Newbie programming board jumper question

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I bought a little PCB to connect an Atmeag328 inb a ZIF socket to my programmer and it has 3 jumpers. Two are on the external crystal wires, to disable it, and one is from pin 2 of the 10 pin header socket for the programmer cable to pin 16 of the Atmega328. can anyone tell me what this jumper may do please? Thanks

Best regards, Chris Wilson

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Please post a picture of your ZIF adapter, or a schematic, or at least a link to where this was found, I'm thinking this may not be intended as an AVR programming adapter! 

 

Jim

 

 

FF = PI > S.E.T

 

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It's probably for using another brand/model, just ignore the jumper...programming only requires chip connections to gnd, Vcc, mosi, miso, sck, and reset on the chip  (assuming the clock is still set for internal RC).

What PROGRAMMER are you using?

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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avrcandies wrote:

It's probably for using another brand/model, just ignore the jumper...

That is a big assumption, what about the rest of the circuitry that may be on the ZIF adapter?

avrcandies wrote:
What PROGRAMMER are you using?
From one of MrBasil's previous threads https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/i-can-update-existing-firmware-328-pu-not-write-it-new-one

Using a cheap Ebay USBasp

​MrBasil still needs to provide the info that Jim asked for;

 

ki0bk wrote:
Please post a picture of your ZIF adapter, or a schematic, or at least a link to where this was found, I'm thinking this may not be intended as an AVR programming adapter! 

 

Jim

"I may make you feel but I can't make you think" - Jethro Tull - Thick As A Brick

"void transmigratus(void) {transmigratus();} // recursio infinitus" - larryvc

"It's much more practical to rely on the processing powers of the real debugger, i.e. the one between the keyboard and chair." - JW wek3

"When you arise in the morning think of what a privilege it is to be alive: to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love." -  Marcus Aurelius

Last Edited: Tue. Jan 30, 2018 - 07:10 PM
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what about the rest of the circuitry

Assuming it is just a ZIF, some jumper(s) & one-to-one pins....no "circuit"   ...YES, a pic or link would help.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Thanks for the replies, here is a link to the instructions and they contain photos and a schematic:

 

http://rocket.payload.free.fr/Do...

Best regards, Chris Wilson

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MrBasil wrote:

Thanks for the replies, here is a link to the instructions and they contain photos and a schematic:

 

http://rocket.payload.free.fr/Download/AVRadapter/ATMega328%20AVR%20adapter%20kit%20building%20instructions-02-10-2013-eng.pdf

So the mysterious jumper isn't on pin 2 at all.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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The schematic

 

"I may make you feel but I can't make you think" - Jethro Tull - Thick As A Brick

"void transmigratus(void) {transmigratus();} // recursio infinitus" - larryvc

"It's much more practical to rely on the processing powers of the real debugger, i.e. the one between the keyboard and chair." - JW wek3

"When you arise in the morning think of what a privilege it is to be alive: to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love." -  Marcus Aurelius

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I am sitting in McDonald's and on my phone so I might be wrong but, IIRC, pin 8 was a signal the programmer set to signify that it was about to start programming.

So boards used to drive an led, some used it to drive a multiplexer to swap pin function, and some simply ignored it.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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Brian Fairchild wrote:

I am sitting in McDonald's and on my phone so I might be wrong but, IIRC, pin 8 was a signal the programmer set to signify that it was about to start programming.

So boards used to drive an led, some used it to drive a multiplexer to swap pin function, and some simply ignored it.

You are probably correct.  Pin 8 matches up with a NC on pin 3 of a 10 pin ISP cable.  So is the answer in this case simply ignore?  Late here, off to bed.  Do you really eat there?

 

"I may make you feel but I can't make you think" - Jethro Tull - Thick As A Brick

"void transmigratus(void) {transmigratus();} // recursio infinitus" - larryvc

"It's much more practical to rely on the processing powers of the real debugger, i.e. the one between the keyboard and chair." - JW wek3

"When you arise in the morning think of what a privilege it is to be alive: to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love." -  Marcus Aurelius

Last Edited: Thu. Feb 1, 2018 - 08:37 AM
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I am not at a PC. But from memory, pin#1 of a 10-pin ISP header as used by STK500 or USBASP is MOSI. Pin #2 is VCC.
It looks as if the numbering scheme on CON1 is not following convention.
On a ribbon cable pin #1 has a red line and the connector has a triangle or arrow.
A shrouded header has a triangle. A pcb has a square pad. Sometimes a printed 1 or dot.
.
Of course Indian manufacturers do things their own way. Every other country follows the world convention.
.
David.

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from the freaks (may not be someone' offbeat version)

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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MrBasil wrote:
can anyone tell me what this jumper may do please?

Surely, Boris du Reau could?

 

He even invites you, "contact me": http://rocket.payload.free.fr/index.php?option=com_contact&view=contact&id=1&Itemid=5&lang=en

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Brian Fairchild wrote:
MrBasil wrote:

Thanks for the replies, here is a link to the instructions and they contain photos and a schematic:

 

http://rocket.payload.free.fr/Do...

So the mysterious jumper isn't on pin 2 at all.

 

Sorry, I had wrongly assumed the same pin numbering conventions would be used for the 10 pin header as the Atmega and normal IC's, I hadn't noticed it jumped side to side.

 

So by the "side to side" numbering the jumper is on the line between pin 16 of the Atmega and pin 8 of the programmer header.

Best regards, Chris Wilson

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Chip pin numbers are determined by the datasheet.

For connectors, it may very well be determined by you, as it is somewhat less standardized.

If you have a 13 pin circular connector, the website might just show 13 pins and no numbers at all...could pick any pin and call it pin 1 & number them in some bizzard sequence.

Headers usually thought in terms of odd/even rows, but not everyone does.  At least D-connectors have a pretty firm numbering. 

 

For other parts, it is also not always 100% standardized (or perhaps some just ignore a standard)

One company may label a sot-23 pins 1,2,3 in different position's than another company's pins 3, 2, 1

 

Confusing top vs bottom, front vs rear view always makes things exciting.

PCB designers love all the fun this causes, many decide to become Artic explorers.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!