SD Card Sockets

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#1
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Has anyone come across any SD card sockets which are a bit different to the norm?

I've got a control card which is mounted vertically behind a front panel; it holds a COG LCD display, some switches plus an M1284P (probably). I want to give the unit SD card capability but all the sockets I can find are essentially right-angled meaning I'd need another carrier PCB for the socket long with mounting hardware and interconnections to my board.

What I really want is a socket which 'hangs' off the back of the board (see sketch).

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#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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I just ordered a couple the other day ( http://www.ebay.com/itm/18095167... ), I do not have much experience with them, but looking @ what you want to do and looking @ the SD sockets I got, it would seem fairly easy to replace the straight dual row header with a right angle dual row header. If you did this and mounted the SD socket "between" the front panel and the PCB I think you would achieve what you want (though the PCB would need to be "further back" from the front panel, don't know if that would be a problem...)

Fish

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Brian, i can't say i've seen such a beast. I think you'll just have to do a little pcb. Carefully designed, you could have it slot into your main pcb and have large pads on both boards to both attach and connect the signals. You'll be able to position the connctor so that you get the right amount of poke through for the card.

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@Fish4Fun

Thanks, unfortunately the PCB has to be quite close to the front panel as it's got an LCD display and push-buttons mounted on it.

@Kartman

Thanks, I had feared I'd need to put another PCB in there. I quite like your idea for connecting them together.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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With a little bending you can solder the long pins of a 100 mil male header to an micro-SD-to-SD adapter, then solder the short pins to the board. With all the solder joints it makes a suprisingly rugged socket.