Suggest books about electronics, AVR, USB and HID, please.

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Hey guys, I want to know how to build my own USB HID devices from scratch. More specifically, I want to be able to build devices like mouses, keyboards, xbox/ps gamepads, DInput joysticks, wheels, etc.

I've already built some HID devices in the past but I used Arduino and libraries made by other people and I don't really understand how it all works behind the scenes.

 

I don't really know electronics and AVRs, so I'll have to read 1-2 introductory books about electronics and AVRs. And then I'd probably have to read a book about USB and then another one about HID, or something, I don't know.

I am currently studying C#, C++ and CAD modeling.

 

Can you please recommend me some books that you think will help me?

 

I am comfortable with programming part(C# .net), I understand main programming concepts and how to write programs - object oriented programming principles, design patterns, algorithms, etc., and I can write programs from scratch. I can also model stuff good enough to be able to model cases for devices I want to make.

Last Edited: Mon. Jun 10, 2019 - 09:08 AM
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It's unlikely you will find anything better than the books by Jan Axelson to learn the basics of USB.

 

For AVR (assuming you use some mega-USB) then also get LUFA and use that. It takes all the hard work out of doing USB bcause the author, Dean Camera, already did all the Axelson and datasheet studying for you and just produced a complete working solution for USB on mega AVRs

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Also, download a copy of the datasheet for the chip you

plan to use and read it.  Skip over stuff you don't care

about first time through.  Every configuration option for

every part of the chip is explained in it so it is your

primary reference.  You'll eventually re-read the data

sheet a few times.  Print out the Register Summary

which is found near the end of the document for easy

reference.

 

--Mike

 

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avr-mike wrote:

Every configuration option for

every part of the chip is explained in it so it is your

primary reference. 

Except that (IMAO) the datasheets for chips with USB don't really give enough info in the chapters on USB to attempt an implementation. I guess LUFA proves it is ultimately possible but I think Dean got a lot of direct advice from Atmel.

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USB Complete books by Jan Axelson is the best option for you to learn all the basics.