Super set of ATMega328P-PU available?

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I use the ATMega328P-PU  (28 pin) in my projects. I have "standardized" it and I am happy with it. I like working with it and are learing as much as I can (time permitting) about it.

 

Some times I wish i had more digital / analog pins (with out a multiplexer)  or a second USART (with out software emulation) and so on.

 

I have looked through the Atmel stuff I can find on the internet and are not sure of exactly what I have seen:

 

I am looking for a chip that is a super set of the 328P-PU, something with maybe 40 or 60 or so DIP pins.  I know the 2580 is "bigger / better" but it does not come in a removable DIP package.  So does such an animal exist? So I can use my Arduino source code  developed for the 328P-PU seamlessly on this "bigger" chip and take advantages (as needed) of it's additional abilities  AND has a removable DIP pin arrangement.

 

If such a creature is out there... please tell me. 

 

Thank you!

 

Sam

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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The closest family to your description is the AtMegaxx4 family. 40 pin DIP (AtMega164, AtMega324, AtMega644, AtMega1284). Love these avr's

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I used the Atmel Parametric Product Selector and filtered it for 8-bit AVRs with two or more UARTS, 10 and more ADC channels. Disregarding the XMegas, I came up with only the ATmega640/1280/2560 and the ATtiny441/841. None of them are available in DIP.

 

Have you pondered these alternatives, if DIP is crucial:

- Several ATmega328 in a network of some sort (will also offer more ADC channels)

- Build an adapter board that takes a 2560 and has a DIP pin-out (I went Googling for such, but found none that was actually a 64 pin DIP. 2x2 rows, yes. Two rows-in-a-square, yes. Two rows spaced 0.3 or 0.6? No!)

 

We are slowly forced into SMD techniques by circumstances at least partly beyond our control. At some time it will be right to give in.. (I've investigated the market of/for hot-air equipment several times now but never really managed to put the foot down somewhere. One of these days..)

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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N2EEE wrote:
(AtMega164, AtMega324, AtMega644, AtMega1284)
+1

 

(The "P" ones of course - that is 164P, 324P, 644P, 1284P)

 

They have 2 UARTs. But the ADC multiplexer still only offers 8 inputs.

 

If you want "lots of UARTs" and "lots of ADCs" then perhaps the Xmega range beckon?

 

Downside of Xmega: 3.3V only (no 5v) and apart from some that I have in a box that Atmel sent me as a "special present" you won't see Xmegas in DIP packages.

 

Of course if you reach Xmega specs. then I would just take the next obvious step and go for Cortex M0, M3, M4 and leave 8 bit behind all together.

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clawson wrote:
Of course if you reach Xmega specs. then I would just take the next obvious step and go for Cortex M0, M3, M4 and leave 8 bit behind all together.

+1

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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AVR_Beginner wrote:
So does such an animal exist?
Not in AVR but in ST7 :

http://www.mouser.com/search/ProductDetail.aspx?R=0virtualkey0virtualkeyST72F324J6B5 (PDIP-56)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I'll see your DIP56 and raise you a DIP64 (sadly not a uC but a display controller)(with a 328 for comparison)

...

 

 

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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clawson wrote:
Downside of Xmega: 3.3V only (no 5v) ...
Level translators are in tiny packages so it's somewhat easy to attach one, or more, to an XMEGA port(s)

MattairTech LLC

MattairTech

MT-DB-X3 Atmel AVR XMEGA 64-pin A3U / A3BU / C3 / D3 USB development board

https://www.mattairtech.com/index.php/development-boards/mt-db-x3-atmel-avr-xmega-64-pin-a3u-a3bu-c3-d3-usb-development-board.html

...

Optionally, a 5V, 500mA low quiescent current (23uA) LDO regulator can also be installed, which supports up to 24V input. Along with the 5V regulator, an 8-bit auto-direction sensing level shifter is installed, to provide level conversion between XMEGA Vcc and 5V (or 3.3V).

...

clawson wrote:
Of course if you reach Xmega specs. then I would just take the next obvious step and go for Cortex M0, M3, M4 and ...
A new product from MattairTech is an ARM Cortex-M0+ or M4F that can be powered from a 12V battery and connect to a cellular modem :

MattairTech LLC

MattairTech

Xeno Advanced - SAMD21 / L21 / C21 / D51* ARM Cortex Xbee Cellular USB development board with motor controller

https://www.mattairtech.com/index.php/development-boards/xeno-advanced.html

https://www.digi.com/products/xbee-rf-solutions/embedded-cellular-modems

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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There are of course gazillions of DIL modules with bigger chips on from just about any family range you care to mention. TBH, once you are comfortable programming an AVR in C, making the leap to a different chip range isn't that hard.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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JohanEkdahl wrote:
I went Googling for such, but found none that was actually a 64 pin DIP. 2x2 rows

Here you go:

Image result for dip-64

http://www.proto-advantage.com/s...

 

 

They even do an 80-dip one:

Image result for dip-80

http://www.proto-advantage.com/s...

 

But, to be honest, looking at that should immediately show why DIP over about 40 pins is just plain impractical!

 

You really wouldn't want to go "removing" that too often ...

 

surprise

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Dip packages are so 20th century!  Time to up your skills to SMD and join the fun, its just not that hard to learn!

 

Jim

 

Click Link: Get Free Stock: Retire early! PM for strategy

share.robinhood.com/jamesc3274

 

 

 

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awneil is quicker than me!

JohanEkdahl wrote:
... Two rows spaced 0.3 or 0.6? No!)
Yes at 600mil (15.2mm) with a PCB that's 1000mil (25.4mm) wide :

Proto Advantage 

Proto Advantage

TQFP-100 to DIP-100 SMT Adapter (0.5 mm pitch, 14 x 14 mm body)

http://www.proto-advantage.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=2200161

in Search enter TQFP-100 to see the kit if want to DIY.

JohanEkdahl wrote:
(I've investigated the market of/for hot-air equipment several times now but never really managed to put the foot down somewhere. One of these days..)
A low price alternative to hot air is a hoof bit on the soldering iron then drag solder SMD (akin to wave soldering, liquid flux or paste flux)

Some posts here on drag soldering QFP.

Might be able to drag solder QFN (I haven't tried); hot air may be better for QFN and DFN.

 

P.S.

A relatively new arrival at Allied Electronics and Mouser Electronics that is soldering pencil and/or hot air gun pencil :

Mouser Electronics  - Electronic Components Distributor

Apex Tool Group WT1 and WT1H Soldering Stations

Mouser Electronics

Apex Tool Group WT1 and WT1H Soldering Stations

http://www.mouser.com/new/apextoolgroup/apex-wt1-wt1h-soldering/

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Fri. Oct 13, 2017 - 03:44 PM
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gchapman wrote:
Level translators are in tiny packages so it's somewhat easy to attach one, or more, to an XMEGA port(s)

OP seems to be in love with some DIP.

 

Brian Fairchild wrote:
There are of course gazillions of DIL modules with bigger chips on from just about any family range you care to mention.

So, until OP wants to lay out a custom production board design, why not just have your cake and eat it to by getting an Arduino Mega which gives you access to all the signals "through hole", probably has power conditioning and reset circuit and ISP and connectors and ..., and maybe a couple buttons and LEDs?

 

...and will probably cost less than getting a few pieces of the AVR itself.

 

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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And, of course, there's the XPlained-Mini boards:

http://www.atmel.com/tools/MEGA168-XMINI.aspx

http://www.atmel.com/tools/MEGA328P-XMINI.aspx

  

 

 

board area is probably no more than a DIP adaptor!

 

and you get a full debugger!

 

There's also an XPlained-Pro:

 

http://www.atmel.com/tools/ATMEGA324PB-XPRO.aspx?tab=overview

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Thank you everyone!

 

Theusch: Arduino Mega would be the obvious answer.  I have played with them, testing. My projects are battery powered in remote places and not easily accessed especially in the winter at -20 F   and 4' of snow!

 

So the Mega fits the bill BUT I can not get the kind of power savings I can with a bare bones 328P-PU in sleep mode.  If I could get the Mega chip by its self that is what i am trying to see.

 

Ergo my dilemma.

 

Sam

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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AVR_Beginner wrote:
My projects are battery powered in remote places and not easily accessed especially in the winter at -20 F and 4' of snow!

What does that have to do with insisting on DIP parts?

 

AVR_Beginner wrote:
So the Mega fits the bill BUT I can not get the kind of power savings I can with a bare bones 328P-PU in sleep mode.

Why not?  [on the surface, that claim doesn't make much sense to me.  yes, if a regulator there may be losses--but just don't use it, if you power from battery directly]

 

 

[especially if socketed, I'd think that DIP chips offer more opportunity for power loss due to corrosion, socket capacitance, and the like]

 

 

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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AVR_Beginner wrote:
So the Mega fits the bill BUT I can not get the kind of power savings I can with a bare bones 328P-PU in sleep mode.

Perhaps I think I see what you are saying ... if you use an Arduino/clone based on Mega2560 then that generation of AVR doesn't have as many power saving features.  But aren't there Arduino model lines based on other Mega models?  Dunno.

 

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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AVR_Beginner wrote:

My projects are battery powered in remote places and not easily accessed especially in the winter at -20 F   and 4' of snow!

I hope that 'Freak ka7ehk comes across this thread, as his current life seems to involve developing remote sensor/monitors.  Perhaps he can comment whether DIP means better designs.

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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theusch wrote:
f you use an Arduino/clone based on Mega2560 then that generation of AVR doesn't have as many power saving features.  But aren't there Arduino model lines based on other Mega models?  Dunno.

 

Exactly what I am trying to say.  The Mega2560 has all the bells and whistles I want (and i assume my 328P-PU code will run with almost no mods) but more critically it is a full board, just like a Uno clone board, and thus a power hog.  So I seem to be able to have one thing (super sent of the 328P-PU's capabilities)  OR  great power savings (sleep modes with out all the extra power consumption of a board with LEDs, power converters, etc) but not both.  

 

I am not aware of any 2560 clone boards that just have the pin headers with out all the extra stuff I don't want.

 

Ergo my dilemma.

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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JohanEkdahl wrote:
Build an adapter board that takes a 2560

 

That is what I was hoping to do. For me the 2560 is ideal (from what i have read and assuming I do not have to re-write all my 328P-PU code).  The problem is unlike the 328P-PU it only comes as a complete board: like an Uno.  So I would have to hack away at the SMT of each board to get rid of the power regulator, LEDs and other junk: and I am sure I will make a mess of it and ruin each and every board in the process.

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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AVR_Beginner wrote:
The Mega2560 has all the bells and whistles I want (and i assume my 328P-PU code will run with almost no mods) but more critically it is a full board, just like a Uno clone board, and thus a power hog.

 

There is no reason to make that leap.  [I reworded my initial response of a bovine variety...]

 

Indeed, if you are running a 'PA with a sleeping BOD and deep sleep modes -- a '2560 of a previous generation won't have as low average uA.

 

But a few uA, while it might indeed be a critical criterion in your design, is not a reason to jump to "power hog" without justification.  My low-power production apps over the years are "full boards".

 

Indeed, a '2560-based board may not be suitable for your app, for whatever reasons.  But that isn't what I advocated -- I suggested getting a ready-made dev platform to avoid the apparent DIP requirement.

 

 

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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theusch wrote:
I suggested getting a ready-made dev platform to avoid the apparent DIP requirement.  
   That would suit the bill for me. 

 

Sorry for the "power hog" comment.  I will refrain from making such comments in the future, except in the cases of Harvey W. and my ex-mother in law.  :-)

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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AVR_Beginner wrote:
So the Mega fits the bill BUT I can not get the kind of power savings I can with a bare bones 328P-PU in sleep mode.  If I could get the Mega chip by its self that is what i am trying to see.

mega2560, 15microA max (power down with WDT)

mega1284P, 1microA max estimated (power save with 32KHz)

mega324PB, 2microA max estimated (power save with 32KHz)

 

Last two might work if willing to remove the no multiplexer requirement.

Are port expanders (via TWI or SPI) acceptable?

 

Could power cycle the mega2560 but the charge for POR and LDO would need to be evaluated.

https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/first-time-working-battery-power-am-i-going-down-right-path

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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How about an ATtiny1634, 20 pin dip, two usarts, may not have as much io though.

 

Jim

 

Click Link: Get Free Stock: Retire early! PM for strategy

share.robinhood.com/jamesc3274

 

 

 

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Will all my code written for the 328P-PU still work on these boards? 

 

I am going to take another look to whats out there. If I can only find a 2560 board that is stripped down that would work for me. But then i guess I need a different cable to up load my code but that should not be a big deal.

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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If only I can disable ALL the extra stuff on the Mega 2560 board (LEDs, power converter, etc) then I would have basically what i want.  My code seems to run fine (so far on the board) and I assume I can do all the "sleep mode" tricks I do on the 328P-PU board as well.

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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I use ATmega1284P's in the 40 pin DIP package.  Pin numbers for I2C and SPI are different, as are timer registers, I think, but other than that all my ATmega328P code runs fine.

 

BTW, I just saw this picture of the 328 on the Microchip site.  No more Atmel, and apparently no more date.

 

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MarkThomas:

 

Thank you for the tip: I am gonna read up on it now.

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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Just looked at the 1284: This is what I am looking for in the right direction.  i would like more USARTs but 2 will surfice. 3 interupt pins is still better than to.

 

If my code can port with minimal re-write this might work.

 

Thank you every one!

 

Thank you MarkThomas!!

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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If you need more UARTs you might be able to copy your code into the Arduino IDE and use the Arduino SoftwareSerial function, which seems to work. You need to compile in Verbose mode and then find the .hex file at the bottom of the IDE to download to flash in the 1284P using your regular programmer.  There seems to be lots of stuff in Google about using the 1284P with Arduino.  The IDE will compile straight C code just fine, at least for the ATmega328P.  You don't have to use any of the Arduino functions or pin numbers, and you don't need the Arduino bootloader to program the ATmega if you use your usual programmer and the generated .hex file.  The usual PORTs and PINs compile fine.  I don't know if this helps, but it is one way I have thought about to use the Arduino libraries.  I have only experimented with copying a C project into the Arduino IDE, compiling, and getting the .hex file.  I have never actually used any of the Arduino libraries for anything; just thought about it.

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MarkThomas wrote:
There seems to be lots of stuff in Google about using the 1284P with Arduino.
The Arduino framework is in PlatformIO with 15 mega1284P boards.

http://platformio.org/boards (ATmega1284 into the MCU box)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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The ATMEGA328PB has extra I/O pins (some power pins of the old '328 device went away & became port E), Dual UARTS, more 16 bit timers,  more SPI  & IIC connections

Sadly, no DIP version, but this gives a little extra over the stock '328

 

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Sat. Oct 14, 2017 - 04:33 AM
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i would like more USARTs but 2 will surfice

That will take you back into the ATmega640/1280/2560, 100 pin beasties. But not PDIP, will need to use an adapter like shown above.
 

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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AVR_Beginner wrote:
 i would like more USARTs 

If it's lots of USARTs (or UARTs?) that you need then, as I'm sure has already been mentioned, Cortex is the way to go

 

Pretty sure there are SAMs with 7 & more UARTs ... 

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Thank you everyone!

 

 

I am gonna try out the 1284:  It seems to meet my criteria (more pins, more USARTs) and is a DIP package (so i can make a bare bones board).  If my 328P-PU code (Arduino) compiles and loads with minimal work and I can play the same "memory saving calls" on the board that should work for me. Thank you all again!

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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AVR_Beginner wrote:

I am gonna try out the 1284:  It seems to meet my criteria (more pins, more USARTs) and is a DIP package (so i can make a bare bones board). 

 

One thing to watch on the 1284P...there can be issues if your layout is not 100% solid and you are not running in full swing crystal mode. There seems to be some sort of odd interaction between the second serial port and the oscillator. Run in full swing and you'll not have a problem but that might impact your low power aspirations.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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Brian:  Thank you for the heads up.  If you mean full MHz the XTAL is meant for then yes, i never try to save power by reducing clock speed.  I try to balance the savings in power vs. eliminating yet one more thing to go wrong and have to figure out during a debugging in the field.  I will keep your tip in mind, thank you!

 

 

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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AVR_Beginner wrote:

If you mean full MHz the XTAL is meant for then yes, i never try to save power by reducing clock speed.

 

Full speed isn't the issue but full swing. (section 9.4 in the data sheet)

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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I just now saw my "name" referenced, up in the thread. I don't use DIP because I want smaller size AND pick/place manufacturing.

 

If you look at the Electrical Characteristics of the spec sheet, there is nothing about power consumption differences based on package type. That is because they all use the same die inside. Its just how that chip is wire-bonded (or what ever else the manufacturing process uses for versions like LCC or BGA) out. DIP and SMT all use the same die, same pin drivers, same oscillators, same everything because it IS the same die. 

 

Yes, for development, DIP can be easier to work with. Yes, for maker projects, DIP can be easier to work with. But, as was shown above with the "breakout" boards, you can have an SMT version that you can work with in DIP form. Seems to me to be a non-issue.

 

Now, when it comes to parts with more .... like more UARTS or more GPIO pins, then you are no longer talking about the same chip. More pins, especially. DIP packages are expensive. They are especially expensive when it comes to putting the chip into the lead frame and making the pin connections. And, as far as industry is concerned, area means coins of the realm. Smaller means less cost (and more profit or more competitiveness). You do not get small with a 48-pin DIP! Makers, so sorry, but you are NOT where the money is.

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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Brian Fairchild wrote:
Full speed isn't the issue but full swing. (section 9.4 in the data sheet)

It is Section 9.4 in the 1/2015 datasheet but Section 10.4 in the 10/2016 data sheet. 

 

I didn't know this was a problem.  Thanks Brian.  I always use full swing these days after Cliff recommended it.

 

AVR_beginner, full swing means you can get a clock signal off of the XTAL2 pin, I believe.  You need to set the fuse to full swing, and use the longest startup time to make sure the crystal gets started OK, unless you need the chip to start right away after power up.  Most of the Arduino's I've seen don't use full swing, I guess because it needs more power.

 

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MarkThomas:  Sounds like stuff way out of my league for now. I will keep life simple and just use the regular millisecond and microsecond timing marks 

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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But don't forget to set the clock fuse to full swing to avoid the problem Brian brings up.

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Select one of the full swing crystal modes from the fuses, the one shown should work well.

 

 

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

Last Edited: Sat. Oct 14, 2017 - 09:36 PM
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My understanding is on the latest chip fab builds any external xtal is limited to 16MHz, regardless of settings.  If you want to go up to 20MHz ,you must apply an oscillator (essentially a signal generator), not an xtal & select the proper fuse.  Not sure if there is a list of chips so effected.   So throw your 20MHz xtals away for those  (:

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Sat. Oct 14, 2017 - 10:21 PM
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OK: dumb question here (please keep in mind I have touched a 1284P yet).  Does any of this "full swing" stuff apply to the 328P I am already using extensivly?  In other words: is there something i havebeen mssing all along?

 

I keep my 328P at 16MHZ (The XTAL) even when in sleep mode. I have not mucked around with trying to slow down the clock.  the reason being my devices operate in harsh environments (deep cold that can get to -40C / -40F) so i don't want to push that envelope yet.

 

So... do i need to start learning about "full swing" for the 328P or am I free to go happily on my way in blissful ignorance (for now)?

I am a new AVR programmer. I am learning alone out of books, the Internet, etc. Please excuse me if I ask simple questions. Thanks.

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avrcandies wrote:
Not sure if there is a list of chips so effected.
PB megaAVR

A possible work-around for mega168PB is tiny1617 with a port expander as tinyAVR 1-series have a 20MHz (+/-3% typ) RC oscillator.

avrcandies wrote:
So throw your 20MHz xtals away for those  (:
A 20MHz CMOS MEMS oscillator with a level translator (3V to 5V) is a mega328PB alternative but would consume an estimated 1mA more than mega328P 20MHz full swing internal crystal oscillator.

 


http://www.microchip.com/wwwproducts/en/attiny1617

http://www.microchip.com/wwwproducts/en/DSC6000

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Full swing setting is being removed from at least some (all?) of the chips...this mostly implies you can't go above 16MHz using an xtal, but you can with an oscillator (now.... don't ask what's an xtal oscillator).

 

https://hackaday.com/2016/05/03/atmel-removes-full-swing-crystal-oscillator/

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Here is a sheet from old freaks posting listing the chips affected, at least back in 2015

 

https://media.digikey.com/pdf/PCNs/Atmel/WC154601.pdf

 

Interesting to learn from this document (page 2) they have some of their chips made by Panasonic!!!

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Does any of this "full swing" stuff apply to the 328P I am already using extensivly?

Yep! Just open your fuse settings and see.

 

 

 

and a screen shot from the old AS4.18

 

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

Last Edited: Sun. Oct 15, 2017 - 01:51 AM
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Yep! Just open your fuse settings and see.

Does that work?  in other words, does studio know if you are connected to an old mega48 that supports full swing vs a newer on that does not?  Even on the newer chips, perhaps you can still set the fuse bits to a non-existent mode (such as burning in old elf files into a newer chip that lacks full swing)...Maybe this was all seamlessly taken care of by the latest studio upgrades, making an illegal selections impossible?  Maybe all you will see is studio allowing you to set (& see ??) modes that don't actually exist.

 

For interest, I visited Atmel's site & downloaded all the '168 & also'328 datasheets.  Many datasheets (2015 & later) indicated full swing as though nothing changed and made no mention of change; others listed it--but only way back in the revisions section, it said the mode was not available!  In other sheets, it was deleted from the descriptions in the first place....so much for chaos & wondering what is going on!

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Sun. Oct 15, 2017 - 02:28 AM

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