PIC basic or Basic stamp ?

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Hi,
I have been wanting to get a starter kit for some time now.
I have read some info and still have tons to read.
One question, which starter kit ( PIC basic or basic Stamp ) has the ability to recognize the program of an already programmed chip ? I think this would be a great way to learn the programming and the language.
Also the EPICWIN software looks excellent, can the 2 programming basic kits I mentioned use EPICWIN ?

Any info appreciated

Thanks
Greg

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Greg
This site is for AVR (ATMEL) you may get an answer to your question but would suggest you look at using the AVR range not the PIC range.
Mike

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What you are looking for would be lovely indeed, and not only for beginners. But on the other hand, it is the power of low level programming to be different then others.

The first thing you will have to choose is a range of controllers. That might be fe the PIC range, or the STAMP range or the ATMEL range. Being member of this forum/site I would suggest the ATMEL range would be the best range of course.

The first rule ever on choosing your favourit line of controllers is: What are people around you using?: Just use the same one!!!

Later on, if you would like to have programms translated from one system to ATMEL AVR you can always ask this forum again if no answer was already supplied.

Succes and much fun

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Greg,

You came to the right place, we will help put you back onto the right path. :twisted:

What you need is a few ATMega8L chips. These are high performance micros available in a 28 pin DIP with a good assortment of I/O ADCs, PWMs, USART, etc. included. I suggest the 'L' (low voltage) so that your first project could run anywhere from 2.7 to 5.5V e.g. 2 to 3 'aa' cells. Later, with more experience you'll buy chips based on your needs for speed, power, I/O, etc. They can be reprogrammed ten thousand times.

Check under 'devices' for a data sheet for this powerhouse. Average retail for the PDIP28 ATMega8L in single units is about US $5. :mrgreen:

You don't need a development kit, but it sure is handy. The STK500 is just $80. There's also the free AVR Studio which includes an assembler, and will simulate most AVR chips. If you want to start programming without spending much money you can build a programmer for a parts cost of about $3.

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Hi,

I'd state with the STK500 for sure, and maybe a few Mega8's (the STk500 will come with at least one AVR though).

Then you could use the BASOM-AVR language if you want to use BASIC, there is even a free demo version of it (code sized limited only).

-Colin

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i learned on a stamp and swithed to avr as they have much more to offer at a much greater speed. the stamp was fun but it was too costly per chip and i outgrew it quickly. the stamp wasnt a total waste of $ as my 12 yr old brother now plays (he wants to build a battle bot - not there yet). id spend the few extra bucks on an stk500 and a compiler in the language of your choice. the cost will be offset when you build a few projects. in addition to a few mega8, get a couple of tiny26 and a mega32. this will wide range of power. and, when your inspired to do a project, its nice to have the right uc on hand. good luck.

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Thanks people,
I will look into an STK500 kit soon. I need an AVR dictionary now.
Is a compiler a hardware add-on for the programmer, or is it the software program ? I know, I have a lot to learn.
Hey and I have a user name now too. Moving up in the world.

GPo

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Quote:
Is a compiler a hardware add-on for the programmer, or is it the software program ?

AVRStudio (an IDE) contains an assembler and simulator. It comes with the STK500 kit and also is downloadable from this website and ATMEL's website.

A compiler will be an extra piece of software - check the 'tools' section, there are lots of options, ranging from free to a couple of thousand bucks.

Andreas

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Hi,

The compiler lets you use a different language than the native assembly language that the AVR understands.

So for example you could program in BASIC (good beginner language) using BASOM-AVR, or C using WinAVR (free compiler). The compiler then converts this language into a language the AVR understands.

-Colin

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Thanks for the info.
I am buying programmed Micro 8 pin chips PIC12CE674 for my motion camera sensors for the triggering and the set-up options.
Can anyone suggest an AVR 8 pin chip, 6 I/O, that I could use for this application ? I has to be an 8 pin chip. I am wiring my own 16 pin sockets with a PS2501-2 opto for the 2 camera circuits. 5.5 volt max.

GPo

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Tell us more.. do you use the ADCs? What speed are you running?

At first glance, the Tiny15 seems like a sensible overlap in features, depending on what you're actually using. If this is a few months down the line, the Tiny13 should be available, which is expected to be faster/cheaper etc.,

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mneary,
I really can't tell you more because I'm not sure. I don't have a kit yet, but I'm sure I'll have the STK500 by late March.
I am just now downloading the BASCOM-AVR program with a sample chip code from another Trail Camera programmer that helps me sometime
It is a sample.bas file.
I'll know more as I learn this stuff.

Thanks again

GPo (Greg)