Open Source Piconomix FW Library, quick start guides, tutorials, examples, best practices

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#1
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Hi everyone,

 

I have upgraded the Piconomic FW Library to the next level. It contains an extensive framework so that you can quickly develop new applications, an Atmel AVR quick start guide, tutorials, examples and quick start guides:

 

I have also developed the Atmel ATmega328P Scorpion Board as the ideal companion. The killer app is a CLI (Command-line interpreter) application that runs on the Atmel ATmega328P. It allows you to hook up a device and experiment with GPIO, SPI, I2C and UART without writing a line of C code. There is also simple, but robust record-based filesystem for AT45D DataFlash called log_fs that I worked really hard on and am proud of. There is a analog voltage data logger and temp&humidity data logger that demonstrates log_fs.

 

Please check it out and let me know your thoughts.

 

Thanks,

Pieter

Last Edited: Tue. Mar 7, 2017 - 01:30 PM
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I voted "maybe" - I guess it's not bad for $20 but you are up against all the Arduino clones of this world. (some of which can be had for quite a lot less than $20).

 

Is there something to this that you think makes it stand above Arduino?

Last Edited: Fri. Jan 23, 2015 - 03:27 PM
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Hi clawson,

 

Thank you for taking the time to send me honest feedback. I really appreciate it! Yes, I agree that it is going to be a tough uphill battle with the king at the top (Arduino) and the cheap clone prices. My value proposition is the built-in data logging capability with DataFlash, human interaction (LED, Button, Buzzer) and easy way to wire up different devices (GPIO, I2C, SPI and / or UART) with lots of GND and +3V3 pins to avoid EMI issues. The CLI app to experiment with a device is really cool and afterwards, you can turn it into actual C code quickly. I have tried to design the library to be portable so that you will not be stuck with one specific vendor.

 

It already received a very nice review and I think it nailed my sentiment exactly:

http://www.embedds.com/feature-r...

 

I hoped that some of the Arduino users would want to graduate to "lean-and-mean" C code with a properly abstracted framework and I could help to make that transition quicker.

 

Best regards,

Pieter

 

Last Edited: Wed. Jan 28, 2015 - 08:49 AM
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Good luck!

 

I agree that to add those extra facilities to a "plain Arduino" probably brings you into the same cost ball-park anyway so I guess it depends if the users are looking for those facilities in particular. But sadly I fear Arduino has achieved "critical mass". Your code libraries may be the best in the world but if I want to find 50 other people who know how to get the Arduino LCD library (say) I'm trying to use to work I know where I'll find them. It's quite tricky to get something so popular that support for almost anything you might want to do is almost guaranteed.

 

But the world would be a sad place if one design/company ruled everything (now why did I just think of Intel, Microsoft and Apple?).