Server downtime!

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AVRfreaks.net will be down due to maintainance, all weekend from friday 11/1 12:00 until late sunday evening.

Best regards;
The AVRfreaks.net team

*** Eivind, webmaster ***

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My man, if you don't mind me saying, posting this message an hour before the blackout isn't that helpful.

I don't know if the server was really down or not, but it wasn't on my DNS server. Meaning if I still write the ip:

80.232.32.135

Instead www.avrfreaks.net it worked fine.

I think people should write this address down for future reference, and next time you can put an announcement or something of what's going on.

Those were really tough three days.. :(

Without the journey the reward in the end is half as sweet..
I am a newbie.
Call me Zohar.

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There was a message prior to the one above from eivind in "avrfreaks.net" forum - I guess he cross posted here as a last minute after thought on the basis that not everyone reads all the fora.

(but even the one in that forum has called for more advanced notice in future for such a major outage)

EDIT: link:

https://www.avrfreaks.net/index.p...

Actually that was posted about the same time as this thread - which was actually several hours before it went off air as I was accessing it at the time and read that just a few minutes after it was posted. I was then able to access it several hours later (after a meeting with my Atmel rep and FAE about XMegas in fact) just before it went off.

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Idon't see myself as an expert on neither DNS not web servers in general or Apache in particular (assuming that is the heart of the site) but I thought it would be fairly simple to replace the whole server-shebang with a simple HTML page going something like "We are down for maintenance. Hopefully back up late sunday evening". In the event that the server hardware was maintained (and thus the server not runing at all), wouldn't it be fairly easy to just point the DNS record (too lazy to look up the proper name in the Albitz/Liu book - is it "IN"?) to some server that serves that simple page. Any old 66 MHz P4 should be able to do that. (-:

This would be very handy for those that misses the announcement, perhaps because thay where not visiting during the time it was present?

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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JohanEkdahl wrote:
Idon't see myself as an expert on neither DNS not web servers in general or Apache in particular (assuming that is the heart of the site) but I thought it would be fairly simple to replace the whole server-shebang with a simple HTML page going something like "We are down for maintenance. Hopefully back up late sunday evening". In the event that the server hardware was maintained (and thus the server not runing at all), wouldn't it be fairly easy to just point the DNS record (too lazy to look up the proper name in the Albitz/Liu book - is it "IN"?) to some server that serves that simple page. Any old 66 MHz P4 should be able to do that. (-:

This would be very handy for those that misses the announcement, perhaps because thay where not visiting during the time it was present?

I could be wrong here but changing the DNS may only prolong the downtime due to DNS propagation. In a perfect world this would work but unfortunately a lot of servers cache dns entries way too long.

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uidzer0 wrote:
JohanEkdahl wrote:
Idon't see myself as an expert on neither DNS not web servers in general or Apache in particular (assuming that is the heart of the site) but I thought it would be fairly simple to replace the whole server-shebang with a simple HTML page going something like "We are down for maintenance. Hopefully back up late sunday evening". In the event that the server hardware was maintained (and thus the server not runing at all), wouldn't it be fairly easy to just point the DNS record (too lazy to look up the proper name in the Albitz/Liu book - is it "IN"?) to some server that serves that simple page. Any old 66 MHz P4 should be able to do that. (-:

This would be very handy for those that misses the announcement, perhaps because thay where not visiting during the time it was present?

I could be wrong here but changing the DNS may only prolong the downtime due to DNS propagation. In a perfect world this would work but unfortunately a lot of servers cache dns entries way too long.

They will cache as for up to as long as you set the expiry time. However this requires that you preemptively set the DNS entry lifespan time to a much shorter period early enough so that any cached entries get flushed before you make the IP change.

Setting up a notification server works, as long as the connection to the ISP is not disrupted by the maintenance as well.

Writing code is like having sex.... make one little mistake, and you're supporting it for life.

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glitch wrote:

They will cache as for up to as long as you set the expiry time. However this requires that you preemptively set the DNS entry lifespan time to a much shorter period early enough so that any cached entries get flushed before you make the IP change.

Setting up a notification server works, as long as the connection to the ISP is not disrupted by the maintenance as well.

Ah ok, I wasn't sure if BIND/whatever was forced to comply with the defined TTL.

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uidzer0 wrote:
Ah ok, I wasn't sure if BIND/whatever was forced to comply with the defined TTL.

Well a properly written caching system would obey the numbers. It's certainly possible to ignore them, but then your cache is unreliable, pretty much defeating the purpose. (Also note that if "misbehaving" cache servers were wide spread, services like dynDNS would be completely useless)

The way we manage it, is to drop the TTL down to about 5 min a few days before an anticipated major change (our TTL is usually 24hrs, so we double it for safety). Make the change, and then restore the TTL to a more sane value. In the case of a temporary server, the TTL would remain at 5 min until the DNS pointer is restored to the proper value.

Writing code is like having sex.... make one little mistake, and you're supporting it for life.