Oldest and current selling IC?

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#1
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My guess it that the oldest IC still in production is the 555 timer from 1971. Anyone else have an idea?

Here's a link to the oral history of the 555.
http://semiconductormuseum.com/T...

Tom

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This page says that the 741 was introduced in 1968. Isn't that one still in production?
http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/gadgets/741/741.html

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Another thought, you can still buy a plain 74xx TTL, which were introduced in 1962 according to:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transistor%E2%80%93transistor_logic

At least the name/number lives on, but the ICs might have been modified over the years - I dont' know.

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The ua709 came before the 741, and is still around. I remember RTL logic devices becoming available in the '60s, but I've always been under the impression the 709 was the first mass produced IC.

Tom Pappano
Tulsa, Oklahoma

Tom Pappano
Tulsa, Oklahoma

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The Wiki is wrong about TTL - the 54 mil-spec series was first introduced in 1964, but AFAIK it was a restricted military technology and not available to the public as the plastic 7400 series until 1966. I'll go with the 709.

Lots of historic details at Andrew Wylie's IC site and lots more at his other site, Mr Transistor's Historic Web Pages.

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Quote:
The Wiki is wrong about TTL - the 54 mil-spec series was first introduced in 1964, but AFAIK it was a restricted military technology and not available to the public as the plastic 7400 series until 1966.

The first TTL chips I got my hands on were 54xx devices in tiny little gold plated metal flat packs in 1970. These things must have been around awhile to have become available surplus.

Tom Pappano
Tulsa, Oklahoma

Tom Pappano
Tulsa, Oklahoma

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Didn't the CA3080 arrive before the 709 and 741?

It seems that Intersil have recently slated it for obsolescence after 38 years, although it looks like NJM still make it. This would have to make it a serious contender, if we are talking about straight drop-ins and not family or functional derivatives.

Speaking of Hot Old Silicon, I remember working with an old Harris (now Intersil) bit-slice although I can't find any references to it. I think it was a X300, X600, or something very similar. I'm pretty sure this was before the AMD2900, but I can't find any references to it. Does anyone else remember this slice ?

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Quote:
The first TTL chips I got my hands on were 54xx devices in tiny little gold plated metal flat packs in 1970.

This kind of package? From the screw holes it looks like you could mount them in the green plastic carrier, though I never saw anything assembled that way.

The package was developed, I think, for the Minuteman missile guidance computer and other space applications. These were not "surface mount" packages in the sense that we understand it. They weren't for soldering down to a PCB. The circuits were assembled by spot-welding wires to the component leads, hence the generous lead length.

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Quote:
This kind of package?

Yep! Those are the ones! I'll bet the plastic carrier is molded to suit automatic testing equipment.

Tom Pappano
Tulsa, Oklahoma

Tom Pappano
Tulsa, Oklahoma