O/T your language of 'origin'?

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I was commenting on another thread and found myself wondering which language I first learned to programme in. After some thought I remembered that I learned to programme in 6th form at school (aged about 16), which was a long time ago. The language was an assembler for an olivetti machine that had a few registers, virtually no RAM and about as much processing power as a sub $1 calculator now.

I then went on to learn and use:

at uni - Basic, Algol 60, Fortran, and PDP-11 assembler
At work - PDP-11 assembler, Coral-66 (weapons systems), VAX assembler (device drivers and o/s support), Bliss (o/s support), PL/1 (system programming), VAX microcode (development of add-on memory and other peripherals), C (system programming, including o/s development for a multi-user 8080 based micro), smalltalk (for fun), C++ (windows applications development) and Java (for fun).

Oh, and nearly forgot, for my first real job I was trained in COBOL on a mainframe! Luckily though the company realised that I'd programmed PDP-11s at university and moved me to a specialist department so, although I learned it, I've never used COBOL in anger :)

For some time now I have coded mostly just for fun. For a living I 'architect' large application systems.

I'd be interested to know the programming language background of other forum users if you fancy penning it. Just out of curiosity :)

Not that I've stuck imaginary labels on any of you ;)

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English, then assembly, then BASIC (late 1970's, early 1980'S vintage) , then Pascal, then C. and a little FROTRAN, COBOL, ALGOL in between.

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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In rough chronologic order starting as a preteen: HP and TI programmable calculators (1975), Basic (1976), assembly (1977), Pascal (1979), Fortran (1980), C (1983), Perl, C++, Shell script / UNIX tools, Java, Matlab, Scheme, ANSI Common Lisp (2002) with some Python and Ruby.

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I took a fortran class in hi school about '69. Did fortran in EE school thru '73, then started at a place that used 6800s then most other moto cpus up thru 68020s for io boards, and vaxes and microvaxes for the maintenance simulators. Had to teach myself basic then pascal then c. Still havent learned anything newer than c. Cant do c++ or c# or java or perl or python. Just an old dinosaur.

Imagecraft compiler user

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FORTRAN IV (1966), assembly (Honeywell mainframe), SNOBOL, timesharing BASIC, SIMSCRIPT, a little COBOL, more assembly (8080, Z80, 6802, etc.), C (1984), FORTH, VB (DOS and Windows), various scripting languages (Javascript, VB script, Notes), among others which escape me now.

Chuck Baird

"I wish I were dumber so I could be more certain about my opinions. It looks fun." -- Scott Adams

http://www.cbaird.org

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Skipping a few: FORTRAN II, Assembly for DG Nova; assembly for PDP-11; original BASIC/Tymshare; Assembly for 6809; Pascal, C, Ada, C, MS Visual Basic; assembly for PIC and AVR, more C, C some more. (and brief tangents on Java and Java Script).

Unpopular opinion that C++ and OOP is software running amok with a grand canyon of abstractions.

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Ok I can see that I’m young. :wink:
ASM, BASIC 1978. (for 6502)
PASCAL 1981 in high school (Org turbo pascal for CP/m 17.5 K version).
My first 68000 computer 1985 C programming
My first PC in 1986 and with that Borland turbo pascal and more C, and ASM.
I had to have ASM, pascal PLM/86 Fortran lisp prolog at university.1983-1988
DANBOT we had to write at compiler and DANBOT (Danish robot) was our project. (written in turbo pascal) 1986
After that most of my programming have been C and ASM to 4, 8, 16,32 bit controllers

Jens

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BASIC
Assembly
Pascal
C
C variants

(Others not worthy of mention.)

C: i = "told you so";

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8060 (SC/MP) machine code, 6502 machine code, (then I started buying assemblers - I remember Avocet was rather nice for the 6502), 6800, 8080, 6809, 6805, 8088/6/386 assembler, Basic (microsoft, on the Tangerine), Forth (on the Tangerine and on the Jupiter), C, C++ (bleagh), AVR assembly, Bascom.

Barely literate, really...

Neil

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My 'origin' for learning an existing language was Gotran on an IBM 1620 using punched cards and printouts from the console typewriter. It belonged to our high school district office and they let us use it two nights a week. Gotran is a Simplified 12 instruction subset of FORTRAN.
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/histor...

Later I was on a team that created the micro-code for a 2901 bit slice custom processor. Its language was circuit descriptions, pin outs and digital signatures processed directly into machine code to run the embedded bit slice. This was my 'origin' for creating a language from scratch.

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Cardiac machine code (cf. http://www.porticus.org/bell/belllabs_kits_cardiac.html) was my first language. :wink: That was followed by 1802, 6502, PDP-11 and Micronova assembly languages, and then lots of C and family, with a brief but happily cured recidivistic period of PIC assembler a few years back.

Lately I have been using Python when the system can support it. It is an absolute hoot for embedded work. I recently used it in an autonomous deep sea lander that is now poking holes in the mud at ca. 6000 m depth.

- John

Last Edited: Fri. Dec 21, 2007 - 08:57 AM
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OK, I'll play along...

Algol 803(circa 1967/8 ), Fortran, assembler for 6800/3/9, Forth, Basic, GeeWiz Basic, Pascal, dBase (various), Clipper S'87/5.01/5.2, MiniGUI, Bascom...cannot pretend to know assembler for any AVR...but have it on the list as a "todo".

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Mallorqui
Castellano (Spanish)
Pascal
Basic
Assembler for 8086/8088
Assembler for 8051
English
Assembler for PIC :S
Visual Basic
Assembler for AVR
C
Visual C#

Merry Xmas. Feliz Navidad. Bones Festes.

Guillem.
"Common sense is the least common of the senses" Anonymous.

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Cool thread! Especially seeing Ross' Algol entry. That language is special to me. Never used it myself, but that was what my late father used when running statistical models on the SMIL computer at the local uni in the early sixties. I still have his Algol book somewhere...

Myself: BASIC (circa 1976), Pascal ('79), and then COBOL, SQL, Simula, Lisp, Modula-2, APL, (DG MV8000-)assembler, C, C++, (some Java), HTML, Perl, XML, C#... The road never ends - if you stop you risk dying.

So, language of origin: BASIC. Language of choice: C/C++. The language of choice I wished I had: Java. New challenge right now: C#/.Net, Language I wish I had time to learn: Ruby.

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

Last Edited: Fri. Dec 21, 2007 - 11:46 AM
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Mike B wrote:
My 'origin' for learning an existing language was Gotran on an IBM 1620 using punched cards and printouts from the console typewriter.

I programmed one of those. It was a "scientific" computer that used decimal numbers. But the one I used had paper tape, not punched cards. I don't remember the programming language.

My first language was MAD. It allegedly stood for Michigan Algorithm Decoder. It was an improvement over Fortran. The next language was assembler. Both of these languages were used to program an IBM 704. That was a real computer. It used vacuum tubes, not transistors.

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I can remember the chronological order of my first experiences OK, but it gets fuzzy later because the novelty of acquiring a language diminished.

  • FORTH, then Basic and a tiny bit of APL at about the same time;
  • Z80 machine language, 6502 machine language and Pascal at about the same time;
  • C and then later lots of C++;
  • FORTH so that I actually understood it instead of just toying with it enough to call it my first programming language;
  • Assembly language for various CPUs but mostly x86;
  • Modula, Ada (uni courses only);
  • Scripting languages for various navigational databases (DBase, Paradox);
  • Object Pascal (Delphi);
  • SQL and related stored procedure languages for a range of relational databases;
  • Assembly for various micros - Motorola and of course AVR;
  • Java (around 1999, and still using it today);
  • Shell scripting types of languages, especially Bash;
  • XSLT and many other web related technologies that only sort-of count as languages;
  • Javascript, ActionScript (Flex);
  • Ruby (about 2 years, and I still get a kick out of how cool it can be).
There's a number of other little bits and pieces mixed in there as well in small quantities - Python, TCL, and others that I could really only use now with reference material open in front of me. There's also lots of libraries, frameworks, and tools, which I think accounts for considerably more learning than just the languages.

I try to learn a new language whenever it is being used in a project I am involved in or when something particularly interesting comes along. I think there's a lot of value in learning a new language or programming practice - getting used to something a bit different like Ruby can expand your programming horizons.

Michael

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Heh, my list:

BASIC
Visual Basic
C on PCs
C on AVRs
BrainF*ck on PC
PHP
Currently learning Java

There are pointy haired bald people.
Time flies when you have a bad prescaler selected.

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Warm memories are coming up...

languages and CPUs:

1976 TI58 pocket-calculator
1976 machine language of home-brew TTL computer
1977 NUALGOL on a UNIVAC1108
1977 8080 assembler
1978 Tiny Basic
1978 Poly88 Basic
1979 Fortran on a (German) TR440
1979 Cobol
1979 TR440 assembler (using german mnemonics !)
1980 Pascal
1984 8048 assembler
1984 Fortran on a CDC175 and on a PDP11/60
1985 NS32000 assembler
1985 C
1990 Forth on a Harris RTX2000
1991 80x86 assembler
1991 8051 assembler
1995 PIC assembler (sorry, but I got paid for a PIC project)
2000 Java
2002 AVR assembler
2004 C on AVR

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Quote:

on a UNIVAC1108

Oh, yes - those where the days: 36-bit words, Fieldata encoding, punched cards, linking was "@MAP,NIX" (ain't it strange what useless things that stays forever in memory). Sobbing uncontrollably now...

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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1968 -- Analog computers for engineering projects (summer intern; probably doesn't count)
1969-1973 -- At university: FORTRAN, SNOBOL, LISP, FOCAL (BASIC-like), COBOL
Machine languages/assembler: PDP/8, CDC 8080, CARDIAC, CDC 6400, IBM 360
1970's -- Burroughs machines, all ranges. COBOL, ALGOL, FORTAN, MPL (Pascal/C-like block structured systems language) Medium Systems were BCD machines.
TRS80 BASIC
1980's & 1990's -- DEC VAX/VMS; FORTRAN was the "system" language. Some C & COBOL.
8080, 8086, 80186 embedded
PCs in C and assembler and many other languages in vogue, e.g., FORTH, Modula2
2000's -- virtually all AVR in CodeVision C, some ASM. PC-side in VisualBASIC6.
Some for other microcontrollers: x51 in C & ASM; Moto '08 in C & ASM

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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Reading through these made me remember one I had pounded out of my memory - binary machine code on the Altair. The January, 1975 issue of Popular Electronics had the MITS Altair on the cover, and I immediately ordered one. I got serial number ~375 when it arrived. No software of any kind. You used the front panel switches to toggle in addresses and opcodes and do manual loads. Power glitch? (quite common) - Repeat.

Chuck Baird

"I wish I were dumber so I could be more certain about my opinions. It looks fun." -- Scott Adams

http://www.cbaird.org

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ZX Spectrum Basic
hp41C assembler
Z80 assembler
DG Nova assembler
Fortran 77
Pascal
PLM 51
uPP Pascal
ELM
C
ReXX
Transputer assembler
C++
Smalltalk
Java
Ruby
AVR assembler
... and some more

Who would have thought, it all started with a Spectrum of a friend of mine, in basic.

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I'm a "youngster" :-)

1978 : Ti-59 & Basic (Z80)
1980 : My first Motorola D2kit 6800 Hex
1981 : My first Home uC , a combined 6800/6809 , based on Flex O/S , Basic/assembler
1983 : My first VME 68010 (had a friend at Motorola) , assembler
1983 : Got the cpu upgraded to a MC68020 , assembler
1985 : Programming a TI-990 system (DX10/DNOS) in assembler 
1986 : Got my first PC (an 8Mhz Nec V20) , w. a Seagate ST225 (25Mb hdd) , thought i'd never run out of diskspace.
       Startd in Pascal (Turbo) , then Turbo C.
1987 : Started w. C for real , and wrote my first device driver for the TI-990. 
       Wrote a my first device driver for a VAX 730.
1988 : Wrote my first device driver for I386 and DOS , in assembler.
1990 : C (Lattice on DOS) & assembler , started out w. OS/2
       Started out on IBM SNA , and did VTAM for 8 years
..
1996 : Misc private programming in C , doing TCP/IP routing on the job.
..
2003 : Starting out with AVR @home
..
..
Now  : Well still doing C on PC & AVR

/Bingo
 


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Yipes! Is there anyone else, besides me, with less than 10 years of programming experience?

There are pointy haired bald people.
Time flies when you have a bad prescaler selected.

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Yeah, Dean's only been doing it a couple of year, I think. Mind you, he knocked up a USB stack in about fifteen minutes :D

Damn, just remembered that I forgot to include my EZ64 CPU machine code... I designed it, so I can claim exclusivity there... if only I had enough time to sit down and find why it doesn't quite work :mrgreen:

Neil

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Assembler, Basic and Forth for some Z80 systems in the 80ties.
Than I switched to PC based systems and there were TurboPascal and
TurboC my favorites. The next decade saw me with perl and python and
some more scripting languages. Very recently I went back to
forth and enjoy it again (on Atmegas)

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What a list the above represents!

I started in high school with a PDP-8, load the paper tape, then run your Basic. (Transistors).
PDP-8 used an ASR-33 Teletpye at 110 baud, with a 20mA current loop serial interface.
About then I learned the Sinclair Basic, (Z85 if I recall the processor), TV for display, tape cassette for storage.
My favorite calculator of all time, the HP-45, (I think the HP-65 was the programmable one).
College: Fortran on punch cards on a Vax, & 8080 Assembly Lang on home made system.
Then Basic on the Vax.
A smigin of 8086/80186 Assembly.
Fortran, F77 and MNF versions.
GW-Basic on PCs.
Turbo Basic, (Bob Zale's Language). ISRs and hardward control on PC from Basic.
Power Basic, (Advanced version of Turbo Basic).
Visual Basic, (And total loss of real time hardware control, :cry: )
ADA on Cray I for NSA
Just kidding on the last one 8)
The Basics of HTML

Bascom, on AVR, as of last week, still a newbie.

Never made the jump to C, but the book is on the shelf...
Sitting next to my Learn Java in 21 days book...
Sitting next to my HTTP, The Definitive Guide book...

I learned German and Morse Code along the way, too, but I believe I permanently
fried the fuse bits controlling that part of my memory long ago.

Somewhere, buried deeply in my basement, is the issue of Popular Electronics with the
Altair on the cover. Such memories!

JC

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Dang, this will be painful...

1970 - HP Timeshare Basic - on a Teletype ASR 33; I was 15.
1971 - FORTRAN II for Univac SS/80 (vintage 1959 - magnetic amplifiers! Card compiler! Drum memory!)
1971 - RPG (card only) for Univac 9800 (summer job)
1972 - HP 9800 "calculator" language (~RPN)
1972 - HP Basic for 9810/20
1973 - Fortran IV for CDC 6400
1974 - Assembly for CDC 6400 (University only)
1975 - Fortran IV for Univac 1108 (summer job)
1975 - Cobol for Univac 1108 (summer job)
1976 - Intel 8080 Assembly for Altair 8800 (mine, like Chuck's)
1977 - Opus One for Altair 8800 (summer job)
1977 - Snobol, Algol, LISP for CDC6400 (University only)
1977 - DEC LSI-11 Assembly
1977 - FORTRAN IV for LSI-11 (part-time job thru 1978)
1979 - Ratfor for HP 3000 (the last Fortran I learned)
1980 - SCL for HP 3000 (SCL was 3000's "Assembly")
1980 - HPL for HP 9825 (don't ask)
1980 - IBM 370 JCL (trust me, it's a language!)
1981 - UCSD Pascal
1983 - Motorola 68000 Assembly
1983 - "ModCal" for HP 9826/36
1984 - C on HPUX ("bastard" AT&T Unix)
1984 - Awk (wrote 2 3000-line programs in 1992!)
1988 - Verilog (used for simulations of ICs)
1994 - Perl
1996 - C++ on WinDoze
1996 - Intel x86 Assembly
2000 - PHP (variant of Perl)
2003 - Java (well, just played with it)
2004 - LabView (yup, it's a language!)

I left out some of the more mundane items like HP65/69/29/... calculator stuff. I also left out the assembly for the two different computer architectures I designed in school for projects. Finally, I've probably forgotten a language or two somewhere.

Oh, and let's not get started on OSes or Editors, eh?

(brings a tear to my eye) :cry:

Stu

Edit 1: Added LabView

Engineering seems to boil down to: Cheap. Fast. Good. Choose two. Sometimes choose only one.

Newbie? Be sure to read the thread Newbie? Start here!

Last Edited: Fri. Dec 21, 2007 - 10:33 PM
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Quote:

1975 - Cobol for Univac 1108

Stu-san! All is forgotten! Assuming "ASCII COBOL":
@ACOB,ISEX

@MAP,NIX
@XQT

(Some more of this and I'll have to go down in the basement and find that old card stack...)

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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Johan wrote:
Quote:

1975 - Cobol for Univac 1108

Stu-san! All is forgotten! Assuming "ASCII COBOL":
@ACOB,ISEX

@MAP,NIX
@XQT

(Some more of this and I'll have to go down in the basement and find that old card stack...)

Oh, yah! The fun part of that job was trying to make interactive changes to a program...

Log on (enter user and password).. go have coffee

5 minutes later: Get a command prompt. Start editor. Go plan the exact edits you need to make.

5 minutes later: Get the editor prompt. Enter first edit change.

60 seconds later: make second change...

You get the idea. The 1108 was not geared for interactive. We had a card remote station and I did most of my work that way.

Best part of the job: I created a land data database using Fortran for data selection and COBOL for formatting. Oh, and they had a Calcomp drum plotter, so I wrote a graphic program to plot results. Way cool for the time.

Stu

Engineering seems to boil down to: Cheap. Fast. Good. Choose two. Sometimes choose only one.

Newbie? Be sure to read the thread Newbie? Start here!

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And if I remember right, there was something like

PIC 9999

in COBOL :shock:

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Yes, ossi. You got the PICTURE right.

Stu wrote:
trying to make interactive changes

CTS (Conversational Timesharing System) maybe? Now I gotta go find that old manual binder also...

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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stu_san wrote:
Dang, this will be painful...

1980 - IBM 370 JCL (trust me, it's a language!)

He..He

We used to call it "Job Cancelling Language" , i hated those DD cards , but as a VTAM maintainer i had to use it ....

/Bingo

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Oh, it's hard to remember dates, but order is that:
Fortran IV
Basic ZX Spectrum
Basic Amstrad CPC
Assembler 6502 (Atari XL)
Turbo Pascal CP/M
Turbo Pascal on PC
Assembler 8086
C
Modula
Derive
Assembler Z80
Assembler 8051
C++
AWK
RPL hp48
TCL/TK
Scilab
MuPAD
Maxima
Assembler AVR
Python

That's all, I thing. ;-)

Suplement
I thing wrong. :-)
I must add:
Logo
TopSpeed make (it's different language that GNU make)
bash scripts

Last Edited: Sat. Dec 22, 2007 - 12:27 AM
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Turbo pascal, using turtle graphics. Circa, 1992-1993.
'those were the days.
Matt

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I feel so young here.

Vilnius BASIC, 1994

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I'm 21 so my list is short :(

-C
-ASM for ARM, 8051 and AVR
-VHDL

I wanna be an expert on VHDL and C only :)

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"gugu-gaga"(1989), Estonian(1992), English(1995), German(2000), C(2000), C++(2001), Basic(2002), Russian(2003), GCC(2005), PHP(2007)

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Basic
Pascal
Assembler (6502)
Fortran (a little)
ARexx
Modula2
Oberon2
C with a little C++
Assembler (AVR)

And a few experiments in Forth, Next, Postscript

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we ought to have a new thread

Your most favorite programming language:
Your least:

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stevech wrote:
we ought to have a new thread

Your most favorite programming language:
Your least:

You can create that thread, but, at least in my case, my favorite programming language depends upon the task at hand. I have different favorite languages for AVR programming, dynamic web page servering, text processing, numerical analysis, and rapid prototyping. I'm not sure how many people have a most favorite programming language.

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I suspect this will be true for many folks...

Your most favorite programming language: The one I'm using

Your least: The one I'm trying to learn

Languages really are like tools -- each has its own advantages and disadvantages, given the problem at hand.

Stu

Engineering seems to boil down to: Cheap. Fast. Good. Choose two. Sometimes choose only one.

Newbie? Be sure to read the thread Newbie? Start here!

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Well, the thread seems to be dying off now so Ill take this opportunity to thank those who have contributed.

From this I've learned one thing and relearned another:

    * This forum not only represents a massive amount of AVR knowledge, but an equally massive amount of general computing knowledge.

    *"Don't assume, it makes an ass of you and me." Or... the replies have shown the assumptions that I've made about some posters to be totally wide of the mark :)

Anyway "merry christmas" to you all.

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Hmm, I bet my list of programming languages is like this:

1) Basic on Commodore VIC-20 and PC
2) Maybe some LOGO programming on a school PC
3) Borland Turbo Pascal on PC
4) x86 assembly language on PC
5) C++ on some unix derivative
6) AVR assembly language
7) regular C on AVR, HC11 and HCS08 platforms
8) Modula-3 on some unix derivative (Solaris I think)

So nothing fancy, just for fun and just something that passes university courses. I didn't include DOS batch (.BAT) programming or unix shell scripts as I am not so used to them nowadays. No Java, Perl or Python, although I might have edited both Perl and Python programs so that they work better when someone has done the initial revision.

- Jani

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1998 Lego Mindstorms RCX (language "RCX Code") Does that count as a programming language? :lol:

1999 Basic for Sharp ZQ-750M(PDA/Organizer like)
2000 JAL (Just another Language http://jal.sourceforge.net/) on PIC16F84

2001 PicBasic, Basic for the PIC16F84
2001 Visual Basic / VBA
2002 Basic (Bascom (AVR))
2004 C - AVR-GCC / WinAVR
2005 PHP/MySQL

I've learned all of the above with books / internet / looking at examples etc. Basically learning by doing.
I never had the chance to learn something like that at school :( But maybe in university in 2 years :P

Merry christmas to all! :)

Nik

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Several assemblers (8080, PDP-11, VAX-11)
Fortran
A couple of years of BCPL somewhere at that same time
Many years of mostly C
Lately mostly C/Java/C#

Eugene Zharkov

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Wonderful thread guys! ...except for the fact that I'm realizing that quite a bunch of you have been programming before I was born :/

Started off with some flavour of basic on an Apple in my early/mid teens
A couple of years later I started non-spaghetti programming with Turbo Pascal
Then in Uni I did
C,
VHDL,
8086 assembly (a little),
8051 assembly (a bit more),
Matlab,
a whiff of Haskell and Prolog which I doubt I'll ever use in real life,
LabView (quite a cute thing),
more C (on an 8051 and on an ARM7),
and now that I'm away from school I've done some C on AVR.

I would like to do AVR assembly too when I stop staying late at work and re-start my hobbies (hopefully soon)

NxP

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Quote:

Then in Uni I did [...] VHDL

OK, so tell me what I should read to understand this behemoth of a language. (Specifically Xilinx Spartan3 devices and Xilinx ISE WEBpack development software if that helps).

Honestly. I'm struggling harder with this than John Samperi is with C...

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I beleive you, it's far from being trivial... and I was suicidal enough not to get a textbook (I thought that since it was a minor two-point subject it was not worth the time and money). I managed to get past the wierd exam using the even wierder and more disorganized notes I took in class and some simulation in the lab.

Unfortunately when I came to using VHDL the following summer as an intern doing some design work I had to unlearn quite a bit of it and re-learn it from a colleague. Tht's what happens when you can't dedicate yourself as much as you should to something

I can try to help you a bit and see if I can find some valid examples which I wrote, especially if you tell me what is bugging you most. I was using Spartan 3 with ISE just as you are, but had never gone to hardware (I was just working on the device's core and protocols, someone else did the flashing). In class we had much older software to synthesize and flash the hardware.

Just a few hints:
1: DO NOT use ISE to develop and learn VHDL. Use a package such as ModelSim or ActiveHDL - these permit you to simulate and learn how to code. You can also design your system and see it working and then you synthesize the same code using ISE.

2: If simulating remmeber that not all constructs and syntax elements can be synthesized to hardware. If you feel comfortable first coding a logical program and then a compilable program, by all means do it, but do not let it confuse you.

3: To simulate remember to create a "top level" containing a "signal generator", a "logic analyzer" module and your module. Generate the test signals for your module in the first with logical VHDL code (since this never needs to be compiled) and capture the output results with the second.

I think I am getting too far off topic, but if you need any assistance and feel we shouldn't discuss here just PM me.

NxP

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1975 - TI SR Calculator assembly language (I didn't know it was assembly language)
1978 - a little theoretical Fortran (never touched the keyboard)
1979 - Fortran WATV
1981 - BASIC on a PDP-11
1982?- Atari BASIC (I'm still pissed off that the Polar-rectangular program I wrote didn't save to cassette when my mother turned on the dryer and my sister turned on the hair dryer and we lost power :evil:)
1983 - Assembly language on the 6502 manually poked in via basic. :-) And 8080 manually entered hex via a hex pad on the 8080 SDK.
1985 - C on a Gimix Ghost with OS9, my first real multi-user/multi-tasking introduction.
1986 - Turbo C, Pascal, LISP on the Atari 800xl and PC. I hated the PC it just couldn't do what we could do on the 6809 Ghost! 6800, 6802, 6809 and 68HC11 assembly language & 8052 with BASIC.
1988 - Unix & networking on the Unix PC and 3B2. Shell and Ksh (I hated csh).
1989 - 1995 - Perl and AWK, expect and TCL.

After that point it becomes hazy as to what I was working with as far as languages and processors. I know I have worked with the Z80, x86 family, played with the 320xx, 680xx, the PICs, the AVRs, the 8051 family, ARM and MS products, Vaxen and various Unix and Linux. I've taken course in Pascal, C++, Java (I hate C++, I like Java) and Javascript (and this new langauge called HTML :shock:, oh I learned *roff with my Unix PC and 3B2). In 1998 I took a course on mainframe assembly language and was offered a job to help translate pre-Y2K programs to handle Y2K. I turned it down as they couldn't match my salary in computer and voice networking.

One problem with asking what language is that I wasn't just learning a language, it was electronics, algorithms, protocols, and a lot of other computer/electronic related subjects. I just happen to work in the fields that are my hobbies too (and I'm loving it). It's tough to keep up, when's the last time you used PUP, XNS or NCP (not Novell ;-) )? I guess I'm a jack-ASS of many trades and a master of none. ;-)

Since I wrote a book I've learned what I don't know about English and can't say that I know the language. :-)

Neil Cherry
Linux Home Automation
Author: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies.

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Ahh, memories...

1979: NASCOM BASIC
1980: SC/MP assembly on a MK14
1981: ZX81 Basic
1981: Z80 assembly
1982: FORTH
1984: Pascal, LISP, some Prolog, Modula-2
1985: 68000 assembly
1987: C
1987: ARM assembly
1988: 80x86 assembly
1994: C++
1995: Java
1999: AVR assembly
2000+ JavaScript, PHP, Bash, a little Perl
2000+ ARM assembly revived

Sean.

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