Resistor values 10E and 0E. What does that mean?

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Hi,

 

I am reading a schematic that lists two resistors of values 10E and 0E.  Googled a bit.  Does this mean 10ohm and 0ohm, respectively?

 

Thanks.

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10E= 10 Ohm (Ω)

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grohote wrote:

10E= 10 Ohm (Ω)

 

Thanks! So, the 0E is basically 0ohm.  Below is the original schematic, R4 and R4 in question.  So, why would one put a 0ohm resistor there?  What's the point of having the 10ohm?  Why not just connect the wires without the resistors?

 

 

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Note that you can put the picture in the post - so we can see it:

 

 

unebonnevie wrote:
why would one put a 0ohm resistor there?

It's just a link.

 

What's the point

might just be convenient for the PCB design - to jump over a track;

 

might for some case where you don't want that connection;

 

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A strange schematic fragment.   There are some connecting dots next to obvious connections that have no dots.

And two different ground signs.  I guess that a user might want to separate Vcc from PVD by removing the zero ohms resistor.

 This appears to be some connector to an audio device.  Hence the option of splitting grounds for ground loop hum control.

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unebonnevie wrote:
What's the point of having the 10ohm?  Why not just connect the wires without the resistors?

 

For a good reason, invented in board era. Such resistor is rather small and is used as a fuse. If anything wrong happen to the connected board, the resistor will go puff and protect main supply.

And yes, the second task is to do filtering (together with a cap) so that pulse or noise from either side can not pass-through.

Last Edited: Wed. Dec 22, 2021 - 09:51 PM
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Good reasons for zero-ohm resistors but I think grohote missed them. Not much good as a fuse, really. And nearly zero effect at filtering (except, just maybe, microwave frequencies).

 

Instead, they have two big uses in these "modern" days, as suggested above:

 

1. Jumper, over a trace, for single-sided SMT boards. One, or a few, zero-ohm resistors can be a lot less expensive than going to double-side board!

 

2. Manufacture-time programmable circuit configuration. For example, I have a board that can be assembled two ways. In one way, I want one circuit to be used, the other way, I don't want that circuit to be used. So, I use a zero-ohm to connect, or not connect, that part of the circuit depending on which build is being done. This is a common use.

 

NB : there ARE resistor-size SMT fuses. They should not be confused with zero-ohm resistors. They are sized according to their fusing current, not resistance. I find this "E" terminology quite puzzling because we have long had "R" for resistance less than 1K, as in 10R or 2R7. It seems very odd that there is a second, possibly same meaning, designator! Is there any chance these really are fuses and the "E" indicates the fuse current?

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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A habit to use 10R for a fuse is from pre-smd times when the size of resistors was 10mm, diameter 3-5mm. A 'fuse' was smaller.

Mind, the quality of resistors was different because they were carbon types, not metal one, and small size is more prone to smoke out on extra current.

On quality TV or VCR board, each IC was powered through such small resistor.

Zero ohm was different- a simple wire, on single sided board, of course.

 

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(except, just maybe, microwave frequencies).

For a quick eval, one can ignore the 1 uF in parallel with the 100 uF.

Ignore the input impedance of SIP5.

That gives one a simple LPF with an Fc of 159 Hz.

 

I think, therefore, that being part of a filter is certainly possible.

 

With grohote, I too was thinking a small R, for example 10 ohms, is sometimes used as a fuse.

It has little impact upon the supply voltage at low currents, but goes puff in a (very small) cloud of smoke very easily.

It is also cheap, and easy to mount.

 

Why show the 0 ohm resistor?

Because, based upon the layout, when used as an easily placed jumper over another PCB trace, it IS a part that has to be stocked, placed, and accounted for, from a manufacturing perspective.

We all agree it makes no difference electrically.

 

Without more info on the circuit the next comment is purely speculative. 

Given the Vcc and the PVD labels, one might also consider the possibility of Vcc powering up quickly, to power SIP5, so that one doesn't have voltage on signal lines prior to having voltage on the V+ pins.

Then, shortly thereafter, the SIP5 is actually powered by the PVD line, which is possibly much cleaner, but has a lag in its power up.

The 10 ohm link lets this happen without directly tying the two power sources together.

 

JC

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Maybe the next round will fix things up.

Is C5 supposed to be in parallel with C6????  60% no, 40% perhaps.  Not really a clear drawing.  

C5 might simply be a chassis gnd connection to PVD, in old-school style.

 

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Such resistor is rather small and is used as a fuse.

"Olfactory Over-current Indicator"   :-)  (at least, back in the TH resistor days.)

 

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ka7ehk wrote:

Good reasons for zero-ohm resistors but I think grohote missed them. Not much good as a fuse, really. And nearly zero effect at filtering (except, just maybe, microwave frequencies).

In

Jim

I think you missed what grohote  wrote….

 

the filtering was referenced to the 10 ohm and 100uF cap combo as a low pass filter.

 

Right Side Jim

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unebonnevie wrote:
I am reading a schematic that lists two resistors of values 10E and 0E.  Googled a bit.  Does this mean 10ohm and 0ohm, respectively?
 It SMD resistors 
unebonnevie wrote:

So, why would one put a 0ohm resistor there?  What's the point of having the 10ohm?  Why not just connect the wires without the resistors?

one Is Earth and one Is Ground,It always look at consumer electronics.Compare to electronic kit that value and schematic didn’t appeared.

www.tokopedia.com/madagang .Buy and Donated cheap electronics and manuscripts.

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DocJC wrote:
goes puff in a (very small) cloud of smoke very easily

 

/One of scenarios/

Typically a small black dot (1mm diam.) with traces of explosion as some rays around. Not a smell, nothing spectacular, yet efficient.

 

All round-shaped resistors are spiralized, so the over-current will find a minute weak point on the body, somewhere.

Well, I do not know how a smd will do it, whether 0603 or 0805 is usable.

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I guess in that figure, 10E means 10 x Electric Field Intensity, right?!?

 

Dimension is J/m.  devil

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HKPhysicist wrote:
Electric Field Intensity, right?

 

Wrong. We are trying to understand what an electron is (he will blow the fuse for good) but, we do not know what the Field is.

Nobody know. A kind of bundle of something, or permanent nothing of something- because there can be no mass included.

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grohote wrote:

HKPhysicist wrote:
Electric Field Intensity, right?

 

Wrong. We are trying to understand what an electron is (he will blow the fuse for good) but, we do not know what the Field is.

Nobody know. A kind of bundle of something, or permanent nothing of something- because there can be no mass included.

 

you really need to not take everything  written here so seriously smiley

 

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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Far from that, I am only happy to get a Field theme...

It may look seriously, but in fact, a Field is very funny stuff- still we do not know what it is.

Not even after years of a college studies, remains elusive.

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HKPhysicist wrote:
I guess in that figure, 10E means 10 x Electric Field Intensity, right?!?
The OP didn’t mention resistors dimension(a.k.a Watt)

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grohote wrote:

Far from that, I am only happy to get a Field theme...

It may look seriously, but in fact, a Field is very funny stuff- still we do not know what it is.

Not even after years of a college studies, remains elusive.

 

Okay, then.

 

If you determine to understand what Field is, you have to dive into advanced theoretical physics - Quantum Field Theory.

 

They will tell you that every type of field represents an interaction (Force) between matters; and every type of interaction uniquely corresponding to a type of Quanta called Boson.  winkcool

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HKPhysicist wrote:
Force

 

That is where all kind of difficulties starts- the word is well spoken, yet nobody know what the Force is- including gravitational as the first.

Some indication are there, relation between them. They fit our formulas well, only we do not know the very reasons behind, or, we do not know yet.