Programming the Atmel devices using Android?

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#1
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Hi All

 

Is it possible to program Atmel devices with JTAGICE3, with an android device?

 

I would prefer to avoid taking my laptop when visiting PCB that are in the field, ideally just take a phone or a tablet.

 

 

 

 

Thanks

Regards

DJ

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When you say 'program' I assume you mean just upload a new flash image?

 

If so, there are several of us who use 'keyfob' programmers to do just that.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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In Google Play store look for "CC Tools". That is actually a complete copy of avr-gcc that runs on Android but I'm pretty sure that in the solution they include facilities to actually program AVRs. I haven't investigated how that works but assume it involves plugging SOMETHING into the USB port of the phone.

 

EDIT actually when I went looking for that I made this search:

 

https://play.google.com/store/se...

 

The results there include things like "AVR Flasher". I'm guessing that is more of a "standalone" tool for the job?

 

EDIT2: actually so far this one looks the most interesting:

 

https://play.google.com/store/ap...

 

Claims to be effectively "avrdude for Android".

Last Edited: Fri. Mar 2, 2018 - 12:38 PM
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You can also use a phone that runs plain linux.

Cannonical (Ubuntu) sold them for a while, but unfortunately  they seem to have dissapeared from their website.

 

Another route would be to slap a 3.5" lcd on a credit card size linux box.

Hardkernel has some nice hardware comninations for this:

 

C1-3.2inchTouchscreenDisplayShield.jpg

Source:

http://www.hardkernel.com/main/products/prdt_info.php?g_code=G142060963922

These boards are also pretty affordable:

USD 25 for an Odroid C1 main board.

USD 25 for the TFT (320x240 )

USD 17 for an exchangeble eMMC module.

USD 10 for a case.

USD 44 for an "UPS3" board with a 3Ah battery (bit of an unpleasant surprise, it's probably less popular?)

 

Hardkernel has quite some boards and display sizes to choose from All the way upto octocore processors and 8" displays.

I do not have any stock in Hardkernel, nor any other affiliation with them. It just seems to be the company with the widest range of Linux capable boards and hardware.

================================

Edit: Oops. I'm not even sure if JTAGICE3 is supported by Linux software.

Doing magic with a USD 7 Logic Analyser: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment/2421756#comment-2421756

Bunch of old projects with AVR's: http://www.hoevendesign.com

Last Edited: Fri. Mar 2, 2018 - 05:58 PM
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Get one of Alan's standalone avr programmers

 

/Bingo

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clawson wrote:
Claims to be effectively "avrdude for Android".
AVRDUDE with a GUI wrap.

AVRDUDE is dependent on libusb which has been ported to Android.

Maybe someone has ported AVRDUDE to Android.

If so and the Android device is in developer mode then it's AVRDUDE from the Android shell.

 


Zflasher AVR + USBtiny - YouTube

https://youtu.be/-Gh5i7FFv9k?t=1m22s (1m44s total)

[AVRDUDE log] 

ZFlasher AVR - Android app on AppBrain

https://www.appbrain.com/app/zflasher-avr/ru.zdevs.zflasheravr

https://github.com/libusb/libusb/tree/master/android

via

GitHub

libusb/libusb: A cross-platform library to access USB devices

https://github.com/libusb/libusb

 

Android is fairly prevalent on late model Chromebooks and currently one Chromebox :

Android Central

These are the Chromebooks that can run Android apps from Google Play

JERRY HILDENBRAND

15 Dec 2017

https://www.androidcentral.com/these-are-chromebooks-can-run-android-apps

 

https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromiumos/platform2/+/master/crosh/#Crosh-The-Chromium-OS-shell

Chrome OS shell -> bash :

https://www.chromium.org/chromium-os/poking-around-your-chrome-os-device#TOC-Getting-the-command-prompt-through-crosh

Chrome OS shell -> bash -> Android shell :

CodeWeavers

CrossOver Support

Create a debugging log *Developer Mode Only*

https://www.codeweavers.com/support/wiki/chromeos/createlog

[Wine debug log from Android shell]

more :

CodeWeavers Blogs

Josh DuBois

Wine on Android: A Saturday Afternoon Diversion

https://www.codeweavers.com/about/blogs/duboisj/2018/2/27/wine-on-android-a-saturday-afternoon-diversion

...

To do this I want to open a shell and look at the Unix process list.  Thankfully, I remembered to enable debugging features when I switched the Chromebook to developer mode earlier in the morning, so this should be possible.

I can get a very basic shell pressing by <ctrl>+<alt>+t.  That's an odd thing called a 'crosh' shell.  From there I type 'shell' to open a better, more normal bash shell. From there, I try /usr/sbin/android-sh to get a shell in the Chromebook's Android environment. Now I'm prompted for a root password due to the sudo.  I enter the root password I set during the transition to Developer Mode this morning.  I get a password failure.  After a few more attempts I'm still getting failures even though I'm confident I've entered the password correctly.  

I remember from experience that I must switch to a different virtual terminal by holding down <ctrl>+<alt>+"f2," where in my case "f2" is the third key from the left on the top row of my laptop's keyboard, and is labelled with a circular arrow on my Chromebook.  That key combo takes me to a text-based console with a 'localhost login:' prompt and an invitation to run 'chromeos-setdevpasswd' to change the chronos user password on my Chromebook.  I log in as 'root' using the root password I set during my transition to developer mode.  Then I run the chromeos-setdevpasswd command and give the same password (just to avoid confusion).  Then I switch back to my main console (where the Chrome OS gui session is) with <ctrl>+<alt>+"f1," where "f1" is the second-from-the-left top-most key on my keyboard (labelled on this Chromebook with a left-pointing arrow).  Now my sudo password is accepted.  

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sun. Mar 4, 2018 - 07:18 PM