Stereo headphone jack pinout

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Hello

 

I am working with a stereo head phone back but I cant figure what pin relates to what.I downloaded the data sheet but I still cant make out what is what. There is no labeling in the data sheet as to what is ground and what is left in or right in. Could some one please tell me.

 

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They mention sleeve ring and tip, but I want to know what is ground and what is left_in and right_in.

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https://robrobinette.com/images/Audio/TRS_Pinout.jpg

 

 

 

http://qph.is.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-4b589f6f2a795390476033df660f95b0?convert_to_webp=true

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

Last Edited: Sun. Jun 7, 2015 - 12:49 PM
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I am asking about the female jack not the male. I already posted a pic.

Last Edited: Sun. Jun 7, 2015 - 01:04 PM
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Pin 4 is TIP.

Pin 1 is RING.  (Sometimes called BAND.)

Pin 5 is SLEEVE.  (Sometimes called BARREL.)

 

In consideration of others, please RTFM!

Last Edited: Sun. Jun 7, 2015 - 01:14 PM
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How is that different?

 

The male connector fits the female connector.  The male 'tip' connects to the female 'tip', etc.

 

You seemed confused about what the terms tip/ring/sleeve meant.  You also seemed confused about which was used for ground/left/right.  That's what I showed you.

 

If you are confused about which is tip/ring/sleeve on a female connector, it should be obvious from the schematic, and from a knowledge of the male connector.

 

From the photo you posted:

Pin 4: tip

Pin 1: ring

Pin 5: sleeve

 

The remaining pins are for routing when the male connector is absent:

Pin 3: tip disconnect

Pin 2: ring disconnect

 

 

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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joeymorin wrote:

How is that different?

 

The male connector fits the female connector.  The male 'tip' connects to the female 'tip', etc.

 

You seemed confused about what the terms tip/ring/sleeve meant.  You also seemed confused about which was used for ground/left/right.  That's what I showed you.

 

If you are confused about which is tip/ring/sleeve on a female connector, it should be obvious from the schematic, and from a knowledge of the male connector.

 

From the photo you posted:

Pin 4: tip

Pin 1: ring

Pin 5: sleeve

 

The remaining pins are for routing when the male connector is absent:

Pin 3: tip disconnect

Pin 2: ring disconnect

 

 

 

So what is left_in and right_in from the female jack? and what is ground in it.

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youthreewire wrote:
So what is left_in and right_in from the female jack? and what is ground in it.

 

joeymorin wrote:
From the photo you posted:

Pin 4: tip

Pin 1: ring

Pin 5: sleeve

 

From the photos I posted:

   Tip: left

  Ring: right

Sleeve: ground

 

Is that really not enough to conclude that:

 Pin 4: left

 Pin 1: right

 Pin 5: ground

 

?

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

Last Edited: Sun. Jun 7, 2015 - 01:32 PM
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How about this . . .

 

Pin 4 is LEFT.

Pin 1 is RIGHT.

Pin 5 is GROUND.

 

In consideration of others, please RTFM!

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What do pins 2 and 3 do?

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youthreewire wrote:
What do pins 2 and 3 do?

 

joeymorin wrote:
The remaining pins are for routing when the male connector is absent:

Pin 3: tip disconnect

Pin 2: ring disconnect

 

Really, just look at the schematic which you posted.  It should be clear what each and every pin does.

 

When there is no male connector inserted, pin 1 is shorted to pin 2, and pin 4 is shorted to pin3.  When a male connector is inserted, those shorts are broken and pins 2 and 3 remain unconnected.

 

This type of connector is used on, for example, radios which have internal speakers.  When headphones are not connected, the left/right signals are routed to the internal speakers.  When headphones are inserted, the speakers are automatically disconnected.

 

Have a look here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phone_connector_%28audio%29

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

Last Edited: Sun. Jun 7, 2015 - 02:08 PM
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This is yet another test to see if a question with a simple answer that seems obvious to an engineer with thirty years of experience will receive a snippy snarky answer essentially calling the questioner inferior.

 

Imagecraft compiler user

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joeymorin wrote:

 

youthreewire wrote:

What do pins 2 and 3 do?

 

 

 

joeymorin wrote:

The remaining pins are for routing when the male connector is absent:

 

Pin 3: tip disconnect

Pin 2: ring disconnect

 

 

Really, just look at the schematic which you posted.  It should be clear what each and every pin does.

 

When there is no male connector inserted, pin 1 is shorted to pin 2, and pin 4 is shorted to pin3.  When a male connector is inserted, those shorts are broken and pins 2 and 3 remain unconnected.

 

This type of connector is used on, for example, radios which have internal speakers.  When headphones are not connected, the left/right signals are routed to the internal speakers.  When headphones are inserted, the speakers are automatically disconnected.

 

Have a look here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phone_connector_%28audio%29

 

I am planning to solder wires from a mic to the pins and you are saying that if I dont insert a male jack the pins wont take in the signal from the mic? So I need to use male connector only to work with the female connector?

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bobgardner wrote:
This is yet another test to see if a question with a simple answer that seems obvious to an engineer with thirty years of experience will receive a snippy snarky answer essentially calling the questioner inferior.
A fair point Bob, but that is not what is happening at all.

 

It's not about experience or lack thereof.  The issue in these threads is the apparent lack of any desire on the part of some people to do their own work, relying instead on someone else to come along and give all of the answers.

 

True, I knew from experience the answer to the OP's question, but even had I not it would have taken about 2 minutes of Googling to find that answer.  In fact that's how I found the photos I posted in my first reply.  If the OP is unfamiliar with how to use Google, how did they stumble across AVR Freaks in the first place? ;)

 

In any event the OP has not really given enough information for a proper answer:

 

Quote:
I am working with a stereo head phone back but I cant figure what pin relates to what.I downloaded the data sheet but I still cant make out what is what. There is no labeling in the data sheet as to what is ground and what is left in or right in. Could some one please tell me.
The implication is that the OP wants to use the referenced TRS jack as an audio connector, but that is not the only use for such a jack.  The manufacturer of the jack knows this, and provided only general pin connection information.

 

It is up to the user to assign a role to each pin on a given connector.  I inferred that the OP was seeking an audio-related answer.  Had I not known the answer, Google would have told me:

https://www.google.ca/search?q=stereo+headphone+ground+left+right&tbm=isch

 

How did I know what do search for? :

Quote:
I am working with a stereo head phone back but I cant figure what pin relates to what.I downloaded the data sheet but I still cant make out what is what. There is no labeling in the data sheet as to what is ground and what is left in or right in.
The OP told me!

 

If the tone of my initial replies seemed a little short, that's only because I'm a little tired of folks stopping by and asking questions for which an answer is readily available had they only spent 60 seconds with a search engine.  And the OP isn't a newcomer.  He's/she's been a member for nearly 7 years and has almost 200 posts.

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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Quote:
I am planning to solder wires from a mic to the pins and you are saying that if I dont insert a male jack the pins wont take in the signal from the mic? So I need to use male connector only to work with the female connector?
Where did I say that?

 

Be specific about what you are attempting to do.

 

The schematic you posted is for a female jack.  It is a PCB-mount device, i.e. it solders directly to a circuit board.

 

Generally, an external microphone would be wired up to a mail plug connector which fits to a female jack connector.  When the external connector is not inserted, the jack routes the audio signals to the other pins, allowing (for example) an internal microphone to be connected to the same circuit.  When you plug in the external mic, the internal mic is automatically disconnected.

 

Have a look again at the schematic you posted in your OP.

 

When the male plug is inserted, the sleeve makes contact with pin 5, the ring makes contact with pin 1, and the tip makes contact with pin 4.

 

Furthermore, the whole male connector pushes aside internal switch contacts on pins 1 and 4.  Without the male connector, those switch contacts connect pin 1 to pin 2, and pin 4 to pin 3.  This is how an internal device (speaker/mic) is 'overridden' by an external device.  In the case of speakers:

  1. the output of the left amplifier is connected to pin 4
  2. the output of the right amplifier is connected to pin 1
  3. the left internal speaker is connected to pin 3 (and ground)
  4. the right internal speaker is connected to pint 2 (and ground)

 

What kind of microphone do you have?  Is it in fact a stereo mic?  Is it an electret mic i.e. needs power?  The connection for such a mic is not the same as for stereo headphones.

 

If you give specific questions, you'll get better answers.

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

Last Edited: Sun. Jun 7, 2015 - 02:45 PM
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This is yet another test to see if a question with a simple answer that seems obvious to an engineer with thirty years of experience will receive a snippy snarky answer essentially calling the questioner inferior.

<removed> - Jim

 

Oh and at least Joey attempted to post a helpful reply. How did your comment help OP?

Last Edited: Mon. Jun 8, 2015 - 05:45 PM
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Another thing.In some of the head sets like the ones for mobile phones the mic comes along with two head phone inputs. So in that case which pin will be mic.I know what are left_in and right_in but what corresponds to mic?

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Is there even a "standard" for such things? Or if you buy a headset for a PS/4 (say) is there some suggestion it would also work in an Xbone? I don't think so. Each manufacturer is free to allocate the pins as they see fit. Indeed they might deliberately reorder things so as to avoid use of a competitors products. So exactly what headset are you talking about?

 

For example:

 

http://www.androidpolice.com/201...

 

http://www.androidpolice.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/nexusae0_CTIA_OMTP_Pinout_thumb.png

 

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I am speaking about the nokia headset marked in the picture posted as the second reply.

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https://www.google.co.uk/search?...

 

The consensus of which (counting from the tip inwards) is Left, Right, Mic, Gnd.

 

(you have heard of Google?)

 

EDIT: just a minute - looking back, the picture above even says this is the order for Nokia headset....

 

 

And from my other post we know this is known as "OMTP" so Google says... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pho...

 

Are you trolling?

Last Edited: Mon. Jun 8, 2015 - 09:40 AM
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I think you've chosen the wrong jack then - it only has three connections. You want one with four.

Last Edited: Mon. Jun 8, 2015 - 09:35 AM
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I am working with this. It is a codec shield, it connects to my earphones well but it doesnt with an earphone with mic on it.

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11290

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If you are using the Sparkfun codec shield the schematic shows you the connections for line in and headphones out:

David

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Yeah I have seen that schematic.I am just trying to connect a mic to that for both the left and right channels.

I am using the mic below:

 https://www.sparkfun.com/products/9868

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So how shall I hook these mics up to the codec shield?

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So you post a thread asking about a stereo headphone jack and you are actually trying to connect a mono microphone via a preamp which outputs a 200mv pk-pk signal with a half rail DC offset to, and I am making a big assumption here, Line inputs on a codec shield.

 

Can I suggest you clarify exactly what you are trying to do and provide a sketch or schematic of how you have wired your circuit.

 

David

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So how shall I hook these mics up to the codec shield?

Are you winding us up? What do you think these pins on the board are for?...