Nice springbreak wireless hack, even though its a PIC

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Subtract 10 "coolness points" for using a 16F84 instead of a 16F628a.

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Pfft. That's nothing. Take a look at some MIT student's disco dance floor:

http://web.mit.edu/storborg/ddf/

In the Design page, they mention they use an "Atmel microcontroller", though they don't specifically say which one.

They also got a mention on Slashdot a little while back.

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Pfft, nothing? I think its exactly what it is, a nice little weekend hack. And it exposes tons more people to taking the plunge into uC's, as compared to the Disco dance floor with 20k solder points, which probably doesn't.

AVR may be better in most ways, however its little gadgets like this which probably pull more people in to PIC.

EW wrote:
Pfft. That's nothing. Take a look at some MIT student's disco dance floor:

http://web.mit.edu/storborg/ddf/

In the Design page, they mention they use an "Atmel microcontroller", though they don't specifically say which one.

They also got a mention on Slashdot a little while back.

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wish we had more stuff like that in our projects section small fun projects with code and hardware descriptions that could be very useful to other people trying to do similar things

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If you want an AVR instead (and who doesn't in this forum), then I have this old project here:
http://www.ejberg.dk/ledfade2/

It isn't wireless. Rather a stand-alone device. But it is quite cool to look at.

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Nice project Svuppe. Well documented and a pleasure to read.

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With regard to "wish we had more of these projects here," I'm actually intrigued by seeing these PIC projects -- this, and a lot of the propeller-clock projects I've seen use PICs, but I took the plunge into AVR development and I'm going to stick with it. So, I'm planning to adapt the schematics and code to run off comparable AVR chips when I build my versions of both this summer. I find trying to take the code and design for the PIC platform and translate it into AVR helps me understand what's going on in a more useful way than if I just copied the schematics and code completely for a PIC. I'll try to keep notes on what I come up with and post them here, but I'm notoriously bad with documentation beyond what I need for my own memory-jogging. I'll give it a shot, at least.