new STK500 questions (sorry if wrong forum)

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I just got an STK500 and I just have a few questions:

1. It does not come with a power supply (weird) and I ended up finding a wall-wart that was 10V/1A and happened to be the right size. The STK500 manuel said, "500mA min."

I assume that the minimum amperage is 500ma. SO is 1A ok?

2. How can I add the avr dragon (when I get it eventually) to the stk 500? I have seen NO guides on how to make the avr dragon an expansion.... -_-

3. Are there any good tuts on the STK500 specifically? I have found the pdf doc. for it VERY helpful, but would like to find more.

Any help is MUCH appreciated.

Thanks,
Twist.

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Chuck Baird, one of our nicer contributors has a book on getting started with the STK500 - Arnie Aardvark's AVR Apercu (really) at: http://www.lulu.com/content/pape...

Chuck hangs out here so reading his book first, then asking questions is about as good an STK500 tutorial as you can find.

Smiley

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twist2b wrote:

1. It does not come with a power supply (weird) and I ended up finding a wall-wart that was 10V/1A and happened to be the right size. The STK500 manuel said, "500mA min."

I assume that the minimum amperage is 500ma. SO is 1A ok?

10-15V DC power supply, 500mA min

High cost performance Fast International shipping
--- Chinics Electronics Online Distribution with Wholesale Price
www.chinics.com

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Chinics-engineer wrote:
twist2b wrote:

1. It does not come with a power supply (weird) and I ended up finding a wall-wart that was 10V/1A and happened to be the right size. The STK500 manuel said, "500mA min."

I assume that the minimum amperage is 500ma. SO is 1A ok?

10-15V DC power supply, 500mA min

RIght, I just want to make sure "min" means minimum. Is 1A ok? Or do I have to find a 500mA wall-wart?

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A 1 amp wall wart is fine. You just need one that is rated at 500 mA minimum.

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To keep things cool I use 9Vdc regulated (1A in my case) but the current rating really depends on what you intend to do with the STK500, which on it's own, should not use more than about 100mA, the rest is for your circuit.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

https://www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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twist2b wrote:
2. How can I add the avr dragon (when I get it eventually) to the stk 500? I have seen NO guides on how to make the avr dragon an expansion.... -_-
The information is in the Dragon documentation.

The Dragon documentation can be found in AVR Studio or at http://support.atmel.no/knowledg...

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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1 amp wall wart is fine.

High cost performance Fast International shipping
--- Chinics Electronics Online Distribution with Wholesale Price
www.chinics.com

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Thanks a TON guys! Your help is MUCHO appreciated.

I have one last question:

The Atmega8515L that comes with the STK500 is no longer working. I haven't changed anything except programming. (.hex files) It won't read the chip or anything. I want to just move to another chip since it seems a common problem (Though I have not found the solution yet) but I can't get the damn chip out of the socket, its to much in there!

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Using a flathead screw driver very carefull insert between the chip and the socket on the short sides, weedle it about a bit - very carefully - then do the other side. It is an art to get the chip out without bending the legs and the legs can only be bent/straightened a couple of time before they break. Good luck.

Smiley

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It is impossible to kill an 8515 in a STK500 with ISP programming.

Apart from the Internal RC oscillator clock modes, the STK500 always provides a clock to XTAL1.

It all comes down to losing the STK500 clock source:

1. removing XTAL1 jumper
2. setting the CKSEL jumper for a crystal oscillator without a crystal.
3. setting the software clock frequency to 0kHz.

I would put money on you having done (3). Go to the STK500 menu in Studio, set the clock frequency to 3.68MHz or whatever and write it.

So fix the clock, write correct clock fuses and your 8515 will come alive.

Re removing a chip. Take Cliff's tip: Whenever you install a card in a PC you get a spare blanking plate.
This is ideal for gently levering each end of the 8515 until free. (far safer than a penknife or screwdriver)

David.

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You can resurrect the 8515 by HV Parallel programming it. Unless the 8515 is bricked beyond HV Parellel works every time to cure the ill's.

Jim

Edit:
Smileymicros is right, Chuck is one of the nicer members!!

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Back in my Heat-Kit "Master Builder" days, they gave me a cute little IC extractor. It's really nothing more then a 1/8" X 1-3/8" piece of metal bent at 90 degrees at about 1/4" from one end. The short end is beveled so that it slides nicely between the IC socket and the IC, itself.

Simply slide the extractor between the two and gently apply angular force - first on one end of the IC, then on the other end of the IC. Cycle back & forth between ends a few times, and the IC lifts out of the IC socket, without a hitch.

This cute little device can be easily made from some scrap sheet metal. It's been a real handy device over the years.

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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For IC extraction I've generally always used one of these:

Everyone has some of these in a draw and the short end (where the screw usually holds the plate in place) is easily slipped under one end of an IC then the long bit gives you plenty of leverage.

Cliff

PS Just in case anyone has been living in a cave for the last 20 years: that is a blanking plate for an ISA expansion slot in a PC.

PPS they are also great as a letter opener ;-)

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Stuff like this is invaluable for any PCB operation, including removal of ICs:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI...

Alternatively, could ask your dentist for old, used ones (shudder).

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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Actually since those are sterile cleaned each time, I wouldn't mind how used they were. There is precious littl, as clean as a dentist tool.

Code, justify, code - Pitr Dubovich

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Eloque wrote:
Actually since those are sterile cleaned each time, I wouldn't mind how used they were. There is precious littl, as clean as a dentist tool.
It is more the psychological effect. I have no problem that a dentists works in my mouth with tools which have been in thousands of other mouths. But for whatever reason I have to shudder when thinking about working on a PCB with a tool which was in thousands of mouths.

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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That's weird I think. I'd shudder more to think what my other tools have touched in their lifetime :)

I work with pyrotechnic stuff from time to time, and do think that the stainless steel surgeon type scalpels are superb tools. Then again, those are new (and thus sharp).

Code, justify, code - Pitr Dubovich