Speech recognition

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So I am again working on a device for the Deaf. Necessity being the mother of invention and all, I am sitting in the back seat of a 172 and interpreting for a Deaf student pilot - pro bono (CFII in the right seat, student in the left). We are thinking about a suction cup rear-view mirror to prevent him from turning around to see my signs.

 

I also thought a small LCD at the top of the instrument panel on his side with some pre-recorded instructions (Nose up, more power, nose down, etc) might be easy enough with a remote pushbutton controller used by the CFII. 

Then I wondered about a gumstix (or equivalent) pc and what may be available for speech recognition, something that I could get off the shelf. 

 

Then I wondered if there was a purpose built IC and stumbled across this link:

http://www.futurlec.com/News/Phi...

 

So text-to-speech is easy to find and my smartphone does a great job of voice-to-text, but I am not so sure it would work inside a 172 cockpit given the ambient noise level inside an un-pressurized single engine airplane.

 

I guess I am posting to see what other solutions may be available in regards to IC's? 

 

If I had the talent of some of you guys I would hack a pair of those "new tech" Sony captioning glasses being used in theaters and hook up some real-time ambient speech recognition! Maybe I should do a Gofundme page!! lol, Sony probably wouldn't be up for that;)

 

Thanks

john

 

 

 

 

Just some guy

Last Edited: Mon. Aug 24, 2015 - 12:42 AM
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johnrk wrote:
... I am sitting in the back seat of a 172 ...
Hope you're not big and tall wink

johnrk wrote:
Then I wondered about a gumstix (or equivalent) pc and what may be available for speech recognition, something that I could get off the shelf.
IIRC the open source CMU Sphinx speech recognition can run on a relatively fast ARM.

An alternative to a Gumstix is a Raspberry Pi Compute Module.

Atmel's SAMA5 is on some third party SoM and IIRC the newer versions of SAMA5 are for wrist watches; some SAMA5 have LCD controllers and all are miserly on power.

johnrk wrote:
,,, but I am not so sure it would work inside a 172 cockpit given the ambient noise level inside an un-pressurized single engine airplane.
A noise cancelling microphone might be adequate.


CMU Sphinx

A way to make the world accessible

http://cmusphinx.sourceforge.net/2014/11/a-way-to-make-the-world-accessible/

Gumstix Developer Center

http://www.gumstix.org/

Raspberry Pi

Compute Module

https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/compute-module/

raspberrypi [CMUSphinx Wiki]

http://cmusphinx.sourceforge.net/wiki/raspberrypi

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Mon. Aug 24, 2015 - 06:48 AM
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I would try with some mic.'s that cancel each other out.

If you place 2 mic's with 5 cm apart, the noise on both are close to the same (and in phase!), so the -sum should be zero, if you talk into only one mic. that should work. 

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Wow - thank you all for the information! Sorry I didn't come back sooner I am taking a Microsoft Certification class and my instructor is one of those, "Read 500 pages for tomorrow," type of guys. I have had my head in the MCTS book for a solid week. I spent all last weekend studying (wife is not happy). 

 

I will definitely check out the Raspberry Pi since I already have a few books on it. 

Hope you're not big and tall wink

 You know I spent all my time in two place trainers when I finished my PP license in 1986, but I was really surprised at how much room I had. I am one of those guys that is fine if I am PIC, but I do not make a good passenger lol. I do feel like we are floating around nose high all the time but this is just my perception from the back seat. I am 6'1" 230 pounds and when the instructor said, "We are doing minimum controllable airspeed, steep turns, approach-to-landing stalls, and takeoff-departure stalls today!" I replied, "Are we within CG with a fat guy in the back?" lol

 

Thanks again - I will follow up! I am intrigued by the noise cancelling recommendations also!

 

John

Just some guy

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johnrk wrote:
I will definitely check out the Raspberry Pi since I already have a few books on it.
Allied Electronics is the US distributor.

Caught my attention that Allied has added the Intel Edison; it's an alternative to the Raspberry Pi that adds WiFi plus Bluetooth 4 and is a SoM.

Intel Edison is not industrial temperature rated; likely not a problem because its power dissipation is low so temperature regulation should be simple.

Could use USB for all headsets s.t. the speech recognition is available to all operators in the aircraft's cabin.

For one operator might be easier to use a Bluetooth 4 headset.


Computers - Audio, Video, RF & Security

http://www.alliedelec.com/computers-peripherals/computers/

SparkFun Electronics

Loading Debian (Ubilinux) on the Edison

https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/loading-debian-ubilinux-on-the-edison

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller