RF dBm and distance

Go To Last Post
6 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I have receiver module (Nordic semiconductor nRF24L01), input sensitivity is -82 dBm, max distance is about 80 m, if I change module to nRF24L01+PA+LNA, which input sensitivity is -92 dBm, what will be expected max distance. Transmitter and antennas are same.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

The increased sensitivity will give you about a 3x increase in distance. However, if the transmitter also has a PA, it will give an additional increase in distance.

- S

ps: you can do all the calculations yourself using the friis equation.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Ok.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Atmel app: Range Calculation for 300 MHz to 1000 MHz Communication Systems.

There is a spreadsheet to estimate the range.

Regards,

Bruno Muswieck

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Due to the inverse square law in propagation loss, and the variability of path loss vs. Fresnel zone clearance, path obstructions from natural and man-made objects, multipath power combining, and many other issues, signal strength is a very poor indicator of distance.

Double the distance, halve the power. In a perfectly line of sight condition.

range estimates in RF systems are done in the time domain, such as "radar" and time difference of arrival systems.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Quote:

Due to the inverse square law in propagation loss, and the variability of path loss vs. Fresnel zone clearance, path obstructions from natural and man-made objects, multipath power combining, and many other issues, signal strength is a very poor indicator of distance.

Isn't that poor Stevech for open field.

Quote:
range estimates in RF systems are done in the time domain, such as "radar" and time difference of arrival systems.

TDoA is done on time domain?

Regards,

Bruno Muswieck