Ouch, not recommended way to solder....

Go To Last Post
44 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0


It's nice he's teaching how to solder, but the burned fingers are dead give away that is not how its done (the smoke is a nice touch)!

 

Jim

 

FF = PI > S.E.T

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

It must be really dangerous to be a model in a stock-photo agency: https://www.avrfreaks.net/commen...

 

surprise

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Bad perspective, perhaps, but the solder body seems to be larger than 7.0 in.

Or, another trick to match a smoke?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 2


“Everyone knows that debugging is twice as hard as writing a program in the first place. So if you're as clever as you can be when you write it, how will you ever debug it?” - Brian W. Kernighan
“Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

very glad you picked that one up by the correct end!!

 

surprise laugh

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

They really let you down:

 

Batteries not included

crying

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 5


My surface mount irons...

 

Ross McKenzie, Melbourne Australia

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

SMD, really? Reminds me of Murphy's law:

 

Rule for precision: Measure with a micrometer. Mark with chalk... Cut with an axe.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

A curious point though: all those hot-end photos suggest that untrained people will seek to control a heavy tool from close to the working point, like a pen. Certainly precision is improved if your fingers are on fire... but perhaps there is mileage in an iron with a shorter tip?

 

Neil

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Are those small battery-operated soldering pens any good? Has anyone tried them?

 

Looks pretty convenient but I guess they need recharge quite often...

/Jakob Selbing

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

jaksel wrote:

Are those small battery-operated soldering pens any good? Has anyone tried them?

No but I did use a Gas (Butane) Powered Iron when I did Field Service work in my youth. It wasn't very good though. It got far far too hot and melted everything within a few inches of the  joint. All my rework looked a total mess. I know bad workmen always blame their tools; but this time it was true.

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

valusoft wrote:

 

My dad had irons like this when I was a young boy, and he shared his story about learning by feeling the pain. He picked one up by the wrong end when he was a boy. He never did that again! Luckily I learned from his mistakes. yes

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
  • No, I do not believe in software or intellectual property piracy or theft
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

 

I used to use one of these Nicad units a lot & it worked great (for a few connections here & there)...I still have the box & the base on a back shelf, but haven't seen the iron in about 35 years!  Prob at the bottom of a box of junk parts.  Back then, I practiced picking up my actual soldering iron from the wrong end a lot, as I had no stand.  I looked this Wahl cordless iron up & it seems like they actually still make it (and it still seems like nicad)...that's good NRE return.

Now they also offer lithium battery model!

Iso-Tip was founded by Wahl Clipper’s Industrial Division in 1971. Using Wahl’s rechargeable battery technology, the company invented the world’s first successful cordless rechargeable soldering iron. In December 2008, Senasys purchased the Iso-Tip line from Wahl Clipper. Today, Iso-Tip is located in Altoona, Wisconsin and offers a full line of professional heat tools.

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Wed. Jan 12, 2022 - 10:23 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I'm guessing their is some fundamental law of the universe that says that if a soldering iron falls off a bench and you instinctively go to grab it then you always catch it by the hot end. (don't ask me how I know this).

 

I suppose it's a bit like buttered toast (that always falls sticky side down!)??

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I think there is a corollary to that which states that if you need something on the workbench that happens to be behind your iron in it's stand, when you reach for it the softest part of your forearm will always be the contact point with the hot iron tip! I still have the scar! laugh

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
  • No, I do not believe in software or intellectual property piracy or theft
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

clawson wrote:
buttered toast (that always falls sticky side down!)??

So this has actually been the subject of scientific study: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buttered_cat_paradox#In_reality

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

WayneZA wrote:
My dad had irons like this when I was a young boy

 

There are many around, and they can be clean by a simple method.

 

So, my friend lent his 220v 350W brand new solder to his neighbor. On return, a new solder behaved like a rattlesnake.

 

How, how, why? he asked himself and neighbor- I immersed the solder into water, as it should be- he answered.

Last Edited: Wed. Jan 12, 2022 - 11:24 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

That is all too true--and what you need is never the stuff sitting out front.   Mentioning benches, at least 3 companies I know had workbench drawers with sharp corners for tearing technician's pants...Not sure if it is a common malady, but saw it multiple places.  Once, some VP ripped a 6 inch gash in his expensive slacks, just as important visitors arrived for a demo.  We managed to keep a straight face. 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

avrcandies wrote:
  Once, some VP ripped a 6 inch gash in his expensive slacks, just as important visitors arrived for a demo.  We managed to keep a straight face. 

but did you get an upgrade to the bench drawers?

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 2

 

but did you get an upgrade to the bench drawers?

I seem to remember the tech applied about 20 layers (for good measure) of duct tape to the corner of the drawer to "round it out" ...the bends in the sheet metal perhaps make a jagged snag point.

 

The stool height is perfect for getting your leg pinched under the corner...get up and rip! 

 

I know for certain I have visited other labs where I noticed the drawers have tape, bumpers, etc applied.. I was wondering if many others have seen this.

 

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Wed. Jan 12, 2022 - 11:53 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ki0bk wrote:
It's nice he's teaching how to solder, but the burned fingers are dead give away that is not how its done (the smoke is a nice touch)!

 

Better with breadboard to avoid toxic fumes.

 

www.tokopedia.com/madagang .Buy and Donated cheap electronics and manuscripts.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

avrcandies wrote:
I know for certain I have visited other labs where I noticed the drawers have tape, bumpers, etc applied.. I was wondering if many others have seen this.

Yikes! that brought back painful memories I had long since forgotten! 

 

avrcandies wrote:

  I looked this Wahl cordless iron up & it seems like they actually still make it (and it still seems like nicad)...that's good NRE return.

Now they also offer lithium battery model!

I had one of those in my early years of electronic building, the battery would last about 45 minutes to an hour IIRC, which forced me to take a break while it recharged!

I should get another one, glad to hear they are still available.

 

 

 

FF = PI > S.E.T

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

The worst event I managed with a smouldering iron was when a colleague left an iron - with a hook - hanging off the carry handle of a scope. The scope was on a trolley and the handle in front of and somewhat below the scope front panel. I put my hand out to adjust the scope, didn't see the iron, and speared it into the flashy part of my hand behind the little finger by about an inch and a half. Never felt a thing until I tried to bring my hand back... I guess it cauterised as fast as it went in. It took months to heal, though...

 

Neil

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ki0bk wrote:

avrcandies wrote:
(and it still seems like nicad).....

Now they also offer lithium battery model!

I had one of those in my early years of electronic building, the battery would last about 45 minutes to an hour IIRC, which forced me to take a break while it recharged!

I should get another one, glad to hear they are still available.

 

I would imagine with the energy density of 18650s and other batteries nowadays they could extend that a fair bit further. 45 mins isn't exactly a long time, although as you said it gave you lots of breaks. smiley

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
  • No, I do not believe in software or intellectual property piracy or theft
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

WayneZA wrote:
ots of breaks.

 

Gentlemen, I must remind you that on the internet it is mandatory to confuse the homonyms 'breaks' (pauses) and 'brakes' (retardation device) and in all cases use the wrong word in text.

 

On this thread the correct word has been used several times!

 

Please stop braking this rule, or people will be confused. cheeky

 

Neil (who reads too many car fora populated by the illiterati)

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Well, I don't want to brake the trend then ..... wink

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
  • No, I do not believe in software or intellectual property piracy or theft
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Good point---their is never a bad time too say things write!

I get to reed many awful papers sent my way--its a reel feet to understand them!

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Thu. Jan 13, 2022 - 08:19 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Just taking a brake for coffee, back in a mo' ....

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

   a brake for coffee

 

Not easy. Yet a system odd-even on days does works to me.

For example, today (13) is odd- non coffee day.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

clawson wrote:
Just taking a brake for coffee,

did you take it to your  pad ... ?

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ki0bk wrote:

I had one of those in my early years of electronic building, the battery would last about 45 minutes to an hour IIRC, which forced me to take a break while it recharged!

I should get another one, glad to hear they are still available.

Yes,that’s Radio transistor with AA/AAA cells.Now,even the Low cost digital market had low consumption power.

www.tokopedia.com/madagang .Buy and Donated cheap electronics and manuscripts.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Yes,that’s Radio transistor with AA/AAA cells.Now,even the Low cost digital market had low consumption power.

 You'll have to explain that--soldering is not low power.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

avrcandies wrote:

Good point---their is never a bad time too say things write!

I get to reed many awful papers sent my way--its a reel feet to understand them!

 

Don't you mean offal papers?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

avrcandies wrote:
You'll have to explain that--soldering is not low power.
Depend on the size of tip... I just suggest that at elementary school(Ki0BK child) started with breadboard and avoid toxic fumes first.

www.tokopedia.com/madagang .Buy and Donated cheap electronics and manuscripts.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0


Ah I love the smell of burnt rosin in the morning!  

 

FF = PI > S.E.T

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ki0bk wrote:

Ah I love the smell of burnt rosin in the morning!  

 

Now THAT'S a blast from the past!

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
  • No, I do not believe in software or intellectual property piracy or theft
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

Dropped tools always seek the bare foot.

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Torby wrote:
Dropped tools always seek the bare foot.

Not sure what is worse, dropped tools or a hot solder blob!

 

FF = PI > S.E.T

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Dropped tool, splattered upon, or perhaps stepped on...

 

My patient, but fortunately not my foot!

 

JC

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ki0bk wrote:
a hot solder blob

 

Carefully, specially during summer soldering (if you catch a blob by unprotected leg).

As for winter, a solidified blob is difficult to remove from woolen clothes (do not ask me how I know).

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

OUCH! I can see broken bone. So was the object unscrewed? Shoe cut off?

Ross McKenzie, Melbourne Australia

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Unscrewing seems the logical approach for an engineer, but I'm trying to work out how on earth he got that blunt rod through shoe and foot. I can't see anyone actually walking over something like that without noticing 'hey, that's a little uncomfy' and stopping, but perhaps he jumped down and found it waiting?

 

Neil (who has experience finding the ground unexpectedly).

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

IIRC he jumped down from a loading dock to the ground.

 

I did my thing, (X-rays, IV, tDap, Ancef, pain meds, etc.), and then sent him off to surgery.

Once in surgery, under general anesthesia, they removed the shoe, removed the bolt, and did whatever wound cleaning and repair they needed to do.

Some of these patients need multiple surgeries to fix the problem.

 

JC

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

DocJC wrote:
I did my thing, (X-rays, IV, tDap, Ancef, pain meds, etc.)
yes Did you had the Chemical trash of it ?

www.tokopedia.com/madagang .Buy and Donated cheap electronics and manuscripts.