SOLVED - Atmega8 and Atmel Start

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#1
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Hi,

I want to start a new project using Atmel Start with an Atmega8 but I didn't find it in the list.

I use this link: https://start.atmel.com/#project

I found Atmega328, Atmega88 but nothing about Atmega8.

Is it a bug or is it not possible anymore ?

 

Thanks ;)

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Last Edited: Mon. Jan 7, 2019 - 03:32 PM
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There's very little for Tiny/Mega in Start. It's really intended for the complex chips like Xmega, UC3, ARM, etc

 

Also the ATmega8 is an ancient dinosaur. It dates from almost the turn of the millenium while at least mega48/88/168 date from about 2005-2006 and the 328 not much longer after that. So they are more "modern" and more likely to be supported in recent library code (the 48/88/168/328 series in particular attracts attention because the 328 is still the main "Arduino processor")

 

Given that the mega88 is effectively a "super set" of the mega8 I wonder why in 2019 anyone would choose to work with the mega8 anyway?

 

(actually in 2019 it seems that the thrust of Microchip's development (at the lower end) is actually tinyX chips so if you were just starting out you might want to consider those - more "bang for buck" and almost bound to be supported by ASF/Start/etc)

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Thanks clawson for those information ;)

 

For now I'm good with Atmega328 but Atmega8 are cheaper than Atmega328 (price/2 on AliExpress), that's why I was looking for them.

 

I will stick to Atmega328 and Atmega644 then :/

 

Attiny are good but I need more than 2/4 IOs ;)

 

Samy

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As I say the best "bang for buck" that Atmel/Microchip seem to be delivering these days are the relatively newly released AVR-0 and AVR-1 series chips sometimes called tinyX or Xtiny. They are like cut down Xmegas and tend to deliver a lot of resources for not many $0.01's ! The only downside of them seem to be:

 

1) forget anything you already know about traditional tiny/mega. While they have names like tiny412 that might lead you to believe they are like the original tiny/mega chips they are far more like Xmegas which means a whole load of new peripheral functionality (and bit/register names) to learn about

 

2) Not all programmers can handle them - so probably get a board with an onboard programmer/debugger if you don't already have an all signing device like an Atmel-ICE

 

3) because they are new there might (a) be some silicon issues to be ironed out and (b) not a lot of existing library/example code - but "Atmel Start" could be a good place to get some.

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clawson wrote:

The only downside of them seem to be:

 

You forgot...

 

4) They ain't available in DIP packages.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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Brian Fairchild wrote:
4) They ain't available in DIP packages.

https://www.futurlec.com/SMD_Ada...

 

:-) :-) ;-)