a few tutorials on how to use the AS IDE in general, but nothing specific. For example: There is an output window, a solution window, and property window that used to be "tabbed" at the edge of the screen. For whatever reason, the 'auto hide' and 'float' option is greyed out and I can't figure out how to make a tab again. Perhaps a global setting somewhere? The other problem I'm having is knowing how to properly delete a project / solution so I can reuse the project name. I went into windows explorer and deleted the project, but AS says the old name is still in use. Not sure what to do there.

 

As you can tell, I know only enough to be dangerous with this IDE. I would like to learn about it in great detail, but I can't seem to find any detailed documents anywhere. Are there certain key words I should be using to find this info? I found the tutorial at Atmel to be very limited.  I don't mind digging for the info I'm looking for, if it exists - I just don't know where I should be digging. Any suggestions?

 

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Try using the Visual Micro  plugin for VS 6.2. A world of difference.

Also, Microsoft's Visual Studio 2013 Community edition is now free - download. Visual Micro  plugin works with it too.

(you probably know that VS 6.2 is Microsoft's Visual Studio 2010 tailored by Atmel).

 

I use these for all my Arduino and Teensy 2, Teensy 3 work.

 

http://www.visualmicro.com/  (also free; debugger option is low cost).

 

 

Last Edited: Mon. Feb 23, 2015 - 04:15 AM
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I've downloaded AS 6.2 with the extension for Arduino.

Try using the Visual Micro  plugin for VS 6.2.

Surely those are the same thing?   I think he's asking for general VS documentation.  It seems to be a bad trend in Development Environments to say "Based on VS/NetBeans/Eclipse/CodeBlocks/etc.  Therefore we don't have to write a lot of documentation!"  (Arduino gets dinged on this pretty often as well, for not documenting all of C/C++ on their 'reference page'.)

 

It's a good question.   Is there good documentation for any of these common IDEs?  I'd guess that they'd be books: something that describes the philosophy of workspaces and projects and targets and solutions and ... whatever, rather than just "follow this tutorial to create and compile your first project!"  Done!"

 

(VS2013: The Missing Manual ?)

 

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stevech wrote:
you probably know that VS (sic) 6.2 is Microsoft's Visual Studio 2010 tailored by Atmel

 

You mean, "AS 6.2 is MSVS tailored by Atmel"

 

Yes, Atmel Studio is built on MS Visual Studio - so, in general, VS documentation is applicable.

 

westfw wrote:
It seems to be a bad trend in Development Environments to say "Based on VS/NetBeans/Eclipse/CodeBlocks/etc.  Therefore we don't have to write a lot of documentation!"  

Yes, it does.

 

angry

 

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As to how you dock windows. It's done pretty much the same in most IDEs these days isn't it? You star tto drag the sub-window you want to position and as you drag it into various areas of the screen you will see a four arrow "cursor cluster" appear. If you drag the mouse contact point of the window you are dragging to the right pointing arrow (say) you will see it highlight as you are over it. As you let go of the mouse it will then become a tile in that quadrant of the screen area you just dragged it too. If instead of one of the four arrows you drop it on the square in the middle of those four it will occupy the entire region of that screen area. This is all very standard stuff.

 

Having just typed all that I tried a google for "positioning windows in microsoft visual studio" and hit this page in their user manual:

 

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us...

 

Of more interest is the link on that page "How to: Arrange and Dock Windows"

 

As others here have said. AS6 is just a cut down copy of Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 so just use the Microsoft manual when you want to explore anything about the "infrastructure" such as window positioning etc.

 

EDIT: forgot to say that the Microsoft manual covers multiple versions of Visual Studio so you want to use the drop list near the top of any page and make sure it is set to "2010" in fact. The docking info for the 2010 version is actually here:

 

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us...

Last Edited: Mon. Feb 23, 2015 - 09:35 AM
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Thanks, guys - 

I had no idea AS6 was a version of Microsoft Visual Studio 2010. In fact, I've never even heard of it. As you may have guessed, my experience falls into the "aging dog, new tricks" category. Until the last few years, I designed everything using analog circuits. Micro controllers opens up a whole new way of doing things for me. 

Now that I understand that AS6 is a variant of Microsoft VS, I have a place to dig for information.

I agree with the above comments regarding one IDE being similar to others, so there seems to be no desire to document. I suppose that's true if you've been involved in it for any length of time. But everyone had to get a start somewhere - they had to be shown how to do things with some explanation.  Getting that start when college is a distant memory is a bit more challenging. 

 

Thanks again - greatly appreciated.

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I forgot to mention that there is an AS6 manual online too:

 

http://www.atmel.com/webdoc/atme...

 

Though for the life of me I cannot spot anything there about dragging/docking windows.

Last Edited: Mon. Feb 23, 2015 - 02:58 PM
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clawson - Yes, that's the info that left me with more questions than it answered. I did manage to figure out the tabs for the windows: just hit the pin symbol. That was easy. Just takes time to figure these things out.

 

I have stumbled into a section of MS VS by way of previous responses, and that has been quite helpful. The only other IDE I've (tried) to use has been MicroChip's MPLAB X. Too many things that don't work like they're supposed to, etc.

I'm hopeful I'll be able to grasp this IDE a little easier.

 

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Don't bank on it - it was written by Microsoft!

 

(having said that I shouldn't knock Microsoft particularly - my phone just updated from Google's Android 4 to Android 5 and seems to prove that ALL software companies enjoy irritating their users with impenetrable user interfaces)