Predict the first real "board in hand" post?

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It will be interesting to predict when the first real question relating to a real board-in-hand appears. I won't hold my breath waiting; I'll go with September 23.

Another interesting development to watch will be to see if AVRFreaks keeps expanding to "support" the AVR32 as Atmel has stated, or whether there will be a split as there was with AT91.com.

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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I wouldn't be at all surprised to see a split at some point. After all, the code, peripherals, tools and techniques are all different from the AVR 8-bit micros.

Sean.

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I hate to sound a negative opinion, but I think AVR32 has a hard road to tread. I'd need a lot of incentive to use one at the present time, given the limited range of devices and resources currently available. This is not going to be a repeat of the "AVR vs PIC/8051/HC11" battle, where the AVR-8's hardware superiority crushed all opponents. That only happened because all the major vendors had neglected the 8-bit market for a decade, to concentrate on building up a presence in 32's. ARM has a colossal head start. Its software base is huge, it's available from multiple vendors and smaller ARMs are practically free. For the kind of application that needs high speed and huge memory, like AV, clock speeds are so high that any hardware advantages become fairly insignificant. I'm sure the AVR32 will eventually carve out a niche for itself, but I can't see it making inroads into areas already served by ARM, and right now I can't see what else you'd use it for.

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I'd agree wth peret's statements except - the R&D and sustainment costs for a chip product line like AVR32 are pretty darned large. So some business development person at Atmel has a marketplace analysis that made sense to the beancounters at Atmel to get the thing funded.

(I hope I'm not giving them too much credit for due dilligence)

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In the 8-bit space, the ecosystem was already populated with PICs, which have clear architectural disadvantages when compared to the AVRs. The AVRs therefore have a general advantage.

However, in the 32-bit space, the ecosystem is already full of, mostly, ARM-based MCUs. The advantage that the AVR has over these will have to be pretty huge for it to supplant them completely, although it is quite possible that it will succeed pretty quickly in niche markets.

Of course, the only real way to find out is to wait and see...

Sean.

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Quote:
the only real way to find out is to wait and see...

No ARM in doing that... :mrgreen:

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Quote:
smaller ARMs are practically free

Those ARM chips from Phillips are sure cheap :)

Quote:
No ARM in doing that...

heeheehee..I detect an Aussie accent there mate :)

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Gwen wrote:

Those ARM chips from Phillips are sure cheap :)

And they are pretty sweet too. They certainly are not "first timey" chips for the folks who need a simple controller, or useful for those nut-jobs who insist on making their own PC boards. But if I were to design something that even hinted of a need for a high end AVR, I would probably jump ship and swim on over to the ARM raft.

Some Traitorous Guy

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i want to show in charecture lcd my charecture but my charecture how i want to show is over yhan 100
what i can to do???????

mr.khosavi@yahoo.no

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stevech wrote:
I'd agree wth peret's statements except - the R&D and sustainment costs for a chip product line like AVR32 are pretty darned large. So some business development person at Atmel has a marketplace analysis that made sense to the beancounters at Atmel to get the thing funded.

The AVR32 is clearly an iPod/mobile-phone chip. Given that everyone reading here almost certainly owns both of those devices (possibly several!) then I think there's probably a pretty big market for the AVR32. It's selling point over competing ARM and DSP solutions would appear to be mainly it's very healthy MIPS per Watt figures.

But it is kind of confusing that it's support forum is buried amongst all the other AVR-8 stuff. I can't believe that Atmel think that the kind of engineers using the AVR-8 are going to be the same ones interested in MPEG processors (though, rather oddly, I am in fact!)

Cliff