Simple Embedded 802.11?

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Apologies if this has already been covered. I did search the forums but failed hopelessly. :)

Do any of you guys know of any very simple 802.11 interface device, ideally something of the complexity (to use) as an FTDI USB device?

No need for high data throughput, so 802.11b is fine, but it does need to be 802.11 as we need to talk to PCs.

Thanks in advance.

Andy G

If we are not supposed to eat animals, why are they made out of meat?

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I don't think that functionality exists in one simple to use chip :(

You'll be talking complete modules, like this one.

The ICs on such modules are very likely not available to normal users, unless you buy a few million at a time :(

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This one is a nice solution

http://www.arrownac.com/manufact...

And if you are lucky they'll ship a free sample

https://www.avrfreaks.net/index.p...

/Bingo

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Thanks folks, much appreciated.

:D

If we are not supposed to eat animals, why are they made out of meat?

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Bingo600 wrote:
This one is a nice solution

http://www.arrownac.com/manufact...

And if you are lucky they'll ship a free sample

/Bingo

I tried my luck... Never got it, though :(

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I got the free sample. It is pretty simple to use, though I was frustrated that they never really explained how it works!!!! I'll describe it to others so that they hopefully don't share my same frustration. What the MatchPort does is take a UART (there are 2) and either assign it to a port on the MatchPort's IP or connects to a port on a remote IP. If you assign the UART to a port on the MatchPort, a PC can connect to it using TCP or UDP and simply send and receive from it using a socket. If you configure the MatchPort to connect to a remote IP, it will try to connect to that remote IP/port (that the PC must be listening and accepting connections on) and then RX/TX to it using TCP or UDP sockets.

The MatchPort has a simple webserver used to configure the device (that can also be done over telnet or the UART) and also serve up static pages.With some of the other Lantronix modules you can apparently have code run on the webserver that lets the webserver interact with the device itself (I'm guessing through Java applets or something). The power usage is pretty crazy though, up to 350mA when TXing, IIRC. Also, it runs on 3.3V so you might need a transceiver if interfacing it to a higher voltage AVR. To play around with it I simply hooked it up to my PC's RS232 port using a Maxim transceiver. I'm planning on making a wireless (minus power) scrolling LED dot matrix display that a PC can connect to and send RSS feeds, stock prices, etc. :D

Math is cool.
jevinskie.com

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Malmkvist wrote:
Bingo600 wrote:
This one is a nice solution

http://www.arrownac.com/manufact...

And if you are lucky they'll ship a free sample

/Bingo

I tried my luck... Never got it, though :(

Ditto.

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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@ anyone who has used the matchport -

What is the situation with SSH? What functionality does the matchport provide, and what has to be controlled?

I am looking at developing a wireless SSH shell, and if the matchport would deal with all the protocol overheads, it would save me considerable amounts of trouble.

It says it is supported as client and server, but I could not really find out whether this meant just for device configuration etc.