One for the analog engineers

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#1
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I'm a major YouTube fan, perhaps watch 2..3 hours each day. It pushes ideas based on what it knows are my interests. Sometimes it gets things a little wrong like this.. 

 

https://youtu.be/GVsUOuSjvcg

 

But I must say I was intrigued by this anyway. The product he's showing is

 

https://the-analog-thing.org/

 

 

Someone else will know if €299 is a "good price" but it looks like a lot of fun. (obviously reminds me a lot of modular synthesizers, CV voltages etc) 

 

Also reminds me of an ETI project I got all the bits for but never built about 40 years ago which was an analog computer based "moon lander" game. 

Last Edited: Fri. Mar 4, 2022 - 10:29 PM
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Haha, I saw that video 2-3 days back. The guy has really interesting videos.

 

The analog thing could be like arduino for analog people. smiley

“Everyone knows that debugging is twice as hard as writing a program in the first place. So if you're as clever as you can be when you write it, how will you ever debug it?” - Brian W. Kernighan
“Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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I remember using an "analog computer" back in university lab courses to model/solve differential equations.  THAT pushes my nostalgia button. laugh

Letting the smoke out since 1978

 

 

 

 

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Analog computer was a monster with huge boxes, each doing something like Integrator, derivator, attenuator (it was just a pot)... a science of passed times.

 

From this days I remember only a cute 's' operators (Laplace transformations).

 

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An RC circuit solves the differential equation very effectively!  3rd order anyone? 5th?  Where's Bessel?

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Fri. Mar 4, 2022 - 11:26 PM
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avrcandies wrote:
Where's Bessel?

 

Not here. It does acts on audio and RF spectrum, for decomposition of wave-forms. There is also a Bessel filter, can be realized by an OP amp.

 

Analog computer is important in Analogue world of chemical production, for example.

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Oddly enough, I had the same video thrown at me a couple of days ago too - though it was not such a surprise since I'm a subscriber of his.

 

Apropos of nothing but old age, the first computer I saw was an analog computer: a couple of nineteen inch racks full of valve op-amps and lots of plug boards and meters...

 

Neil

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Examples of Transfer function. In analogue world, everything electric is considered as a box, two inputs, two outputs. Two, because the current will not go to a single wire. Note Laplace operator 's' here. In computer, it can get forms 's square', computer transfer formula is much more complicate.

 

 

 

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Summers, yes.  Winters?  Not so much!  devil  S.

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Oh boy, the breadboard neatness police are going to have a field day with that! laugh

 

 

EDIT: But then again ..... surprise

 

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
  • No, I do not believe in software or intellectual property piracy or theft
Last Edited: Sat. Mar 5, 2022 - 09:05 AM
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(Do not cheat...) It should be a phone exchange!

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grohote wrote:

(Do not cheat...) It should be a phone exchange!

 

That is a screen capture from the video on Rosenblatt that Cliff posted in #1.

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
  • No, I do not believe in software or intellectual property piracy or theft
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This is a pair of painted circuit boards with a lot of jacks, a row of rugged pots, an a 7-segment LCD display.  Internally there are, I estimate, four quad-op-amp IC packages.

 

Fifty years ago, you would have found schools that would pay $350 US (300 Euros: 250 UKP) for this kind of thing.  But now I can't imagine anyone paying more than $20 US for this.  Electronics students generally get the "bread-board" white-plastic press-in-component-leads , 0.1" rows to do testing with.

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Missile guidance was 'improved' with a desk size mechanical calculating /analog/ device with a gears of every size and shape.

I was admiring one such II-ww navy surplus in a dump-yard.

 

Analogue computers are post II-w invention, as Simonetta said their value was dropped because of modern computing techniques.

 

Yet, all we can admire the 1st /analogue/ computer known in history, the Antikythera one. It was a real marvel of technology... just to calculate the horoscope.

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grohote wrote:
just to calculate the horoscope.

 

Well, it's possible that it had one or two other functions :)

 

A gent working as 'Clickspring' presents a project to build a replica using - as far as he can tell - original techniques and tools. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=...

 

Neil

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Simonetta wrote:
But now I can't imagine anyone paying more than $20 US for this.
Then I'm guessing you've never heard of Eurorack where very similar (often analog) modules sell for anything from £50 to £100s?..

 

https://www.andertons.co.uk/keyboards-pianos/synths-workstations/modular-synths/eurorack-modules#facet:&productBeginIndex:0&facetLimit:&orderBy:&pageView:grid&minPrice:&maxPrice:&pageSize:&

 

Perhaps an extreme example but... 

 

https://www.andertons.co.uk/keyboards-pianos/synths-workstations/modular-synths/intellijel-rainmaker-16-tap-stereo-spectral-rhythm-delay-and-comb-resonator

 

Last Edited: Sat. Mar 5, 2022 - 03:06 PM
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Here is a link to HackaDay featuring a short article about THAT (The Analog Thing) running a simulator of a Lorenz attractor being plotted by an XY plotter.

 

https://hackaday.com/2021/10/03/forget-digital-computing-you-need-an-analog-computer/

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
  • No, I do not believe in software or intellectual property piracy or theft
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clawson wrote:

Simonetta wrote:
But now I can't imagine anyone paying more than $20 US for this.

 

Then I'm guessing you've never heard of Eurorack where very similar (often analog) modules sell for anything from £50 to £100s?..

 

Operative point being "A row of rugged pots".  Good knobs aren't cheap (and stop sniggering, you Britlanders!).  S.

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grohote wrote:
Missile guidance was 'improved' with a desk size mechanical calculating /analog/ device with a gears of every size and shape.
After Vietnam War the Digital more easy.

www.tokopedia.com/madagang .Buy and Donated cheap electronics and manuscripts.

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WayneZA wrote:
Oh boy, the breadboard neatness police are going to have a field day with that! laugh

The university I attended was on an old military base, the CS department had the Analog computer left behind when the military left, it had racks of tube based diff amp, and the programming plates looked similar to your board above, just a bunch of holes that you put patch cords into and then inserted the card into the computer matrix slot.  The computer was used to come up with artillery settings to hit a target. 

The room that housed it had a wall of glass for the gunnery target crew to observe the results and a single door, that had to remain closed to maintain the rooms temperature during operation.

The school would fire it up to demo it (it took several hours for it to warm up and stabilize), but we used a solid state computer similar to the one above for class room assignments.  Fun days, but an education wasted as I've never used anything like it since.....

 

flyover Jim

 

FF = PI > S.E.T

 

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WayneZA wrote:
Oh boy, the breadboard neatness police are going to have a field day with that!
Another one for your collection:

 

 

Andre Huang (quite famous for synth stuff on YouTube) has one of the maddest Eurorack Modular synth setups ever and the above is just part of one "patch" !

 

It's even more fun when it gets dark...

 

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My compsci instructor grading the students work!

 

FF = PI > S.E.T

 

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grohote wrote:
Analog computer is important in Analogue world of chemical production, for example.
... and aircraft though an aviator/pilot is required to recover from the corner cases.

High pucker factor smiley

SR-71 Blackbird ‘Unstart’ Over Murmansk | Historynet

by Thomas M. Cleaver

6/26/2017

[1/4 page]

The SR-71’s right engine had just experienced an “intake unstart.”

...

As pressure builds inside the inlet, bleed tubes and bypass doors open to handle it and position the final shock wave so the inlet remains “started.”Air compressed by the interaction of inlet and shock wave is then diverted directly into the afterburner, where it is mixed with fuel and burned in what is essentially a ramjet, providing up to 70 percent of the aircraft’s thrust at speed.

 

But if internal pressures inside the J58 intake become too great, the shock wave suddenly blows out the front of the inlet. During an intake unstart, the computer controlling the spike records the lack of pressure and responds by moving the spike forward to the subsonic flight position. Airflow immediately stops, thrust drops and exhaust gas temperatures rise.

 

In the front cockpit, [pilot Joseph E.] Matthews knew their only hope of avoiding disaster was to unstart the left engine, then attempt a manual midair restart of both.

[left engine intake unstart]

[manual restart by cycling auto-restart switch]

 

[1/3 page]

The crew of 974 was not the first to experience an intake unstart, but no one could understand how this particular mishap occurred. The SR-71 had originally been equipped with an analog computer, and it was possible for the environmental inputs to get ahead of the controls, which would cause an overload and shut down the spike. The early computers were later replaced with digital models, but the unstart problem persisted.

 

...

Over the Baltic the SR-71 would be limited to a maximum speed of Mach 2.8 as it made banking turns with the wings canted 45 degrees— sharp and steep for an SR-71—to remain within the confines of international airspace. Because the inlets were not optimized for Mach 2.8 flight, unstarts were not uncommon in this situation.

 

Again 974 approached the reconnaissance track at 83,000 feet. As Matthews brought the aircraft up to speed for the run once more, they again lost the spike on the right engine. This time he managed to effect an auto-restart, but they had to abort the mission a second time.

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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WayneZA wrote:
Oh boy, the breadboard neatness police are going to have a field day with that! laugh
not (Pease "air ball")

Audio impedance is greater than free space impedance (single layer PCB for cost saving)

MCU are handy for control paths to the analog data paths (Cypress PSoCTM, AVR DB)

 


What’s All This Pease Prototype Stuff, Anyhow? | Electronic Design

 

Single-layer Boards | AVR040: EMC Design Considerations

PSoCâ„¢ 3 - Infineon Technologies

Analog Applications in 8-bit PIC® and AVR® Microcontrollers

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:
and aircraft

 

It happens to me to see what rest of an aircraft, or copter:

a sheet with Or, And, Inv, D-flop /forgot the rest/ elements ... based on air flow only. Pneumatic.

 

It should be a 'digital' system, is it?

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http://www.orbem.co.uk/cr62/cr62... might amuse: think about how many ways there are of inserting jacks into the jackfields mentioned. I've worked in apparatus rooms - Broadcasting House in the analogue days - with hundreds of bays full of racks of jackfields. Every jack (except insert jacks) goes back to a Krone frame or in older cases, Christmas tree frames, and the default circuits hard wired on the frames. The documentation on the frames was, um, complex. But complete.

 

And everything in twisted copper pairs, tens to hundreds of metres long. How we used to smile fondly at the audiophools and their gold-plated cables...

 

Neil

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I know this is simply a targeted advert but this popped up in my Twitter feed a few minutes ago... 

 

https://t.co/TybKP4yexR

 

Introducing Spintronics - a new puzzle game where players explore electronics in a tangible way, by building MECHANICAL circuits. In the process, discover the fun of electronics without any, well, electronics! See it here: https://t.co/50lCrGN1Tr

 

So it's a step beyond "analog" all the way to "mechanical"! 

 

(must be fun being a kid in the 20's!)

Last Edited: Tue. Mar 8, 2022 - 12:34 AM
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Someone else will know if €299 is a "good price" but it looks like a lot of fun

Five integrators, two multipliers, relays to set initial conditions. Good to two decimal places. Fair amount of I/O. It's probably not a bad price.  

 

At uni (about 45 years ago), we had to simulate "balancing a broomstick on a cart" on an analog computer. I might even still have the chart-recorder printouts somewhere.

 

Mike

When you're used to privilege, equality feels like oppression. / Malena Ernman

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Here's a snaller, home-brew version:  http://www.analogmuseum.org/engl...

 

 

 

Mike

When you're used to privilege, equality feels like oppression. / Malena Ernman

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grohote wrote:
Analog computer is important in Analogue world of chemical production, for example.

yes Where's the info's ?

www.tokopedia.com/madagang .Buy and Donated cheap electronics and manuscripts.

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On the 6th semester, I got this info in "Analogue techniques" study.

 

FYI, the main difference between Analogue and Digital is: Digital does have values 0 and 1, analogue does have 0 to 1 as a fine-scale.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Edited: Tue. Mar 8, 2022 - 04:10 PM