Real-world AVR examples?

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It seems like most of the people on this forum are students using AVRs in school, hobbyists (like me) who like to tinker with stuff, or R&D types who use AVRs to control one-off measurement and data collection circuits. Are there any examples of consumer products that use AVR microcontrollers, and if so, what purpose do those AVR microcontrollers serve in the product?

I know that the design of most products can't be discussed due to NDAs, but surely there must be a few examples of products that use AVRs and that can be discussed openly. I've seen the claim that AVR microcontrollers are used "in Chrysler and BMW vehicles" but I was hoping for some examples that are a little more specific.

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microcontrollerguy wrote:
I know that the design of most products can't be discussed due to NDAs, but surely there must be a few examples of products that use AVRs and that can be discussed openly. I've seen the claim that AVR microcontrollers are used "in Chrysler and BMW vehicles" but I was hoping for some examples that are a little more specific.

I won't name my employer or product, but suffice to say it's machine automation.

Our main board consists of a PowerPC main processor, with two avrs. One of them is for power management (glorified GPIO expander) and interface such as buttons. The other takes synchonised measurements from a couple of different sensors, performs sanity checks, does some very basic initial signal processing and sends them off to the main processor.

There are plenty of examples of real products on this board. - there's another thread somewhere where this is discussed. Whilst we only have volume somewhere in the 1000's, clawson has AVRs in very significant production quantities.

-- Damien

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microcontrollerguy wrote:
It seems like most of the people on this forum are students using AVRs in school, hobbyists (like me) who like to tinker with stuff, or R&D types who use AVRs to control one-off measurement and data collection circuits.

And don't forget the very small designer/producers like John Samperi, Bob Gardner ... and me who are in 1, 2, 3 or 4 person companies. There are lots of us here.

microcontrollerguy wrote:
Are there any examples of consumer products that use AVR microcontrollers, and if so, what purpose do those AVR microcontrollers serve in the product?

Well maybe some of us would like to be involved with consumer products (as in millions per annum), but personally I like the variety of doing relatively short runs to solve "problems" for niche clients.

microcontrollerguy wrote:
I know that the design of most products can't be discussed due to NDAs, but surely there must be a few examples of products that use AVRs and that can be discussed openly. I've seen the claim that AVR microcontrollers are used "in Chrysler and BMW vehicles" but I was hoping for some examples that are a little more specific.
I can discuss my "products" that don't have NDAs. I have done 3 projects for Intel Malaysia, two of which used AVR chips. One is used to evaluate the efficacy of esd wrist straps for the thousands of their staff before they enter the factory floor and pass the results and their ID barcode details to management. Another controlled particular access doors.

Have also built 8 ticket machines for the Canadian government for use in their social welfare department. These are being evaluated at the moment. Much larger numbers may eventuate. The AVR handled the human activated ticket request switch, allocation of the next number, time and date tagging and formatted interface to an Epson thermal printer. The ticket gets attached to the interview report. It also had a display and buttons for setting the time and date and resetting the ticket number to one.

Have also done a prototype for a coffee machine allowing the customer to "design" their own particular flavour/strength mix.

All simple little projects for which there wasn't an off the shelf product for the clients.

Others I am certain will have "sexier" examples.

Cheers,

Ross

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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I know a friend who started with AVR-based temperature controllers and eventually expanded that into a business that grosses into the hundreds of millions of dollars in sales - selling essentially huge heating ovens.

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But you can go the other way.
Atmel R&D 'ed the Tiny28 for a big customer!

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I used an 8515 when I was working on the prototype Irisys thermal imager:

http://www.irisys.co.uk/thermal-imaging/introduction.aspx

The first production version used an 8515 as well, but subsequent versions have used ARMs.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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I have a 8515 in this.
http://www.seacomcorp.com/marine/documents/SEA857_11-09.pdf
It does everything!

multiplexed LCD driver (bit bang 3*4094)
sounds (SPI DAC's)
.
.
.
.

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Quote:

some examples

There are lists in prior discussions on the same topic. Search them out.

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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sparrow2 wrote:
I have a 8515 in this.
http://www.seacomcorp.com/marine/documents/SEA857_11-09.pdf
It does everything!

multiplexed LCD driver (bit bang 3*4094)
sounds (SPI DAC's).

Interesting. 60 watts at 10% distortion ... does that mean the "help" ended up sounding like "yelp" so the front panel label got changed? :lol:

(apologies from a "landlubber" with very limited history on ocean going container vessels)

Ross

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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The USB charger by Sanyo for their Eneloop NiMhs contains a tiny461.

https://www.avrfreaks.net/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=viewtopic&t=59445

This certainly a is high-volume consumer product.

Markus

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The front panel in this:

http://www.amstrad.com/products/...

uses a mega16. We've made about a million of those. (And another 2-3 million of similar designs - some of which used a mega8 in fact)

But like Lee says, this topic comes up aboout once a year, search out the prior threads, all this thread could really add are designs since the last such thread.

Moderator.

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pro-vent.pl/produkty,0.html
http://www.pro-vent.pl/sterowniki,0.html
- unfortunately only in polish.
All controllers for ventilation and air conditioning systems and almost all manipulators (except RC2, RM1 & POLO) are build on AVRs. (I promote itself ;-) - by me)

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valusoft:

Quote:

Interesting. 60 watts at 10% distortion ... does that mean the "help" ended up sounding like "yelp" so the front panel label got changed?

No it sounds like a dog (puppy) yelp!