Nice Opensource CSS/CVS Revisioncontrol System

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This really seems like a nice CSS/CVS

Snipped from "The Muse" (J. Gansle)

Now you can get control (for free) of your subversions , on your own pc (standalone mode) or a whole department.

Quote:

Note on a VCS
-------------
Simon Large wrote in with some interesting comments about an open source
version control system:

In my previous company I used Visual SourceSafe (VSS) all the time. When I
changed jobs, the new company (managed by mechanical engineers) could not
accept that a VCS was better than using WinZip periodically, and would not
pay. As a result, I trawled around the open source sites and came across
Subversion. This project was started in around 2000 as a replacement for
the ageing CVS system widely used by the open source community, but rather
limited in scope. You can read the history for yourself on their site, but
it is now widely deployed and seems well regarded.

Many of the enhancements over CVS also apply with regard to VSS, but in
particular:
* Atomic commits - A change often involves several files. In this system
you check them all in together in one operation with a single log message.
If any file fails, the whole commit fails, so you don't end up with the
repository in a half-changed state.

* Ported to many OSes - The server component is based on the Apache web
server and will run on a wide variety of machines. Likewise the client.

* Flexibility - You can also use the client standalone on a local PC; or
several clients on a network share; or you can set up a server and access
over LAN or the Internet using Apache's security.

* Works with large databases - VSS is notorious for database corruption
when the number of files rises. Subversion is being used to store multi
Gigabyte projects (not embedded!!!)

* Free! - VSS costs around $300 per user, and if you want to use it over
the internet you need something like SourceOffsite, also around $300.
Perforce is also highly regarded, but costs around $750 per user (although
to be fair you can use Perforce for free, but restricted to 2 users and 2
working directories).

* Support - There is an active mailing list and you get good technical info
quickly (unlike many mailing lists where you just get "this product is
cool/this product sucks" with zero information content).

Although it is open source, most users never see the source - you just
download the precompiled binaries and install.

The standard client is a command line interface, but of particular interest
to Windows users is the TortoiseSVN client. This integrates into Windows
explorer as a shell extension and you get VCS instantly in your right mouse
context menu. It is very easy to use and the documentation is excellent (I
have to say that because, like Victor Kiam, I was so impressed I joined the
TSVN project). If you don't need the server component, TSVN is all you need
to download.

Also of interest to you, project rules which govern how changes are made to
the project code and documentation are a model of good software practice.
ALL changes are reviewed by the development team, and they are really picky
about quality of comments as well as the code itself.

This has come across as more of a sales pitch than I originally intended,
but when I see a good product which can be of real help to other engineers
I like to tell them about it.

The main subversion website is at http://subversion.tigris.org

The TortoiseSVN (Windows client) is at http://tortoisesvn.tigris.org

/Bingo

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This thread is a little off-topic, but....

Subversion is just one open source Revision Control System (RCS). It's still relatively new and not as widely tested.

The RCS that is widely used in Open Source projects is Concurrent Versions System or CVS. CVS is also open source as well. You can find CVS software clients on just about all platforms (Unix, Linux, Windows, Mac, even with Cygwin, etc.).

I would suggest learning some CVS first to get a handle on the different approach it takes to RCS then Visual SourceSafe. A good reference is this free online book:

http://cvsbook.red-bean.com/cvsbook.html

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and don't forget the wincvs client for cvs

Jonathan

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Welll maybe this belonged to the Community forum. But i was thinking that many home/hobby users might wanted the ability to "go back" to last working revision , so i posted it here.

I will post announcements in Community forum next time

I have had the pleasure :wink: of using CVS and even the old RCSS (as standalone) , and i was thinking that this might be a nice one for the little man , not requiring servers.

/Bingo

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I use CVS that comes with Cygwin, and no servers are needed if the repository is on my local machine.

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Actually, no server is needed for SubVersion either if it is locally hosted. That's how I am using it currently. I have used CVS some but my brief exposure to SubVersion has me liking it better than CVS.

Don Kinzer
ZBasic Microcontrollers
http://www.zbasic.net

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I just ran accross this thread and thought I'd comment.

Subversion is being developed as the replacement to CVS. Look around a little bit and you'll see more and more open source projects moving to subversion. Only problem with subversion is the lack of good front ends for it.

As far as usability, atomic comits (commiting ALL files or NO files) are the deciding factor for me. I can't even think about using CVS in a distributed environment, since a network/internet glitch could leave the repository in a half updated state.

Just .02 :wink:

John Holcomb

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Fine. Now convince SourceForge and Savannah, the two largest public repositories of open source/free software, to use it.

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For Savannah, you won't have problems convincing them, as Subversions
is a GNU project, so they're open for it. ;-)

Still, little experience of the developer community, and a general
distrust to new products in a sensitive area like revision control is
probably the major limiting factor for better acceptance by now. We
do know the bugs and rough edges of CVS pretty well, the problems
Subversions might encounter are yet unknown. ;-)

Jörg Wunsch

Please don't send me PMs, use email if you want to approach me personally.

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As far as a large open source project switching to subversion...

Samba:
http://us1.samba.org/samba/devel/

Xiph.org(ogg vorbis):
http://www.xiph.org/svn.html

All I'm saying is that the change will take place over time, so why not just get ahead of the game.

Only my .02, everyone's opinion is different. :wink:

John Holcomb

Last Edited: Thu. Mar 10, 2005 - 04:11 PM
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At work, we spent some months evaluating Subversion as a replacement for our existing revision control system, and we recommended its adoption - it did everything we wanted and more.

We are pretty heavy users of our revision control system, using branching and merging on a frequent basis, and had migrated a major project over to Subversion and run it for several months with no problems (unlike our existing RCS, whose brnach/merge capability is spotty at best).

Unfortunately, another part of the company wanted to use AlienBrain, so in the interests of consistency we will be using that.

However, I still use Subversion at home, as it is free, and the Tortoise front end works pretty well in Windows Explorer.

Sean.

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Ok, I'm using CVS at home and work... Windows and Linux... Local and Network...
Has for a front-end lincvs. Works under Windows (my work OS) and for Linux (my personnal best OS).
I use also emacs has a front-end (my editor) but I still need lincvs to manage all the tags, releases and the diff tool it's quite good.

You can start using CVS with little effort but if you want to learn about doing right you must read "Pragmatic Version Control". Talks about CVS but covers others also...

https://www.cvshome.org/docs/man...