Sound effects chips?

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All the ones I've been able to find references to seem to have been discontinued. Does anyone know of anything that's currently in production? Thanks.

Karl

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What sort of sound effects are you after?

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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Typical video game type sounds: guns, bombs, beeps, etc. Doesn't have to be hi-fi.

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Maybe you can use these kind of chips.

The BU8899GU is a 64-tone polyphonic sound source LSI capable of generating hi-fi sounds at audio CD quality for mobile phones. This LSI incorporates new features, such as user-customized sound function, reverb function, and simultaneous playing function for up to four songs. Furthermore, the LSI incorporates a single ADPCM encoder and two decoder channels, thus making melody mixing possible. The LSI provides an API that supports JAVA standards (MIDP2.0) for simultaneous four-channel parallel playback performance, supporting a variety of applications and games. This playback performance is implemented on the hardware, greatly mitigating the load on the CPU.

*Simultaneously generates up to 64 polyphonic tones out of a tone palette of 128 sounds, 47 drum-set sounds, 15 electric drum-set sounds, and 32 special effect sounds.
*Generates original tones from the user-customized sounds (up to 8 sounds).
*Supports pitch-bent and vibrato effects.
*Incorporates a 3-channel equalizer function, one of which is suitable for low-pitched sound and the other two channels are suitable for mid- and high-pitched sounds.
*Incorporates a 3D sound (reverb) function.

http://www.rohm.com/products/dat...

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Thanks. That possibly could work, though it's overkill. Also looks like it would be hard to hand-solder (mine is a one-off application). There used to be chips that did exactly the sort of thing I'm looking for (made by TI and Holtek, among others). Maybe audio expectations have become so sophisticated there just aren't any simple solutions anymore.

Karl

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You could always make your own. Pick an AVR with a couple of PWM channels. Make a few sine tables, use a pseudo random generator for noise..., or if you just want ONE, then II'll have a look round, I might have an old GI chip floating about (AY-3-8910, AY-3-8912 or AY-3-8913).

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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Probably another suggestion that’s not quite right:

http://www.speechchips.com/shop/...

Looks to do voices and sounds. Expensive too.
FWIW, I think the guy that runs the company occasionally post here.

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I think the really early games did their own sound in software. Even if you don't have enough PWM pins, if you have enough cycles (or dedicate a cheap avr to the problem) you could create the basic sound effects. Just use a cheap piezo buzzer and turn it on and off at different rates, controlled by your own loop.

I know beyond logic website had something about using a uC to make simple sounds, maybe check then out

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The REALLY early video games didn't have any software, as they were entirely built from 7400 series or equivalent logic chips, the sounds were mainly video timing signals and noise circuits.
The first microprocessor video games used a very simple pre-loadable counter circuit to generate a programmable square wave.
Then there were games like Pacman, which had a dedicated hardware state machine, and a whole raft of games using the aforementioned AY-3-891x chips.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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John_A_Brown wrote:
The REALLY early video games didn't have any software, as they were entirely built from 7400 series or equivalent logic chips, the sounds were mainly video timing signals and noise circuits.

Humm wonder where I could get the circuit for one of these, is it just me or does this scream out "cpld re-implementation !" :)

Quote:

The first microprocessor video games used a very simple pre-loadable counter circuit to generate a programmable square wave.
Then there were games like Pacman, which had a dedicated hardware state machine, and a whole raft of games using the aforementioned AY-3-891x chips.

If you look around you can still get hold of the AY--3-891x chips either as pulls or as old stock (I bought a few last year, to repair an old home computer)., no good if you want to manufacture something new, but ok for a one off I suppose. One of the advantages of this chip is that the 8910 and 8912 also had 2 and 1 io ports respectivly, so you effectivlely would only loose a couple of lines of io that the AY uses for handshaking.

Phill.

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John_A_Brown wrote:
The REALLY early video games didn't have any software, as they were entirely built from 7400 series or equivalent logic chips, the sounds were mainly video timing signals and noise circuits.
The first microprocessor video games used a very simple pre-loadable counter circuit to generate a programmable square wave.
Then there were games like Pacman, which had a dedicated hardware state machine, and a whole raft of games using the aforementioned AY-3-891x chips.

lol, yeah I forgot there are people older than me :)

I was thinking about the Atari2600 as a "really old" game. Not those that pre-dated it.

If you want to play little annoying tunes that you can download from the internet for old mobile phones, then look at the PICAXE 08M chip (picaxe.co.uk). Yes it is a basic-stamp like chip. No it doesn't cost anywhere as much as the Basic Stamp (about US $3 I think).

I've used it to play simple monophonic (is that a real word?) ringtones. You can download free software to covert the nokia format into Basic.

oh yeah, I highly recommend using old C64 tunes as they were created for limited hardware (no, I'm not saying the SID chip is as limited as an 08M, on the contrary........) and still sound something like their original when played back through the 08M and a piezo buzzer.

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Quote:
Humm wonder where I could get the circuit for one of these, is it just me or does this scream out "cpld re-implementation !" Smile

I threw all mine away about four years ago, I used to have a filing cabinet full of old video game manuals in the garage, but you can't keep everything (and they were damp and smelly).

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.