Recommend oscilloscope with/and Logic analyzer

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Hi,
I am student/hobbyist and I would like to buy digital oscilloscope and Logic analyzer for my AVR and ARM projects. It is not cheap equipment, so I would like your advice on this.

What I need?:

    LA: Analyze protocols like I2C, SPI, RS232, "parallel bus" up to at least 20 MHz.
    Verify correct timing for this speed.
    Preferably 16 inputs, but I can live with only 8.

    Oscilloscope:
    Digital (cursors, measures, pause, USB, etc)
    At least 2 channels
    Watch square signal at 20MHz (So targeting 100Mhz oscilloscopes?)

I heard that Rigol is "best" between "Chinese" low cost oscilloscopes manufacturers (I don't have money for Agilent or Tektronics)
So my first choice was DS1102D (build in LA), but after watching this youtube review it seems that LA is not as good as it should be. (AFAIK No protocol analyzer :()

So I decided to buy LA and oscilloscope separately. I found Logic Sniffer from Dangerous Prototypes which seems to be really good and cheap (only $50)

Next thing is the oscilloscope:
I thought about same model (ds1102e), but without LA which is significantly cheaper.
But some people having troubles with it so I really don't know. Anybody have it? How long do you have it? How often you use it and do you have any problems with it?
Some short videos of defects:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHwCptWcFDo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lV3WKqZhuRQ&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBFgqSKYJMk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-J6S2ylj0g&feature=related

Next option is to buy some cheap USB oscilloscope like DSO-2250. But I do not know if it is ideal solution. I am afraid of responsiveness over USB, build quality and of course physical knobs are better than virtual.

So what do you think?
Thanks for every comment or response.

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There are about 60 threads with the word Rigol. Use the search function.

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We've also been over logic analyzers many times here, so a search for that should also give plenty.

Several users here, including me, have invested in the Salae Logic analyzer. Overall it is of excellent quality IMO - but will cost you €130/€250 for the 8/16 channel variants.

I do find the trigger functionality "weak", and (while a problem) I am not so enthusiastic about graphically over-designed UIs. The LogicSniffer software looks better in this respect - white background and a few !"straignt" colors for text, axes and waveforms.

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InHuMan wrote:
... (I don't have money for Agilent or Tektronics)
Tektronix is having a sale for the EMEA market (Europe, Middle East, Africa):
Limited-Time Offer – Price Reductions on MSO2000 and DPO2000 Series Oscilloscopes - Europe, Middle East, Africa (ends after 2012-Dec-31).
Tektronix has released a new low-price series:
New Tektronix oscilloscope series features 70MHz Models, full serial bus decode, advanced triggering (embedded.com, 2012-Oct-17).
Tektronix - 25% off for schools in the EMEA market:
Special offers for education – Europe, Middle East, Africa (ends after 2012-Dec-28 ).

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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InHuMan wrote:
Next option is to buy some cheap USB oscilloscope ...
PicoScope looks good.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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InHuMan wrote:
Watch square signal at 20MHz (So targeting 100Mhz oscilloscopes?)
Approximately.
An AVR XMEGA pad rise-time is 4ns; so a 80MHz bandwidth.
An AVR32 UC3 pad rise-time is 2ns but 1ns is possible (200MHz to 350MHz bandwidth approx.).
Bandwidth - must be the scope AND probe.
Consider the probe's load on the signal's driver; probe's capacitance will likely be significant.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Rigol is a good choice for a scope. For LA get a saela PC based LA, there are saela clones floating around for dirt cheap, get the real one if you can afford it.

For a LA I am convinced that the easy scolling/panning/zooming with a mouse and the large screen realestate of a monitor is the best way for LA.

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I've used this one for many years: http://www.pctestinstruments.com/ . Honestly I'm a little surprised it hasn't been updated much, but I guess if you've got a good thing going...

It's a little more expensive but you get tons of channels & a lot of decoders, combined with very high speeds.