Servo motor datasheet

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I need a full datasheet of micro servo which goes from 0 to 180

how to drive it in details so i can use it with 8051 Micro controller

 

 

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Would you like fries with that?

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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I typed your specs into google. Got this:
http://www.ee.ic.ac.uk/pcheung/teaching/DE1_EE/stores/sg90_datasheet.pdf

Why, pray tell, would you ask a question that is arguably common knowlege or easily found?
The servo neither knows or cares what processor is connected to it. In its normal application, it is unlikely to even be driven by a processor.

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Kartman wrote:

The servo neither knows or cares what processor is connected to it.

 

You could probably do a decent job with

a 556, a few resistors, capacitors and a

potentiometer.

 

--Mike

 

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From PaulVDH in another thread meant for this one:

 

I have never seen an detailed datasheet of such RC servo's.

(There are also complete other sort of motors which are called "servo motors", those are usually BLDC or PMSM (Which is the same).

 

The RC servo's need a pulse between 1ms and 2ms, which present the positon, but it usually not very accurate, and nor very repeatable between different units.

These things are usually made for the hobby market, and not for professional uses, and the documentation reflects that.

 

Only way I can merge the post LOL

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

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Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

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js wrote:

Would you like fries with that?

 

I have reported this post.

 

Based on the Code of Conduct of Atmel forum:

 

" Comments, actions, or displays which are meant to demean, harass or insult others will not be tolerated. "

 

I believe this goes against the Atmel community code of conduct.

 

 

Regards,

Moe

Last Edited: Mon. Apr 15, 2019 - 01:01 PM
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Moe,

 

If you do a search of the OP you will know that the OP is peppering the site with questions about a competitors product and essentially asking us to do their homework.  Several locked threads as well.

 

Johns comment is essentially asking if the OP wants us to do the whole job as well as the OP's research.

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

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Jim,

 

You have to look at everycase seperatly, The Moderator could easily give an answer like what others did, I know what the OP is doing in the forum but at this specific situation this has nothing to do with a competitor. I reported it, its up to you wether you take an action or not.

 

Thanks & Best regards,

Moe

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I also fear you may have missed the point that John is a moderator!

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I know it Cliff, thats why he should be the first not to break the Atmels' Code of Conduct...

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Not sure if it says it officially in the "code of conduct" but the point is that the moderators here can do what they please - we run the show! ;-)

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LOL. Donno if I have to report this also or not ;-)

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Personally, I enjoy the moderators sense of humor and the fact they are not so hard line, it's one of the things I find appealing about this site!

Jim

 

Click Link: Get Free Stock: Retire early! PM for strategy

share.robinhood.com/jamesc3274

 

 

 

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You could probably do a decent job with

a 556, a few resistors, capacitors and a

potentiometer.

Accepting my own challenge, I built this circuit with 3 resistors, a dozen capacitors, and a potentiometer:

 

556 Servo Controller Circuit

 

The servo tracks the position of the potentiometer pretty well.

Here's a picture of the servo pulse at the midpoint:

 

556 Servo Signal at Midpoint

 

It was nice to actually build something today!

 

--Mike

 

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Well,  the first thing that I did was take the string "full datasheet of micro servo which goes from 0 to 180" and paste it into the URL line of the browser that you're looking at now.

 

Then I opened the PDF file of the first device that appeared when Google completed its search.   Then I read the silly sucker, or, most (some) of it. 

 

  I simply ignored the line that mentioned "8051 microcontroller" for the simple reason that anyone in their right mind who managed to find  *AVR FREAKS dot net" probably has an antipathy towards anything having to do with the Intel 8051.  Which is the CPU that many people here used before they came to realize how much easier it was to do anything worth doing with an AVR instead of an 8051 (or for that matter, a 6800, a 6502, a 68HC11, a 8041, a 8080, or especially an 8086 (which continues to infest our PCs).    I exclude the PICs because the PIC makers are the gracious hosts of this website.

 

Which brings up the question of why are you using the 8051 to drive the servo?  Anyone of the lonesome losers listed above could do the job.  Basically, you are taking a square-wave at a specific frequency and changing its duty-cycle.  There is (hopefully) a linear relationship between the duty-cycle and the position of the servo arm.