Question about LCD character displays

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This is a question about the physical layout of LCD character displays - in particular, two-line displays like 16x2. And I'm referring to the type that have a single row of connecting pins, either 14 or 16 if backlit.

Sometimes I see pictures of these displays with the connector along the top of the display, and sometimes I see pictures with the connector along the bottom row of the display. If you do a google image search you'll see what I'm talking about. Do they really come both ways? Or are people just photographing displays upside down?

I'm laying out a board and I want to make sure I choose the right (or most popular) orientation. That seems to be connector at top left, but I wanted to ask around first.

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The displays come in BOTH upper corner, and lower corner. I have a display in front of me that has it on the upper AND lower.

Some even come with the connector on the side as a dual row pin header as well

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

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Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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jgmdesign wrote:
The displays come in BOTH upper corner, and lower corner. I have a display in front of me that has it on the upper AND lower.

Any sense as to which is more common?

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If you are looking at the screen, I usually see the interface on the upperr right side, with pin 1 all the way to the right.

It comes down to what works for your design.

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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This is a huge device. I suggest putting both pinnings in a PCB. It seems you are not designing a high volume mass product so that should not be a problem.

No RSTDISBL, no fun!

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Brutte wrote:
This is a huge device. I suggest putting both pinnings in a PCB. It seems you are not designing a high volume mass product so that should not be a problem.

Yep, I was thinking this might be the easiest thing to do. Assuming the mounting hole locations are the same.

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If its a 2x8 header for a ribbon cable, if you plug the header into the top or bottom of the board, it swaps the odd/even pins on the ribbon cable. There is no way for a human being to design the board so the cable will be correct on the first board turn. If you 'just hook it up', it will be backwards 9 out of 10 times. I know.

Imagecraft compiler user