OT: Superbright LEDs

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Ok, this is more of an anecdode, but here I go...

A few months ago, I went to the Royal Melbourne Show here in Australia. The show was crap - and the showbags terrible value - but all the pretty lights forced me to buy a bag or two. One of the novelties was the ugliest purple Wonka hat in the world, which flashes courtesy of a single LED, flasher circuit and fiber optics. I prompty dissasembled the hat and placed the red LED into my circuit to act as an indicator. I forgot to switch the transistor's base resistor back to a 10k - it was a 1k - and thus I am now sitting here, half blind, with a giant Red spot in the middle of my eyes.

Don't know what people mean when they say LEDs will never take over globes.........

Has anyone else got some interesting anecdotes they want to share?

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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A little over a month ago there was an article in EE Times about a "super LED" that will be able to be used for headlights in cars. Apparently there has been a lot of progress in this area recently.

Dave

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I have a few that I use in flashlights. They will take up to 1 amp - Luxeon III from
http://elektrolumens.com/
An ATtiny26 makes a good dimmer circuit for them with the fast PWM.

Ralph Hilton

Last Edited: Fri. Nov 26, 2004 - 05:22 PM
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I hope you are joking about the red spot. These superbright LEDs can be as dangerous as Lasers and can damage vision. If the spot persists, see a doctor.

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Always take care that you don't damage your eyes when you are working with superflux Leds, superbright Leds and especially with lasers.

abcminiuser wrote:

Has anyone else got some interesting anecdotes they want to share?

- Dean :twisted:

I got an anecdote. A while ago (about 10 years) we went out with some friends and girlfriends for a happy night in a dancehall (or club whatever you call it). Booze, loud music, dancing people, everything.
I was admiring the breathtaking powerfull fullcolor lasershow. Marvellous.
Till a blue beam frontally hit my right eye very brief but with intense power. I felt a very sharp pain flash going from my eye till the back of my head. It felt like the beam went right through my head. And the only color I saw was blue. Very unpleasant. At that moment I thought this is it, I've lost my eye.

It took me 20 long mins to regain my sight. Fortunately. But I went home with a severe headache. Looking back at this fact I think I was extremely lucky because later I heard it was a 200mw( :!: ) argon laser with defoccused beams.

Totally irresponsible to use that kind of power where it can hit the audience.

abcminiuser wrote:
- and thus I am now sitting here, half blind, with a giant Red spot in the middle of my eyes
Dean, I know the feeling, maybe you can act a part in Terminator 4 :wink: :lol:

Regards,

- - big bang - -

Take a good look around. Admire our world, our galaxy, the whole universe. Then you just feel there must be a
'Theory of everything'

Maybe, someday, the human race is ready to discover it.

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On my board at work: "Do not look at laser with remaining eye"

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i just saw an article about this sort of thing in popular science. theyve been able to take somethin around 100 (guessing a bit on the number) surface mount LEDs and put em on a board with a reflective cover and it works as good as a regular lightbulb, uses very little power and will last something like 10 years. the down side is the cover had to have some rather large, and unsightly heatsinks on it to keep the thing cool. but still, it shows alot of promise.

The downside to being better than everyone else is that people tend to assume you're pretentious.

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Don't worry, i've put it down to an appropriate brightness, and I can reassure the massess that i'm not blind. The LED in question is not a Luxon Star (just a regular superbright waterclear RED one) and I happened to be looking at it from a close distance - I didn't expect it to work as the flasher unit dies withing 10 mins and so I had removed the LED fromt the circuit.

I have been reading up on the evilution of LEDs - including the Luxon Stars - with interest. Although I am not in need of a LED that can blind the masses, they certainly look promising for torches, low-voltage lighting, etc.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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There is a forum on the subject of LEDs, etc that may be of interest -
http://www.candlepowerforums.com...

Ralph Hilton

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LEDs aren't my primary interest. I just wanted a decent waterclear green LED for a project i'm doing - they have to be visible and of 5mm diameter (for industrial application), without blinding the user. My original interface design used bicolour (green = pump on, red = pump off, yellow = selected pump), but my employers throught that this would be "too difficult" for the final design....

I have a few ports left over, perhaps I should implement some self-checking routines to make sure the pumps don't kill the output mosfets.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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If you are worried about the MosFets being killed by the item they are switching have a look at the ST range of Omni FETs. These seem to be turning out to be reliable and the lowest cost ones around with self protection.

Keep it simple it will not bite as hard